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I have an SQLite db with a table that contains 4 fields. The create statement is:
CREATE TABLE [time] (
[id] INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
[from] TIME NOT NULL,
[until] TIME NOT NULL,
[message] TEXT NOT NULL,
)

After creation I would like to add some test data. For this I use:
INSERT INTO time('from','until','message') VALUES('00:00','01:00','test')

The result in the database is
id = 1
from = 0:00:00
until = 0:00:00
message = test

Obviously the time is incorrect, meaning that it is not what I want it to be. What is wrong in my insert statement? I already found this website, but I am not sure how it should help me. Of course, sample code could help me a great deal.

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I can't reproduce this: sqlite> SELECT time([from]) FROM time; 00:00:00 sqlite> SELECT time([until]) FROM time; 01:00:00 –  dkarp Dec 30 '10 at 18:56
    
sqlite has no TIME datatype, according to sqlite.org/datatype3.html so you inserted text into your 'from' and 'until' columns. I recommend that you include date and time values (formatted as "YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.SSS") in the strings you save in these columns. It doesn't really make sense to record times in a database without recording the dates as well. –  d5e5 Dec 30 '10 at 19:33
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1 Answer 1

I couldn't reproduce your results either, I got the same result as dkarp. You don't have to assign a datatype to columns in sqlite tables so apparently if you assign an invalid one it is ignored. In your case your text values were saved as text.

sqlite has no TIME datatype, according to sqlite.org/datatype3.html so you can assign TEXT as the affinity for the 'from' and 'until' columns instead. It makes more sense to save your values as strings containing the date and the time rather than time alone... something like the following:

sqlite> CREATE TABLE [time] (
   ...> [id] INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
   ...> [from] TEXT NOT NULL,
   ...> [until] TEXT NOT NULL,
   ...> [message] TEXT NOT NULL
   ...> );
sqlite> 
sqlite> 
sqlite> INSERT INTO time('from','until','message') VALUES(date('now') || ' 00:00',date('now') || ' ' || '01:00','test');
sqlite> INSERT INTO time('from','until','message') VALUES(date('now') || ' 14:00',date('now') || ' ' || '15:30','test');
sqlite> 
sqlite> SELECT * from time;
1|2010-12-30 00:00|2010-12-30 01:00|test
2|2010-12-30 14:00|2010-12-30 15:30|test
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In the setup where I use it, I really need no date. I am only intereted in the time, but when using TEXT to store the values in, I can do that as well. Thank you all for your comments –  patrix Dec 31 '10 at 11:01
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