Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a bash script. I would like this script to do something different every time I call it (modulus three). Something like this :

First script call => echo "call 1"
Second script call => echo "call 2"
Third script call => echo "call 3"
Fourth script call => echo "call 1"
Fifth script call => echo "call 2"
Sixth script call => echo "call 3"
Seventh script call => echo "call 1"
...

What would be the simplest way to do this ?

Note that the script is not critical. For example : the counter can go back to one after a reboot :

...
n script call => echo "call 1"
n+1 script call => echo "call 2"
* reboot *
n+2 script call => echo "call 1"
...

is OK.

Thank you for your insights.

share|improve this question
2  
Are concurrent calls of this script expected? –  Goran Jovic Dec 30 '10 at 13:30
    
I am not sure I understand what you mean. If you mean : "the script can be called while another instance is running". The answer is : "no in a normal working case. And if there is, the cycle can be broken" –  almathie Dec 30 '10 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In Bash:

call=$(< call.txt)
case $call in
    0) do_thing_one;;
    1) do_thing_two;;
    2) do_thing_three;;
    *) do_oops_thing;;
esac
echo $(( (call + 1) % 3 )) > call.txt
share|improve this answer

Easiest approach is probably to just store the value in a file

if [[ `grep 2 config.txt` ]]
then 
    #run stuff version 2
    echo 3 > config.txt # next run will be 3
elif [[ `grep 3 config.txt` ]]
then
    #run stuff version 3
    echo 1 > config.txt # next run will be 1
else
    #run stuff version 1
    echo 2 > config.txt # next run will be 2
fi
share|improve this answer
1  
Why not just export an environmental variable that is unset after the third iteration? –  Tim Post Dec 30 '10 at 13:43
1  
@Tim: Because env vars only propagate down the process hierarchy, you can't modify the caller's environment. –  Jester Dec 30 '10 at 14:37
    
@Tim, it could work only if the script is called with source script.sh or . script.sh i'd say a file is simpler. –  Paul Creasey Dec 30 '10 at 14:48
    
It's not necessary to use command substitution (the backticks should be $() anyway, by the way) and brackets. You can do if grep -qs ... or if grep ... > /dev/null 2>&1. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 30 '10 at 15:19
    
@Dennis, agreed $() is better than backticks, habit is hard to break! –  Paul Creasey Dec 30 '10 at 15:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.