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When I use Sql Server and there's an error, the error message gives a line number that has no correlation to the line numbers in the stored procedure. I assume that the difference is due to white space and comments, but is it really?

How can I relate these two sets of line numbers to each other? If anyone could give me at least a pointer in the right direction, I'd really appreciate it.

I'm using sql server 2005.

TIA!

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I think the line number relates to the body of the proc. i.e. ignore the header. –  Martin Smith Dec 30 '10 at 19:33
    
Maybe stackoverflow.com/questions/4550342/… will help. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '10 at 19:35
    
Where does the header end? After the begin that follows the alter procedure ... AS? –  chama Dec 30 '10 at 19:36
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Described in my answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2947173/… –  gbn Dec 30 '10 at 19:43
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@Martin. I think you're right, but it is sometimes helpful. –  G Mastros Dec 30 '10 at 19:45

3 Answers 3

IIRC, it starts counting lines from the start of the batch that created that proc. That means either the start of the script, or else the last "GO" statement before the create/alter proc statement.

An easier way to see that is to pull the actual text that SQL Server used when creating the object. Switch your output to text mode (CTRL-T with the default key mappings) and run

sp_helptext proc_name

Copy paste the results into a script window to get syntax highlighting etc, and use the goto line function (CTRL-G I think) to go to the error line reported.

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great tip, thanks. –  codeulike Jun 13 '11 at 13:54
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When I did this in Grid-Output mode, it stuck the line numbers on too –  codeulike Jun 13 '11 at 14:20
    
@codeulike - Good point, if you use Grid output the row number will match the line number, so you don't need to use CTRL+G. My only issue with Grid output is that it changes TAB characters to a single SPACE, so you lose all the formatting. –  Rick Jun 13 '11 at 19:21

Actually this Error_number() works very well.

This function starts counts from the last GO (Batch Separator) statement, so if you have not used any Go spaces and it is still showing a wrong line number - then add 7 to it, as in stored procedure in line number 7 the batch separator is used automatically. So if you use select Cast(Error_Number()+7 as Int) as [Error_Number] - you will get the desired answer.

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You mean ERROR_LINE(), right? –  Fabricio Araujo May 29 '13 at 18:56

you can use this

CAST(ERROR_LINE() AS VARCHAR(50))

and if you want to make error log table you can use this :

INSERT INTO dbo.tbname( Source, Message) VALUES ( ERROR_PROCEDURE(), '[ ERROR_SEVERITY : ' + CAST(ERROR_SEVERITY() AS VARCHAR(50)) + ' ] ' + '[ ERROR_STATE : ' + CAST(ERROR_STATE() AS VARCHAR(50)) + ' ] ' + '[ ERROR_PROCEDURE : ' + CAST(ERROR_PROCEDURE() AS VARCHAR(50)) + ' ] ' + '[ ERROR_NUMBER : ' + CAST(ERROR_NUMBER() AS VARCHAR(50)) + ' ] ' +  '[ ERROR_LINE : ' + CAST(ERROR_LINE() AS VARCHAR(50)) + ' ] ' + ERROR_MESSAGE())
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Note that ERROR_LINE() is only available in the CATCH part of a TRY/CATCH within the stored procedure. The line number it reports is the same one that SQL Server returns if you don't catch the error. So while that can be useful, it doesn't help to solve this question. –  Rick Feb 24 '11 at 18:51

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