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(function () {
    var x = 1;
    return {
        f: function (x) {
            alert(x);
        }
    };
}()).f(2);

Suppose I don't want to rename either variable. There is no way to, from within f, access the variable x, which was declared first - right?

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1  
you could expose the variable with a method –  hunter Dec 30 '10 at 13:48
1  
Why don't you want to rename either variable? –  strager Dec 30 '10 at 13:55
1  
The parameter x shadows the variable x. Like in a lot of other programming languages (which sometimes can be resolved but in this example, no). –  Felix Kling Dec 30 '10 at 13:59
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Correct. Because you have a different x in function (x), any attempt to access x will get that one (the nearest scope). It blocks access to any x in a wider scope.

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Thanks - was just looking for a reassurement. –  feklee Dec 30 '10 at 14:06
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You could return the variable with the function:

(function () {
    var x = 1;
    return {
        f: function () {
            alert(this.x);
        },
        x:x
    };
}()).f();
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There is no way to, from within f, access the variable x, which was declared first

No, there is not. The inner scope x hides the outer scope x.

var closure = (function () {
    var local = {};
    local.x = 1;
    return {
        f: function (x) {
            alert(x || local.x);
        }
    };
}());

closure.f(2);  // alerts "2"
closure.f();   // alerts "1"

You can't have an inner variable called "local", of course. ;-)

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This allows you to use both x (1) and x (2) at the same time.

(function () {
    var x = 1;
    return {
        f: function (x) {
            alert(x); // paramter (=2)
            alert(this.x); // scoped variable (=1)
        },
        x:x
    };
}()).f(2);
share|improve this answer
    
An interesting approach. Thanks! Though, in the real-life case, I do not want to expose that x. –  feklee Dec 30 '10 at 14:09
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