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I'm trying to creating a Singleton class like below where MyRepository lies in separate DAL project. It's causing me a circular reference problem because GetMySingleTon() method returns MySingleTon class and needs its access. Same way I need MyRepository access in constructor of MySingleTon class.

  public class MySingleTon
  {
    static MySingleTon()
    {
      if (Instance == null)
      {
        MyRepository rep = new MyRepository();
        Instance = rep.GetMySingleTon();
      }
    }
    public static MySingleTon Instance { get; private set; }
    public string prop1 { get; set; }
    public string prop2 { get; set; }
  }

UPDATE: I was doing it very wrongly. I think didn't needed any singleton. Now I've created a class with static properties in a third project and I'm setting it once and accessing it everywhere. And it has solved my problem for now.

Thanks everyone for your answers.

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What does MyRepository do exactly? It sounds like it is responsible for returning the MySingleton instance. If so, can you not replace the initialiser with a constructor or static method and pass in this rather than creating a new repository within MySingleton? –  John Pickup Dec 30 '10 at 10:32
    
Why are you doing it this way? –  Jason Dec 30 '10 at 10:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The repository should not return a singleton object, a repository is used to access data and not returning singleton objects. Your repository could by itself be a singleton, but I don't recommend it, and I don't recommend using a singleton for the class using the repository either. In the code you have it seems like the repository needs to be aware of the "business layer" which is all messed up, the relationships should go only one way. I would re-write it as:

public class MySingleTon
{
    private MySingleTon()
    {
       // You constructor logic, maybe create a reference 
       // to your repository if you need it
    }

    private static MySingleTon _instance;
    public static MySingleTon Instance { 
       get
       {
          if(_instance == null)
             _instance = new MySingleTon();
          return _instance;
       }
    }
    public string prop1 { get; set; }
    public string prop2 { get; set; }
}

I don't recommend my solution, but it should solve you problem. What I do recommend is looking into dependency injection and inversion of control since your design seems sort of wrong. Have a look at NInject.

EDIT: One other thing, why does your singleton have several properties that are public? A singleton shouldn't expose properties it should only expose functions, and should mainly be used when you have a utility class like Math or a true singleton like a logger.

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Although , it is not good to create such a class intraction and i don't know what is the reason behind this.

but you can do similar to the below code

Create a project called Public Interface and define an interface IMyRepository with the public functions which you want to expose from MyRepository class.

Create a public property in the singleton class which returns IMyRepository and can be set outside the assembly also.

Now , you need to explicitly set this property from the assemblies which reference your singelton assembly and i assume you can create the object of MyRepository class from other assemblies.

Please note : Above solution is only a trick to break the circular reference not the optimal solution.

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While having the singleton accessor property within the class itself is a generally used shortcut, in more complicated situations when you need to deal with instances of multiple related classes it may prove the wrong way. The problem is mixing concerns within a single class.

Your MySingleton class shall be rather some MyClass which is implemented in way generally not dependent on the number of instances that will exist on run-time. Likewise MyRepository shall be able to manage and provide any number of MyClass instances. The fact you will be dealing with only a singleton instance of MyClass can be encapsulated into a separate factory (or accessor or whatever you call it) class that will bind MyClass and MyRepository together.

So try to rethink your design in the following way (schematic):

public class MyClass { ... }

public class MyRepository
{
    public MyClass GetMyClassInstance(...);
}

public static class MyClassFactory
{
    public static MyClass SingletonInstance 
    { 
        get 
        { 
            if (singletonInstance == null) 
                singletonInstance = myRepository.GetMyClassInstance(...);
            return singletonInstance;
        }
    }
}

The remaining question is where does myRepository come from. For example, it can be created on program start-up and provisioned into MyclassFactory as a member field.

At the end of the day, a lot can be made easier if you consider using an inversion of control container. The next step is also shift towards interface-based design. That gives you another layer of abstraction and provides more flexibility in terms of interchangeability of implementations.

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in addition to the code from Saurabh, you will change the Singleton class by :

public class MySingleTon
  {
    static MySingleTon()
    {
      if (Instance == null)
      {
        Instance = new MySingleTon();
      }
    }

    private MySingleTon(){}

    public static MySingleTon Instance { get; private set; }
    public IMyRepository MyRepository{ get; set ;}

  }
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