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    var set = TreeSet(5,4,3,2,1)
    println(set)

    val diffSet: TreeSet[Int] = set
    // if I change above code to val diffSet: Set[Int] = set
    // the result is unsorted set.

    for (i <- diffSet; x = i) {
        println(i)
    }
    println("-" * 20)
    // the above code translates to below and print the same result
    val temp = diffSet.map(i => (i, i))
    for ((i, x) <- temp) {
        println(i)
    }

My question is if I defined a method like this:

def genSet:Set[Int] = {
  TreeSet(5, 4, 3, 2, 1)
}

and when i want to use a for loop with it

for (i <- genSet; x = i + 1) {
  println(x)
}

the result is unsorted, how to fix this behavior without change the genSet's return type. if I use for loop like below, it will be fine, but I hope to keep the above code style.

for (i <- genSet) {
  val x = i + 1
  println(x)
}
share|improve this question
    
This may be a question for the mailing list: scala-user@listes.epfl.ch –  sblundy Dec 30 '10 at 15:46
2  
I think it is a flaw to rely on the fact that the instantiated object happens to be a TreeSet. If you need ordering, then you want the static type to convey that the set will be sorted. If you'd notice that a function def f:Set[T] from a 3rd party lib happened to return TreeSet[T], I'm sure you'd be reluctant to rely on this in your code as it would break if the library designer decided to change the instantiated type. Probably good idea to exercise the same discipline when calling your own code. –  huynhjl Dec 30 '10 at 18:28
    
thanks for your advice. –  Googol Shan Dec 31 '10 at 5:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Why the map version winds up unsorted

The map method (called with a function that we'll call func) takes an implicit CanBuildFrom parameter that takes into account the type of the collection that map is being called on, in addition to the type that func returns to choose an appropriate return type. This is used to make Map.map[Int] or BitSet.map[String] do the right thing (return general purpose lists) while Map.map[(String,Int)] or BitSet.map[Int] also do the right thing (return a Map and a BitSet) respectively.

The CanBuildFrom is chosen at compile time, so it must be chosen based on the static type of the set that you call map on (the type the compiler knows about at compile time). The static type of set is TreeSet, but the static type of diffset is Set. The dynamic type of both (at runtime) is TreeSet.

When you call map on set (a TreeSet), the compiler chooses immutable.this.SortedSet.canBuildFrom[Int](math.this.Ordering.Int) as the CanBuildFrom.

When you call map on diffset (a Set), the compiler chooses immutable.this.Set.canBuildFrom[Int] as the CanBuildFrom.

Why the for version winds up unsorted

The loop

for (i <- genSet; x = i + 1) {
  println(x)
}

desugars into

genSet.map(((i) => {
              val x = i.$plus(1);
              scala.Tuple2(i, x)
            })).foreach(((x$1) => x$1: @scala.unchecked match {
              case scala.Tuple2((i @ _), (x @ _)) => println(x)
            }))

The desugared version includes a map function which will use the unsorted CanBuildFrom as I explained above.

On the other hand, the loop

for (i <- genSet) {
  val x = i + 1
  println(x)
}

desugars into

genSet.foreach(((i) => {
              val x = i.$plus(1);
              println(x)
            }))

Which doesn't use a CanBuildFrom at all, since no new collection is being returned.

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting. Looks to me that the behavior of this method is therefore dependent upon the type of the variable to which it is assigned and implicits are the the means by which that happens. Arguably this is simply a drawback to the design of the API, but this behavior is unexpected. –  sblundy Dec 30 '10 at 18:13
    
@sblundy: What would you expect the order of the numbers in SortedSet(1,2,3).map(x => 10-x) to be? Note that the compiler doesn't know enough about the transformation function to make SortedSet(7,6,5) be an option. What about SortedSet(2,3,4,5).map(x => x/2) (which uses integer division)? –  Ken Bloom Dec 30 '10 at 18:55
2  
@sblundy: Depending on what he's trying to do with the order of the elements in the SortedSet, he actually want to call toSeq before calling map (if the point is traversing the mapped values in an order corresponding to their order in the set), or he may want to call toSortedSet (if the point is range lookup of the mapped values). The appropriate behavior relates entirely to how he plans to use the orderedness. –  Ken Bloom Dec 30 '10 at 19:06
    
Very good explain for this situation, I vague feel map cause the problem, but didn't know how, and I know it now. –  Googol Shan Dec 31 '10 at 5:15
    
Whoops: there is no toSortedSet, however one can use TreeSet.empty ++ diffSet to achieve the same effect. –  Ken Bloom Jan 2 '11 at 17:44

Set does not guarantee ordering. Even if the underlying class is a TreeSet, if the expected result is a Set you'll loose the ordering in the first transformation you do.

If you want ordering, do not use Set. I suggest, say, SortedSet.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't that violate polymorphism? One uses the interface to guarantee what happens but the behavior of the instance should not vary by the context in which it is used. –  sblundy Dec 30 '10 at 17:04
    
@sblundy: there are different kinds of polymorphism. Inheritance and function overriding are one kind of polymorphism. Generics are another kind of polymorphism. It's the latter kind that's causing problems. –  Ken Bloom Dec 30 '10 at 17:50
    
@Ken Bloom: Based on your answer, the problem appears to be implicits. They enable the method to change its behavior based upon its context. Sometimes this is a feature, sometimes not. –  sblundy Dec 30 '10 at 18:17
    
@sblundy: That's correct. It's implicits. I made a stupid brain fart in my last comment. –  Ken Bloom Dec 30 '10 at 18:51
    
@sblundy Not, it doesn't violate polymorphism -- this is determined by the type parameters. Specifically, Set extends SetLike[A, Set[A]], and it is the second parameter of SetLike that determine the lower bound of the type returned by map and similar methods. A SortedSet extends, indirectly, SetLike[A, This], where This is defined as SortedSet[A], which lowers the bound. The final step of jumping from the type bound to the result type is done through implicit. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 31 '10 at 10:59

Change the sig of genSet to return a SortedSet

def genSet:SortedSet[Int] = {
  TreeSet(5, 4, 3, 2, 1)
}

This is probably some sort of bug. I would have expected your code to work too.

I think map is the culprit. This results in the same behavior:

for (i <- genSet.map(_ + 1)) { println(i) }

And for(i <- genSet; x = i + 1) equates to for(x <- genSet.map({i => i + 1}))

share|improve this answer
2  
The "wrong" map is being called: scala> TreeSet(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).map(identity) res1: scala.collection.immutable.SortedSet[Int] = TreeSet(4, 5, 1, 2, 3) scala> (TreeSet(1, 2, 3, 4, 5): Set[Int]).map(identity) res2: scala.collection.immutable.Set[Int] = Set(4, 5, 1, 2, 3) –  mpilquist Dec 30 '10 at 15:34
    
Looks that way to me. The big refactoring binge for 2.8 was supposed to reduce problems like this... –  sblundy Dec 30 '10 at 15:43
    
The big refactoring binge for 2.8 was supposed to solve other much more common problems (see my answer to this question) by introducing a CanBuildFrom to decide what type a call to map should return. The introduction of the CanBuildFrom created the problem you're seeing. –  Ken Bloom Dec 30 '10 at 17:46

You can do:

scala> for (i <-genSet.view; x = i + 1) println(x)
2
3
4
5
6

Although, it's the type of trick that when you look at it after a few months, you may wonder why you added .view ...

share|improve this answer
1  
And it isn't really guaranteed to work -- at least until the tickets opened on it get solved. :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 31 '10 at 11:10
    
You mean 4116 and 4117? Yeah I had skipped over that thread and wasn't aware of it. –  huynhjl Dec 31 '10 at 14:58

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