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I've seen a lot of posts about stack trace and exceptions in Python. But haven't found what I need.

I have a chunk of Python 2.7 code that may raise an exception. I would like to catch it and assign to a string its full description and the stack trace that caused the error (simply all we use to see on the console). I need this string to print it to a text box in the GUI.

Something like this:

try:
    method_that_can_raise_an_exception(params)
except Exception, e:
    print_to_textbox(complete_exception_description(e))

The problem is: what is the function complete_exception_description?

share|improve this question
    
I hope you realize that this may be useful to get rid of the console window even when debugging, but isn't proper error reporting at all when dealing with the user? – delnan Dec 30 '10 at 17:59
1  
@delnan the tools involved in putting together such a string will allow for better handling too. :) – Karl Knechtel Dec 30 '10 at 18:09
up vote 218 down vote accepted

See the traceback module, specifically the format_exc() function. Here.

import traceback

try:
    raise ValueError
except:
    tb = traceback.format_exc()
else:
    tb = "No error"
finally:
    print tb
share|improve this answer
3  
traceback.format_exc should do the same without needing to join manually - but that's just nitpicking. +1 – delnan Dec 30 '10 at 17:47
3  
Those functions are not in the order I expected on the doc page, so I missed format_exc(). Agreed that it's much simpler to use that and changed accordingly. – kindall Dec 30 '10 at 18:24
>>> import sys
>>> import traceback
>>> try:
...   5 / 0
... except ZeroDivisionError, e:
...   type_, value_, traceback_ = sys.exc_info()
>>> traceback.format_tb(traceback_)
['  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>\n']
>>> value_
ZeroDivisionError('integer division or modulo by zero',)
>>> type_
<type 'exceptions.ZeroDivisionError'>
>>>
>>> 5 / 0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

You use sys.exc_info() to collect the information and the functions in the traceback module to format it. Here are some examples for formatting it.

The whole exception string is at:

>>> ex = traceback.format_exception(type_, value_, traceback_)
>>> ex
['Traceback (most recent call last):\n', '  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>\n', 'ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero\n']
share|improve this answer

Get exception description and stack trace which caused an exception, all as a string

To create a decently complicated stacktrace to demonstrate that we get the full stacktrace:

def raise_error():
    raise RuntimeError('something bad happened!')

def do_something_that_might_error():
    raise_error()

Logging the full stacktrace

A best practice is to have a logger set up for your module. It will know the name of the module and be able to change levels (among other attributes, such as handlers)

import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG)
logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

And we can use this logger to get the error:

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    logger.exception(error)

Which logs:

ERROR:__main__:something bad happened!
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!

And so we get the same output as when we have an error:

>>> do_something_that_might_error()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!

Getting just the string

If you really just want the string, use the traceback.format_exc function instead, demonstrating logging the string here:

import traceback
try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    logger.debug(traceback.format_exc())

Which logs:

DEBUG:__main__:Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!
share|improve this answer

You might also consider using the built-in Python module, cgitb, to get some really good, nicely formatted exception information including local variable values, source code context, function parameters etc..

For instance for this code...

import cgitb
cgitb.enable(format='text')

def func2(a, divisor):
    return a / divisor

def func1(a, b):
    c = b - 5
    return func2(a, c)

func1(1, 5)

we get this exception output...

ZeroDivisionError
Python 3.4.2: C:\tools\python\python.exe
Tue Sep 22 15:29:33 2015

A problem occurred in a Python script.  Here is the sequence of
function calls leading up to the error, in the order they occurred.

 c:\TEMP\cgittest2.py in <module>()
    7 def func1(a, b):
    8   c = b - 5
    9   return func2(a, c)
   10
   11 func1(1, 5)
func1 = <function func1>

 c:\TEMP\cgittest2.py in func1(a=1, b=5)
    7 def func1(a, b):
    8   c = b - 5
    9   return func2(a, c)
   10
   11 func1(1, 5)
global func2 = <function func2>
a = 1
c = 0

 c:\TEMP\cgittest2.py in func2(a=1, divisor=0)
    3
    4 def func2(a, divisor):
    5   return a / divisor
    6
    7 def func1(a, b):
a = 1
divisor = 0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero
    __cause__ = None
    __class__ = <class 'ZeroDivisionError'>
    __context__ = None
    __delattr__ = <method-wrapper '__delattr__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __dict__ = {}
    __dir__ = <built-in method __dir__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __doc__ = 'Second argument to a division or modulo operation was zero.'
    __eq__ = <method-wrapper '__eq__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __format__ = <built-in method __format__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __ge__ = <method-wrapper '__ge__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __getattribute__ = <method-wrapper '__getattribute__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __gt__ = <method-wrapper '__gt__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __hash__ = <method-wrapper '__hash__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __init__ = <method-wrapper '__init__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __le__ = <method-wrapper '__le__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __lt__ = <method-wrapper '__lt__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __ne__ = <method-wrapper '__ne__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object>
    __reduce__ = <built-in method __reduce__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __reduce_ex__ = <built-in method __reduce_ex__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __repr__ = <method-wrapper '__repr__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __setattr__ = <method-wrapper '__setattr__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __setstate__ = <built-in method __setstate__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __sizeof__ = <built-in method __sizeof__ of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __str__ = <method-wrapper '__str__' of ZeroDivisionError object>
    __subclasshook__ = <built-in method __subclasshook__ of type object>
    __suppress_context__ = False
    __traceback__ = <traceback object>
    args = ('division by zero',)
    with_traceback = <built-in method with_traceback of ZeroDivisionError object>

The above is a description of an error in a Python program.  Here is
the original traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "cgittest2.py", line 11, in <module>
    func1(1, 5)
  File "cgittest2.py", line 9, in func1
    return func2(a, c)
  File "cgittest2.py", line 5, in func2
    return a / divisor
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero
share|improve this answer

my 2-cents:

import sys, traceback
try: 
  ...
except Exception, e:
  T, V, TB = sys.exc_info()
  print ''.join(traceback.format_exception(T,V,TB))
share|improve this answer

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