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I am using Eclipse + Mingw + Boost on Windows.

The problem I have appears when the debugger gets to this code fragment in Eclipse:

int YarpInterface::connect_to_port(std::string ip, std::string port, tcp::socket* socket)
{    
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;
    tcp::resolver resolver(io_service);
    tcp::resolver::query query(boost::asio::ip::tcp::v4(), ip, port);
    tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_iterator = resolver.resolve(query);
    tcp::resolver::iterator end;
    boost::system::error_code error = boost::asio::error::host_not_found;

    while (error && endpoint_iterator != end)
    {
       socket->close();
       socket->connect(*endpoint_iterator++, error);
    }
    if (error)
    {
       throw boost::system::system_error(error);
    }
    return true;
}

When I start debugging, gdb correctly stops inside the main, I can safely single step my code all the way until the socket->connect invocation, after this I loose all control over the execution and the program just continues to execute until it exits. All breakpoints after this line are ignored completely. I see no useful error messages in the gdb logs.

I am using the latest version of Mingw, Boost and Eclipse. I have compiled my code and boost using the same compiler, both with debug symbols enabled.

Edit: I can also step into the call all the way through boost code safely, therefore I am quite convinced that the problem occurs when gdb gets to the more low level system calls.

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What arguments did you give to bjam when building boost? –  Sam Miller Dec 30 '10 at 15:08
    
These: --address-model=32 variant=debug --debug-symbols=on --toolset=gcc –  user543498 Dec 30 '10 at 15:18
    
Some things to think about: Are you using async connect? If not, the thread calling connect is probably blocked. Are there other threads active (not blocked) at the time? –  JimR Dec 30 '10 at 18:42
    
I am using synchronous connect on purpose here, I think it's simpler that way. There is only one active thread, that does get blocked, but as it's freed, the execution continues, yet the breakpoints didn't work. –  user543498 Dec 30 '10 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue seems to be resolved for the time being. Useful tips for other poor souls debugging with gdb in Eclipse under Windows:

1) Be VERY careful about (Watch) Expressions. It seems that gdb tries to interpret these on every step. Provide wrong values here and you'll have a very unstable debugging experience.

2) Be careful with your printing. In my case, by looking at the gdb logs, I noticed that gdb does in fact stop at the required breakpoint, but Eclipse does not react. The issue was that my cout output somehow got printed in the gdb output, as this is how Eclipse retrieves information from gdb, it could not understand that the breakpoint was actually hit, and just waited there forever.

3) Try not to do too much stepping. Especially over socket->connect and exception calls.

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2) Be careful with your printing. In my case, by looking at the gdb logs, I noticed that gdb does in fact stop at the required breakpoint, but Eclipse does not react. The issue was that my cout output somehow got printed in the gdb output, as this is how Eclipse retrieves information from gdb, it could not understand that the breakpoint was actually hit, and just waited there forever.

This was also the issue for me - putting set new-console on into .gdbinit fixed it for me.

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