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My customer has specified, that he needs different actions to be executed, when certain conditions in an internal logic are met. Each action type (so far Command and WriteVariable) has an individual set of specific information, and therefore needs to be stored in an individual table. The user must be able to define the order in which the actions are to be executed.

I have the following setup for a Database:

LogicTable
* OutputID
* Description

OutputTable <== a pure relational table
* OutputID
* LogicID
* ActionID <== this references one of the action tables (Command/WriteVariable)
* ActionTypeID
* Sequence

ActionTypeTable
* ActionTypeID
* Description

CommandTable
* CommandID  <== corresponds to ActionID in OutputTable
three columns with further command-specific information

WriteVariableTable
* WriteVariableID  <== corresponds to ActionID in OutputTable
four columns with further write-variable-specific information

My problem is that I cannot have multiple relational tables, because I cannot guarantee the sequence of the actions across multiple tables. I cannot have multiple columns with foreign-keys to each individual action in the output table (customer requirement). With the above setup I cannot have referential integrity, causing possible ConfigurationException in my application due to foreign-key entries w/out corresponding primary key entry.

Is there a design that will enable referential integrity and manage to guarantee the order of referenced actions?

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Can you expand on the (customer requirement) portion - what, specifically, are the requirements in this area? Is it that no changes are made to the OutputTable definition? Or no storing or "redundant" data, or that ActionID must always be set, or what? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 30 '10 at 11:47
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: the customer requirement specifies that I cannot have null values in a key column. That means I cannot specify multiple columns, one for each action type, and use that to reference the underlying action. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 12:47
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the customer allows, you could add computed columns to the OutputTable table, e.g.

create table OutputTable (
  OutputID <datatype> <nullability>,
 LogicID <datatype> <nullability>,
 ActionID <datatype> <nullability>,
 ActionTypeID <datatype> <nullability>,
 Sequence <datatype> <nullability>,
  CommandActionID as CASE WHEN ActionTypeID = <Command Action> then ActionID END PERSISTED,
  WVActionID as CASE WHEN ActionTypeID = <Write Variable Action> then ActionID END PERSISTED,
    constraint FK_Output_CommandActions FOREIGN KEY (CommandActionID) references CommandTable (CommandID)
)

You can then use these computed columns as the source of your FK references. I still find this constraint from the customer a little confusing though - surely you should be able to define the schema such that the data contained within it is obviously correct - anything else is inviting integrity issues in the future.

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This would work if the ActionID was referenced in each child table and defined in the Output.Table. It is however the other way around: OutputTable.ActionID is itself a reference to one of the primary keys of CommandTable.CommandID or WriteVariable.WriteVariableID. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 13:22
    
@froeschili - I've added one FK constraint. That's the correct way around, I believe. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 30 '10 at 13:36
    
when I try to create a table with such computed fields and use one of those as foreign key reference, I get this error message Computed Column 'CommandActionID' in table 'IA_OutputTable' is invalid for use in 'FOREIGN KEY CONSTRAINT' because it is not persisted. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 15:01
    
@froeschili - easy fix there (sorry, I don't have the tables myself, so I'm not able to test my answers). Add the word persisted at the end of the computed column definitions (between END and the ,) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 30 '10 at 15:14
    
thanks for the quick reply. Adding persisted does work. I will have to check back with the customer, if this would still meet his requirements. I think there shouldn't be a problem in having null values, as these columns are calculated and cannot be mis-configured by a user. I will also have to talk this over with my colleagues coming Monday. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 15:30
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  • Each action is of a simple type (means there are no sub-actions).
  • "..when certain conditions in an internal logic are met" is called a business event.
  • Each business event is of a certain event type.
  • Each business event of a specific event type results in a set of actions.
  • Action Sequence No specifies the order of actions within each action set.

alt text

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Almost every BusinessEvent has a unique ActionSet, so the EventType is almost unnecessary. I will keep that in the back of my head though. I think the key point is splitting up my OutputTable into an Output and an OutputSet analog to your Action/ActionSet. I will have to talk this over with my colleagues coming Monday. I think this might get you an accepted answer though. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 15:24
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Two possibilities:

  1. Can you not add an OrderingId column to the Command and WriteVariable tables that you use to determine the order of actions to carry out? You will need to ensure programatically that the orderingIds used increase correctly as the DB can't ensure uniqueness across tables, so do this either in application code or in a trigger / stored proc

  2. Have an Action table with an orderingID (this could be your OutputTable table)

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To 1. Checking the correct increase through application code will not be possible, as the customer want to be able to manually alter values in the database. I'm not familiar enough with tirggers / stored procedures to ensure that myself. To 2. I already have a Sequence (call it OrderID for my sake) in Output.Table. This does not solve the problem of referential integrity. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 12:51
1  
It sounds like the referential integrity is backwards, i.e. both CommandTable and WriteVariableTable should have a FK that refers to OutputTable's PK (in fact their PKs should also be FK to OutputTable) rather than OutputTable referring to either of the two other tables. –  John Pickup Dec 30 '10 at 13:30
    
how could I then define more than one Logic/Output that reference the same Action i.e. the same Command? –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 15:03
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I don't really see the problem.... you already have your OutputTable which defines the sequence, correct? There's also the ActionID on the output table.

So now, each of your "child" tables like CommandTable and WriteVariableTable should just reference the OutputTable.ActionID. In SQL Server, to do this, you need to put a UNIQUE INDEX on ActionID, and then you could define:

ALTER TABLE dbo.CommandTable
   ADD CONSTRAINT FK_CommandTable_OutputTable
   FOREIGN KEY(CommandID) REFERENCES dbo.CommandTable.ActionID

and

ALTER TABLE dbo.WriteVariableTable
   ADD CONSTRAINT FK_WriteVariableTable_OutputTable
   FOREIGN KEY(WriteVariableID) REFERENCES dbo.CommandTable.ActionID

and now you have your referential integrity, perfectly checked - you have your sequence defined on the OutputTable, you can extend this to include additional "child" tables for other action types......

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The OutputTable.ActionID is actually a reference to the child tables, not a unique ID. The problem is, that the same action can be executed by several different logic elements. If I were to reverse this definition I would have multiple entries defining the same action, but referencing a different OutputTable.ActionID. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 11:55
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There's probably an infinite number of ways to do this. In my experience, having a separate table for each type of action would add complexity and make it difficult to add new actions. You might want to consider something like the following:

LogicTable
* OutputID
* Description

OutputTable <== a pure relational table
* OutputID
* LogicID
* ActionID
* ActionTypeID
* Sequence

ActionTypeTable
* ActionTypeID
* Description

Actions
* ActionID - primary key
* Sequence - not null
-- other columns as necessary to support the various
   actions, e.g. Command and WriteVariable

If some of the columns in Actions are not used for each different type of action, that's fine - a few null fields aren't going to hurt anything. Alternatively, you could have a more general design such as

Actions
* ActionID - primary key
* Sequence - not null


ActionArguments
* ActionID - foreign key to Actions, part of primary key
* ArgumentName - not NULL, part of primary key
* ArgumentValue

Just a couple ideas.

Share and enjoy.

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Your second alternative looks promising. How could I check though, that each action type has the correct number of arguments? As specified, each action type has a different signature and requires different additional information. –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 12:56
    
I think I'd probably consign this to program logic. Although you might be able to do something like this in a table trigger. –  Bob Jarvis Dec 30 '10 at 19:02
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Briefly, yes, I believe you've got your foreign keys backwards. Here's what I came up with quickly:

alt text

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What is different in your solution to the solution by Damir Sudarevic? –  froeschli Dec 30 '10 at 15:18
    
On reflection, I think you're right. This is the same thing. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '10 at 19:18
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