Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Flex web app (compiled to regular SWF) that tries to connect to a (binary, not XML) socket on its own server. So if the swf is at example.com/app.swf, the socket is example.com:12869

This should be possible, AFAIK, but when I try to connect I get a security error saying that example.com/app.swf cannot access example.com:12869.

Even though it shouldn't be needed, I also have a crossdomain.xml file containing

<cross-domain-policy>
<allow-access-from domain="*" to-ports="*"/>
</cross-domain-policy>

but it doesn't help.

What can I do?

You can see the app here.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The thing is that by default Flash will request the policy from the socket, meaning it sends <policy-file-request/> to the Socket - if you have the possibility to add it to your server implementation, you can have a look at how that guy fixed the same sort of problem.

You can also use Security.loadPolicyFile("http://axa3.axastudios.nl/crossdomain.xml") before initiating the socket connection to force it to load your policy first. I'm not 100% sure if this works for Socket connections though, the docs (search for "Socket policy files") are slightly confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
I will try, of course, but why is that even necessary when the domains are the same? –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 30 '10 at 21:27
    
The port is not the same, and that means you're in a different context from a security sandbox point of view. –  Seldaek Dec 30 '10 at 21:31
    
Well, i've followed the docs, but it doesn't work quite yet. See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4570663/… –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 31 '10 at 14:59
    
Did you try the other way I mentionned? I mean just loading the xml file through your http server with Security.loadPolicyFile(). It seems to me like this could work. –  Seldaek Dec 31 '10 at 15:10
    
If that doesn't cut it, I guess the only way is to have your server running on port 12869 respond to the <policy-file-request/> with a policy, and then proceed to normal behavior. –  Seldaek Dec 31 '10 at 15:11

You could use my Apache 2 module - it listens at the port 843 and answers socket policy requests

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.