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I have some confusion regarding assembly and remoting so i want to clarify two points with you.

1) Remoting is used for communication between two applications in same or different computer, so my question is there any need to do remoting if both applications are in same computer as we can use private assembly or global assembly to directly interact with out client application then what is purpose of remoting if both assemblies or applications are in same computer.

2) If assembly is public i.e. Global assembly , and client applications is calling that assembly at that time both of them run in same or different appdomain ? If same at that case if many applications are using same global assembly then whether so many instance of that global assembly will created ? If not then whether when wo use global assembly then internally they use remoting for this.

Update:

1) If I use assemly present in global cache whether it run in same application domain as that of client who is calling this application or in different appdomain.

2) If multiple applications are using same assembly of global cache then whether this assembly run in some another app domain or it run in same appdomain of client applications , so in this case i4 4 applications are using same assembly it run in 4 appdomain.

3) If assembly of global cache run in different appdomain then whether they internally use remoting to communicate with client.

Please note here I am talking about application domain not about process in which all application runs.


I didn't get proper clarification. Please answer to my question step by step

1) If I use assemly present in global cache whether it run in same application domain as that of client who is calling this application or in different appdomain.

2) If multiple applications are using same assembly of global cache then whether this assembly run in some another app domain or it run in same appdomain of client applications , so in this case i4 4 applications are using same assembly it run in 4 appdomain.

3) If assembly of global cache run in different appdomain then whether they internally use remoting to communicate with client.

Please note here I am talking about application domain not about process in which all application runs.

Thank You.

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2 Answers

You're mistaken. There are no global assemblies. There is a global assembly cache. Even if an assembly is not there, it can be accessed by anyone if they know where to find it.

When you load the same assembly in multiple processes, you can't share information through it. Both processes have their private memory regions, the code of the assembly is shared, but not any data.

If you want to communicate on different or the same computers, you can use remoting, although WCF is preferred to remoting nowadays. If you want inter-process communication on the same computer, there are faster, but not necessarily easier ways, like sockets, shared memory, named pipes, etc. There's a whole lot of literature on this topic.

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Let me try and see if i can explain it with the help of an example

I have as assembly "common.dll" installed in GAC on machine "A"

Now, i have 2 applications "Application 1" and "Application 2" which both use "common.dll" Note: "Use" here is strictly related to sharing the definition of types in common.dll not their STATE

Both "Application 1" and "Application 2" are run in their own processes (assuming say both a console apps for simplicity). Hence if Application 1 wants to pass information to Application 2 - it is not trivial as it involves interprocess communication.

That is where "remoting" coming in. It allows "Application 1" to send messages to "Application2" so that they can share information at run - time with each other.

Remoting is basically a layer of classes in the .NET framework that hide from you the nitty gritty of how the interprocess communication takes place.

Note: Remoting is superceded by WCF at this point and it is recommended to use WCF for all out of process communication needs

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