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This is a general design question not relating to any language. I'm a bit torn between going for minimum code or optimum organization.

I'll use my current project as an example. I have a bunch of tabs on a form that perform different functions. Lets say Tab 1 reads in a file with a specific layout, tab 2 exports a file to a specific location, etc. The problem I'm running into now is that I need these tabs to do something slightly different based on the contents of a variable. If it contains a 1 I may need to use Layout A and perform some extra concatenation, if it contains a 2 I may need to use Layout B and do no concatenation but add two integer fields, etc. There could be 10+ codes that I will be looking at.

Is it more preferable to create an individual path for each code early on, or attempt to create a single path that branches out only when absolutely required.

Creating an individual path for each code would allow my code to be extremely easy to follow at a glance, which in turn will help me out later on down the road when debugging or making changes. The downside to this is that I will increase the amount of code written by calling some of the same functions in multiple places (for example, steps 3, 5, and 9 for every single code may be exactly the same.

Creating a single path that would branch out only when required will be a bit messier and more difficult to follow at a glance, but I would create less code by placing conditionals only at steps that are unique.

I realize that this may be a case-by-case decision, but in general, if you were handed a previously built program to work on, which would you prefer?


Edit: I've drawn some simple images to help express it. Codes 1/2/3 are the variables and the lines under them represent the paths they would take. All of these steps need to be performed in a linear chronological fashion, so there would be a function to essentially just call other functions in the proper order.

Different Paths

alt text

Single Path

alt text

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2  
This is the sort of subjective question that belongs on Programmers.SE. –  David Thornley Dec 30 '10 at 15:43
    
Thanks David - Never been there before. Checking it out now –  Alec Sanger Dec 30 '10 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Creating a single path that would branch out only when required will be a bit messier and more difficult to follow at a glance, but I would create less code by placing conditionals only at steps that are unique.

Im not buying this statement. There is a level of finesse when deciding when to write new functions. Functions should be as simple and reusable as possible (but no simpler). The correct answer is almost never 'one big file that does a lot of branching'.

Less LOC (lines of code) should not be the goal. Readability and maintainability should be the goal. When you create functions, the names should be self documenting. If you have a large block of code, it is good to do something like

   function doSomethingComplicated() {
        stepOne();
        stepTwo(); 
        // and so on
   }

where the function names are self documenting. Not only will the code be more readable, you will make it easier to unit test each segment of the code in isolation.

For the case where you will have a lot of methods that call the same exact methods, you can use good OO design and design patterns to minimize the number of functions that do the same thing. This is in reference to your statement "The downside to this is that I will increase the amount of code written by calling some of the same functions in multiple places (for example, steps 3, 5, and 9 for every single code may be exactly the same."

The biggest danger in starting with one big block of code is that it will never actually get refactored into smaller units. Just start down the right path to begin with....

EDIT --

for your picture, I would create a base-class with all of the common methods that are used. The base class would be abstract, with an abstract method. Subclasses would implement the abstract method and use the common functions they need. Of course, replace 'abstract' with whatever your language of choice provides.

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@Eclyps19, sure, functions can do their own internal branching. Thats no issue. The issue is having MASSIVE functions that do too much. If a function does more than one thing, it should be broken down into more than one function. –  hvgotcodes Dec 30 '10 at 15:49
    
Sorry - I deleted my original comment after you added more. I agree that each method should try to only perform a single function, and for the most part I do have that modularity going on. I've added pictures to my original post if that clears it up a bit. My code will need to be executed in a chronological fashion (there will always be a step 1 through step n). –  Alec Sanger Dec 30 '10 at 16:09
    
@Eclyps19, updated my answer. –  hvgotcodes Dec 30 '10 at 16:24
    
Good answer. That helps a lot, thank you. –  Alec Sanger Dec 30 '10 at 16:27

You should always err on the side of generalization, with the only exception being early prototyping (where throughput of generating working stuff is majorly impacted by designing correct abstractions/generalizations). having said that, you should NEVER leave that mess of non-generalized cloned branches past the early prototype stage, as it leads to messy hard to maintain code (if you are doing almost the same thing 3 different times, and need to change that thing, you're almost sure to forget to change 1 out of 3).

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Again it's hard to specifically answer such an open ended question, but I believe you don't have to sacrifice one for the other.

OOP techniques solves this issue by allowing you to encapsulate the reusable portions of your code and generate child classes to handle object specific behaviors.

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Personally I think you might (if possible by your API) create inherited forms, create them on fly on master form (with tabs), pass agruments and embed in tab container.

When to inherit form and when to decide to use arguments (code) to show/hide/add/remove functionality is up to you, yet master form should contain only decisions and argument passing and embeddable forms just plain functionality - this way you can separate organisation from implementation.

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