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I have a query:

select country_region, 
       country_subregion, 
       country_name, 
       calendar_year, 
       calendar_quarter_number, 
       sum(amount_sold) as amount
  from countries co join
       customers cu on co.country_id = cu.country_id join
       sales sa on cu.cust_id = sa.cust_id join
       times ti on sa.time_id = ti.time_id
 where (   co.country_region = 'Americas' 
        or co.country_region = 'Middle East'
       ) 
   and ti.calendar_year between 2000 and 2001
group by grouping sets 
(
    (country_region, country_subregion, country_name, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number),
    (country_region, country_subregion, country_name, calendar_year),
    (country_region, country_subregion, country_name),
    (country_region, country_subregion, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number),
    (country_region, country_subregion, calendar_year),
    (country_region, country_subregion),
    (country_region, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number),
    (country_region, calendar_year),
    (country_region),
    (calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number),
    (calendar_year),
    ()
)
order by amount desc;

What would be the query that returns the same output but uses group by rollup clause. I want to have a single query.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The equivalent query using the ROLLUP clause, is this:

select country_region
     , country_subregion
     , country_name
     , calendar_year
     , calendar_quarter_number
     , sum(amount_sold) as amount
  from countries co
       join customers cu on co.country_id = cu.country_id
       join sales sa on cu.cust_id = sa.cust_id
       join times ti on sa.time_id = ti.time_id
 where (  co.country_region='Americas'
       or co.country_region='Middle East'
       )
   and ti.calendar_year between 2000 and 2001
 group by rollup (country_region, country_subregion, country_name)
     , rollup (calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
 order by amount desc

Here is the proof:

 group by rollup (country_region, country_subregion, country_name)
     , rollup (calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)

equals

 group by grouping sets
       ( (country_region, country_subregion, country_name)
       , (country_region, country_subregion)
       , (country_region)
       , ()
       )
     , grouping sets
       ( (calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
       , (calendar_year)
       , ()
       )

which equals

 group by grouping sets
       ( (country_region, country_subregion, country_name, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
       , (country_region, country_subregion, country_name, calendar_year)
       , (country_region, country_subregion, country_name)
       , (country_region, country_subregion, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
       , (country_region, country_subregion, calendar_year)
       , (country_region, country_subregion)
       , (country_region, calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
       , (country_region, calendar_year)
       , (country_region)
       , (calendar_year, calendar_quarter_number)
       , (calendar_year)
       , ()
       )

which equals your original query.

You can find more information about the group by extensions in this article that I wrote last year: http://www.rwijk.nl/AboutOracle/All_About_Grouping.pdf

Regards, Rob.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, would it be possible to make an equivalent union of queries that use cube grouping? –  ZdenekSmetana Jan 2 '11 at 16:34
2  
No, that's not possible without an extra HAVING clause. And that's inefficient: calculating grouping sets and deleting them afterwards. –  Rob van Wijk Jan 3 '11 at 7:21
    
Your pdf overview on grouping was very useful. It's definitely a lot clearer explaining grouping sets before rollups/cubes. Thanks for making that available. –  alan Dec 12 '14 at 20:30

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