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I have a multi threaded wpf application with various HW interfaces.

I want to react to several HW failures that can happen.

For example :

one of the interfaces is a temperature sensor and i want that from a certain temp. a meesage would appear and notify the user that it happened.

i came up with the follwing design :

/// <summary>
/// This logic reacts to errors that occur during the system run.
/// The reaction is set by the component that raised the error.
/// </summary>

public class ErrorHandlingLogic : Logic
{

}

the above class would consume ErrorEventData that holds all the information about the error that occurred.

public class ErrorEventData : IEventData
    {
        #region public enum

        public enum ErrorReaction
        {
        }

        #endregion public enum

        #region Private Data Memebers and props

        private ErrorReaction m_ErrorReaction;

        public ErrorReaction ErrorReactionValue
        {
            get { return m_ErrorReaction; }
            set { m_ErrorReaction = value; }
        }

        private string m_Msg;

        public string Msg
        {
            get { return m_Msg; }
            set { m_Msg = value; }
        }

        private string m_ComponentName;

        public string ComponentName
        {
            get { return m_ComponentName; }
            set { m_ComponentName = value; }
        }

        #endregion Private Data Memebers and props

        public ErrorEventData(ErrorReaction reaction, string msg, string componenetName)
        {
            m_ErrorReaction = reaction;
            m_Msg = msg;
            m_ComponentName = componenetName;
        }
    }

the above ErrorHandlingLogic would decide what to do with the ErrorEventData sent to him from various components of the application.

if needed it would be forwarded to the GUI to display a message to the user.

so what do you think is it a good design ?

thanks, Adiel.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems fair enough, however, in terms of design I would have probably just went with a standard Event with custom event args.

Here is an example:

public interface IEventData
{
    ErrorReaction Reaction { get; }
    string Message { get; }
    ComponentName { get; }
}

public class HardwareChangeEventData : IEventData
{
    public HardwareChangeEventData(ErrorReaction reaction, string msg, string componentName)         
    {             
        Reaction = reaction;             
        Message = msg;             
        ComponentName = componentName;         
    }

    public ErrorReaction Reaction { get; private set; }
    public string Message { get; private set; }
    public ComponentName { get; private set; }
}

....

// introduce a base class so all hardware components can raise the event
public class HardwareComponent    
{
    public delegate void HardwareChangedEventHandler(IEventData ed);
    public event HardwareChangedEventHandler HardwareChanged;

    //event-invoking method that derived classes can override.
    protected virtual void OnHardwareChanged(IEventData ed)
    {
        HardwareChangedEventHandler handler = HardwareChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, ed);
        }
    }
}

public class TemperatureGauge : HardwareComponent
{
    public void Monitor()
    {
         // example logic
         while (...)
         {
             if (Temperature < LowThreshold)
             {
                  IEventData ed = new HardwareChangeEventData(ErrorReaction.IncreaseTemp, "Temperature too low!", "TemperatureGauge");
                  OnHardwareChanged(ed);
             } 
         }
    }

    public override OnHardwareChanged(IEventData ed)
    {
        // do something with ed internally (if applicable)
        // forward event on to base so it can be passed out to subscribers
        base.OnHardwareChanged(ed);
    }
}
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I am in support of this answer and would add that reacting to a high or low temperature is not error handling, naming it as such is actually confusing. –  Steve Fenton Dec 30 '10 at 13:49
    
certain temperatures can cause the system serious problems and make the entire opertaion fail and make the product rejected. it sounds to me like an error ... –  Adiel Yaacov Dec 30 '10 at 13:53
    
I agree with Sohnee about the event not being an error event per see. When you speak of error during the execution of a program, you will commonly think of error occuring during the execution, or error from your sensor (IE sensor or program malfunctions). In your case, I think you could find a less ambiguous naming. –  Eilistraee Dec 30 '10 at 13:54
    
James, the IEventData is an interface for all the events that are raised between objects in the application. –  Adiel Yaacov Dec 30 '10 at 13:56
    
@Adiel - If your IEventData is simply exposing those particular properties there is no reason why your custom event args can't implement the same interface. I will show you an example... –  James Dec 30 '10 at 14:01
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Above code looks fine.

But for notifying different components , i would say look for Observer pattern ( Event/Deleagte)

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thanks, it is really the pattern im using. i didnt mention it beacuse i wanted to focus on the error handling issue. –  Adiel Yaacov Dec 30 '10 at 13:55
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if you are going to handle error in WPF why don't use validators for that? see this acticle

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im not familiar with Validators. i'll check it out. thanks. –  Adiel Yaacov Dec 30 '10 at 14:23
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