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html is a piece of HTML containing inline Javascript resulting from an AJAX request. The following code:

$(html).filter('script')

returns a jQuery object for each script tag, whereas:

$('script', $(html))

returns an empty array. How is this possible? I'm using Chromium 10.0.

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3  
$('script', $(html)) do check if $(html) node is not your desired <script> tag. For this to work 'script' should be child of $(html) jquery object. That is my understanding. –  Ajaxe Dec 30 '10 at 14:58
    
This has something to do with DOM scope, but for some reason it doesn't work for script tags at all when I test it. –  BoltClock Dec 30 '10 at 15:04
    
@Ajaxe, you are right, this turns out to be a scoping issue. –  Ton van den Heuvel Dec 31 '10 at 8:58

2 Answers 2

The difference is that $('script', $(html)) is turned into

$(html).find('script')

not

$(htmls).filter('script');

I believe that script tags of a certain type are removed from strings under the guise of keeping IE happy. A year ago, I delved into the jQuery source and found where it did that, but I can't remember why it did that.

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Ok got something here, I wonder if answer is still relevant or not anyways here it goes.
Create a new JS file say it as "scriptTagTest.js" add the following js code

var html = '<div>I am DIV</div><script type="text/javascript">alert("I am inline");</script>';  
$(document).ready(function(e){  
  $('#inStr').text(html);  
});  

$('#test1').live('click', function(e){  
    var $html = $(html);  
  var o = $html.filter('script');  
  check(o);  
});  

$('#test2').live('click', function(e){  
    var $html = $(html);  
  var o = $('script', $html);  
  check(o);  
});  

function check($o, $html){  
  alert('obj len:'+ $o.length);  
    var $testArea = $('#testArea');  
  if($o.length > 0){  
    $testArea.append($o);  
  }  
  else{  
    $testArea.text('No script obj');  
  }  
}  

and then the html file as

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <!--[if IE]>
      <script src="http://html5shiv.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js"></script>
    <![endif]-->
    <script src="scriptTagTest.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
  <p id="hello">Hello World</p>
  <div id="inStr">test</div>
  <button id="test1">Test $(html).filter('script')</button>
  <button id="test2">Test $('script', $(html))</button>
  <div id="testArea">&nbsp;</div>
</body>
</html>  

click "Test1" and "Test2" to see the results. Interestingly, the browser didn't parse the variable html with the <script> tag properly which I haven't come across earlier, thats why another JS file.

find() is used to look into the child elements while filter() finds in flat list of objects as well. If you incoming html is is in the form of the html variable then that might explain something.
Tested this in chrome 8 (desktop), FF, IE latest versions. Hope this helps. Best would be to drill down using Firebug!!

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