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How many times 'x' value will be tested in the following code snippet ?

int x;
for(x=0;x < 10; x++)
   printf("%d",x);

To me it seems that the answer is 11 but my module says it is 10 ?! what am I missing?

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The debugger is your friend –  Ed S. Dec 30 '10 at 20:34
    
@Ed Swangren: I am not much aware of how to use a debugger :( I will however appreciate any further help in this regard :) –  Quixotic Dec 30 '10 at 20:38
1  
what does "tested" mean? what does "my module says it is 10" mean? –  Gene Bushuyev Dec 30 '10 at 21:39
    
If the compiler unrolls the code the real answer might be zero... –  dmckee Dec 31 '10 at 1:01

12 Answers 12

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Eleven, as the condition is tested at the beginning of each loop iteration, before printf is called:

0 < 10 == true
1 < 10 == true
2 < 10 == true
3 < 10 == true
4 < 10 == true
5 < 10 == true
6 < 10 == true
7 < 10 == true
8 < 10 == true
9 < 10 == true
10 < 10 == false    // exit from loop (printf not executed)
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+1,That's nice, but but my strategy is for $x < 1$= 2 and $x < 2$ = 3 then $x < n$ (by induction) testing is $n+1$ –  Quixotic Dec 30 '10 at 20:36

Your loop runs only if x < 10, so x is all values from 0-9, not 0-10. There are 10 values 0-9, so your loop runs 10 times.

Or if you're just talking about comparison, then yes it's test 11 times. Your module is incorrect.

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Yeah, saw that an added it about 5 seconds after you commented. :P –  Will Dec 30 '10 at 20:33
    
Okay I remove the -1 :) –  Quixotic Dec 30 '10 at 20:36

If you're not comfortable with debuggers, you can cheat:

int main() {
    int x;
    for(x=0;(printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
        printf("%d\n",x);
    return 0;
}

which prints

testing 0
0
testing 1
1
testing 2
2
testing 3
3
testing 4
4
testing 5
5
testing 6
6
testing 7
7
testing 8
8
testing 9
9
testing 10

If you want to do things the right way and learn to debug software in the process, start by reading this.

Here's a gdb session with the code above. You can count how many times the loop test line gets hit. It's 11.

$ gdb loop
GNU gdb (GDB) 7.0.1-debian
Copyright (C) 2009 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-linux-gnu".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/bugs/>...
Reading symbols from /home/nathan/c/loop...done.
(gdb) break 6
Breakpoint 1 at 0x4004ec: file loop.c, line 6.
(gdb) run
Starting program: /home/nathan/c/loop 

Breakpoint 1, main () at loop.c:6
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) n
testing 0
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
0
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 1
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
1
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 2
7                   printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
2
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 3
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
3
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 4
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
4
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 5
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
5
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 6
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
6
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 7
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
7
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 8
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
8
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 9
7               printf("%d\n",x);
(gdb) 
9
6           for(x=0; (printf("testing %d\n", x) || 1) && (x < 10); x++)
(gdb) 
testing 10
8           return 0;
(gdb) 
9       }
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+1 Lol! really this is nice,but as of now I better be happy with mathematical approaches :) –  Quixotic Dec 30 '10 at 20:48

If your question is about how many times expression x < 10 is evaluated, the answer is -- it depends. It depends on compiler optimization. If compiler generates naive code then it will evaluate it 11 times. If compiler completely unrolls your loop, the answer will be 0. Anything in between also possible.

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There are ten values at 0-9, but it will be tested 11 times, the last time returns false, exiting the loop.

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Yes. The TEST will be executed 11 times, the body only 10 times.

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for(x=0;x < 10; x++) 

X begins at zero but it ENDS at 9 because your code loops while x is less than 10 so to fix this here are a few solutions:

for(x=0;x <= 10; x++) 

and

for(x=0;x < 11; x++) 

These would both result in 11

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Hey, folks, that's far easier!

The for loop looks like:

loop

This gives that the condition is tested:

  • before the first iteration,
  • after each iteration.

Hence 10 interations gives 11 tests. Simple!

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10 times --

  1. Assign 0 to x
  2. Check if x < 0 is true, if not go to 6
  3. Execute loop body
  4. Increment x
  5. Go to 2.
  6. Code after the loop

If you go through it, you end up with the loop body being called 10 times, since the eleventh time the loop condition becomes false and the body is never executed.

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-1:Please check my question.Kindly edit your answer so that I can remove the -1. –  Quixotic Dec 30 '10 at 20:37
1  
My answer was more or less correct. I did overread the 'tested' part and '10' may be wrong, but the response is still valid, if you just took the time to read it, rather than telling people that you just downvoted them - this will definitely increase my motivation to respond to you in future. –  Alexander Gessler Dec 30 '10 at 21:12
1  
The point about your question is that you seem to be unaware of how a for loop works. My answer explains that. –  Alexander Gessler Dec 30 '10 at 21:14
1  
This answer is by far the best considering it refers to a newbie. I don't see a reason why it should be -2. +1 from me. –  GeorgeAl Dec 30 '10 at 21:26
    
The first line of your answer is 10 times which is not correct for my question and the rest explanation is not new to me. –  Quixotic Dec 31 '10 at 10:05

Yes, the x < 10 expression is evaluated 11 times. The first 10 times it is true and the final time it is false (because x==10).

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This is a brain teaser that normally gets asked in interview questions. An easy way to check is to change it from 10 to 1, i.e., the base case:

for (x = 0; x < 1; x++) printf("%d ", x);

It gets printed 1 time. When x = 1 it breaks out of the loop, and doesn't get included in the contents of the for loop. Therefore, it gets printed "x" times, not "x + 1" times.

Also, you can also think about it as doing this: for (x = 1; x < 2; x++)

It performs the loop contents when x = 1, but not x = 2 or (2 - 1) times. So the important thing to remember is when it actually breaks out of the loop, and which values for x are run within the loop contents.

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Are you serious? this should be intuitive!

x is tested n+1 times (where n is 10), but the condition is satisfied n times only because you are using the < operator*!

to see the effect:

int x;
for(x=0;x < 10; x++)
   printf("%d",x);
printf("%d",x);

the last print statement should output 10 which indicates that x is tested one more time (since we are starting from zero, x is actually tested 11 times).

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The last print statement will output 10 actually :P –  GeorgeAl Dec 30 '10 at 21:31
    
Yes, I knew it's due to reason of '<' besides for <= or anything else the inductive logic will work so ... –  Quixotic Dec 31 '10 at 10:08
    
@Muggen, you have an eagle eye! I did not test the code since I thought it is trivial, but, obviously I was mistaken, thanks for the correction :) –  H.Josef Jan 3 '11 at 2:40
    
no prob, I was not the one who downvote btw. –  GeorgeAl Jan 3 '11 at 13:26

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