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In C++, I have a base class A, a sub class B. Both have the virtual method Visit. I would like to redefine 'Visit' in B, but B need to access the 'Visit' function of each A (and all subclass to).

I have something like that, but it tell me that B cannot access the protected member of A! But B is a A too :-P

So, what can I do?

class A
{
protected:
virtual Visit(...);
}

class B : public class A
{
protected:
vector<A*> childs;
Visit(...);
}

B::Visit(...)
{
 foreach(A* a in childs)
 {
   a->Visit(...);
 }
}

Thx

share|improve this question
    
I can't see from your code that B is a subclass of A. –  Alex B Dec 30 '10 at 12:47
    
Are you sure you are writing C++? In C++, there is no foreach keyword. –  Martin v. Löwis Dec 30 '10 at 12:49
    
What's foreach(A* a in childs)? Are there some macros that you haven't told us about in your code. –  Charles Bailey Dec 30 '10 at 12:50
    
@Charles this is pseudo code, just as Visit must return something and you can't just pass around ... –  CashCow Dec 30 '10 at 12:52
    
@CashCow: Thanks, I'll be more direct next time. –  Charles Bailey Dec 30 '10 at 12:57

5 Answers 5

You may access a protected member using your own object but you may not access a protected member using an alternative object unless it is also of your class (not simply the base class).

There is a workaround, just as there is a workaround with friendship not being inherited.

In any case with this example:

class A
{
protected:
  virtual void Visit(...);

  void visitOther( A& other, ... )
  {
     other.Visit(...);
  }
};



class B : public A
   {
       Visit(...);
       vector<A*> childs;
   };

   B::Visit(...)
    {
     BOOST_FOREACH( a, childs )
     {
         visitOther( *a, ... );
     }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
+1. It's also possible to make VisitOther static. –  Martin v. Löwis Dec 30 '10 at 12:59
    
Yes I considered making it static. –  CashCow Dec 30 '10 at 13:27

A virtual function's essence is exactly which you are escaping from. Here

foreach (A * in the Childs)
{
  a-> Visit (...);
}

all a will call it's corresponding Visit function.

It is unnecessary to publicly derive from A, you should use protected.

In A the Visit function is not virtual, and make a protected constructor, to restrict instantiation through inheratinance (and friends, and hax).

If you tell more details, we can also help more.

EDIT 1: if you are playing with virtuals, do not forget virtual destructors.

EDIT 2: try this:

foreach (A * in the Childs)
{
  a->A::Visit(...);
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is corrected in the "example". Now B is subclass of A.

share|improve this answer

just make B a friend of A :

class A  
{  
protected:  
    virtual void Visit();  
    friend class B;  
}; 

class B : public A  
{  
protected:  
    virtual void Visit();  
};
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Breaks encapsulation, what if I have a C derived from A as well, with the same problem? –  Yttrill Dec 30 '10 at 14:13
    
"friend" keyword exists, so it's not bad to use it when you know what you do : here there is no mention of class C so what do you want to complicate the scenario ? –  rolo Dec 30 '10 at 14:15

Listen to the compiler telling you your design is screwed and stop pretending you know better. Make Visit public. Better still, make it non-virtual:

struct A { 
  void Visit() { impl_visit(); }
private:
  virtual void impl_visit();
};

struct B : A {
private:
  Vector<A*> childs;
  void impl_visit() {
    ... 
    foreach child in childs child->Visit();
    ...
  }
};

Oh and while you're at it petition the Committee to add the nice "foreach/in" syntax. [I'm serious, they're looking for ways to make C++ easier to use!]

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