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I need to update a few hundred static Html pages that have the copyright date hard coded in the footer. I want to replace it with some javascript that will automatically update each year.

Currently I'm using:

<script type="text/javascript">var year = new Date();document.write(year.getFullYear());</script>

Is this as short as it gets?

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15  
I don't understand why people do this... You don't have to update the copyright year in order to keep it current. In fact, this could work against you! If someone copies your work in 2010, and your website says copyright 2011 because it auto-updates in January, then that could be construed to suggest you copied them. An older copyright would seem preferable! If anything, keep a running list, copyright 2009, 2010, 2011 or better a range: copyright 2009-2011. –  Stephen Dec 30 '10 at 12:38
4  
@Stephen: Definitely wants a starting date. The question doesn't say he's not doing that (as he didn't quote anything but the JavaScript that outputs the year). Could easily be Copyright (C) 2008-<script... –  T.J. Crowder Dec 30 '10 at 12:51
3  
Stephen - I work at a software firm with over 200 people, a few of them being on-staff lawyers - we update the copyright every year. I'm not saying you're wrong, but your logic may not apply to all business situations.. –  tpow Dec 30 '10 at 13:09
3  
@Stephen May this solve the problem you said: All right reserved &copy <script type="text/javascript">var cur = 2011; var year = new Date(); if(cur == year.getFullYear()) year = year.getFullYear(); else year = cur + ' - ' + year.getFullYear(); document.write(year);</script>. –  SIFE Nov 17 '12 at 23:31
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@Stephen - While this can vary from country to country having the beginning year, or the year the content was created is not needed any more. Smashing Magazine has a great article on Copyright –  Lynda Sep 3 '13 at 2:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 118 down vote accepted

Here's the shortest I can get it:

<script>document.write(new Date().getFullYear())</script>

That will work in all browsers I've run across.

How I got there:

  • You can just call getFullYear directly on the newly-created Date, no need for a variable. new Date().getFullYear() may look a bit odd, but it's reliable: the new Date() part is done first, then the .getFullYear().
  • You can drop the type, because JavaScript is the default; this is even documented as part of the HTML5 specification, which is likely in this case to be writing up what browsers already do.
  • You can drop the semicolon at the end for one extra saved character, because JavaScript has "automatic semicolon insertion," a feature I normally despise and rail against, but in this specific use case it should be safe enough.

Off-topic:

You may want to include a noscript in there as well that you update manually once a year, so you don't end up with a gap on browsers/crawlers/etc. that don't have JavaScript enabled.

I assume you already have a starting year in there, e.g. "Copyright © 2008-____" where ____ is what we're filling in.

Ideally, this would be better handled as an offline batch job (sed script on *nix, etc.) once a year, but if you want the JavaScript solution, I think that's as short as it gets. (Now I've gone and tempted fate.)

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2  
+1 for the noscript tip... –  tpow Dec 30 '10 at 13:10
2  
+1 for "I assume you already have a starting year in there" –  Stephen Dec 30 '10 at 14:55
1  
+1 for the offline batch job suggestion. –  Henrik Aug 20 '11 at 9:34
    
+1 the pure JS solution is great if you control the client, like a credits.html page inside an app. Of course the client can have the wrong year, but that's quite atypical. –  Yar Jan 12 '13 at 21:01
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@Leon: LOL I suspect you mean w3schools, and yes, they are. (The W3C tends not to do much in terms of examples -- which is probably less than ideal...) –  T.J. Crowder Mar 11 '13 at 16:28
<script type="text/javascript">document.write(new Date().getFullYear());</script>
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If you want to include a time frame, e.g. “© Company 2010-2014” which automatically updates each year, then the shortest code will have to look like this:

&copy; Copyright 2010<script>new Date().getFullYear()>2010&&document.write("-"+new Date().getFullYear());</script>, Company.
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You could just write doucment.write(new Date().getFullYear());, but... Why on Earth do you have few hundred pages with the exactly same code? Why don't you use some server-side language to include some file with that footer? Simple example in PHP:

 # footer.php

 <p>Copyright © <?php echo date('Y') ?> by ...</p>

 # any-file-with-that-footer.php

 ...
 <?php require './footer.php' ?>
 ...

That can be achieved in any server-side language almost the same way.

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Quote: "I need to update a few hundred static Html pages". Perhaps something from legacy era. –  darioo Dec 30 '10 at 12:35
    
He said static html pages. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 30 '10 at 12:36
    
These are some legacy pages across several websites. –  tpow Dec 30 '10 at 13:10

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