Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Continuing on from my previous question, I ran into another problem down the road. I realized not only should there be hashes within hashes, there can also be arrays within hashes. So the paths would be something like

one/two/three
one/two[]/three
one/two/four
one/two[]/four 

i.e. the hash is supposed to contain the array will always have a [] as its suffix. According to the script I'm using (slightly modified version of the answer of my previous question), the above paths would result in:

one => {
     two => {
         three => "",
         four => "",
     }
     two[] => [
         {
             three => "",
             four => "",
         }
     ]
}

The script I'm using is:

# !/usr/bin/perl

use Data::Dumper; 

sub insert {
  my ($ref, $head, @tail) = @_;
  if ( @tail ) { 
    if( $head !~ /^(.*)(\[\])$/ ) {
        insert( \%{$ref->{$head}}, @tail );
    } else {
        my %newhash = ();
        unshift(@{$ref->{$1 . $2}}, %newhash);
        insert( \%{$ref->{$1 . $2}[0]}, @tail );
    }
  } else {
    $ref->{$head} = '';
  }
}

my %hash;
chomp and insert \%hash, split( '/', $_ ) while <>;

print Dumper %hash;

What I'd like to do, is once I find two[], I'd like to delete two and add it to the array of two[] (if two exists) and then rename key two[] to two.

So the end result would look something like:

one => {
    two => [
        {
            three => "",
            four => "",
        },
        {
            three => "",
            four => "",
        }
    ]
}

So I tried adding checks within the if else for checking keys with or without [] suffixes but I got a range or errors like [$variable] is not a valid HASH reference, etc. How would one go about checking the type of the variable (eg $ref->{$head} is array?) and deleting and renaming keys of the hash efficiently?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Seems to me it's hard to build something simple and consistent if you can get both two and two[] at the same level. –  JB. Dec 30 '10 at 23:29
    
Yup, two and two[] will always be at the same level and can occur in random order eg(two, two[], two, etc. (that's how I got the hash reference error as I had already renamed two[] to two and encountered another two)) –  Gaurav Dadhania Dec 30 '10 at 23:34
    
Sorry, I still don't see how that structure is being constructed. Could you trace its contents after each line is processed, with explanation of why the changes happen there? –  JB. Dec 31 '10 at 0:25
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, by all rights, this should suck AND not do what you want - But I spent the last hour trying to get it somewhat right, so I'll be damned. Each 'anything[]' is an array of two elements, each a hashref: One for elements that appear after a bare 'anything', and the second for elements appearing after a 'anything[]'. I probably should have used a closure instead of relying on that crappy $is_non_bracket variable -- I'll take another look in the morning when I'm less retarded and more ashamed of writing this.

I think that it's tail-call optimized (the goto &SUB part). It also makes (small) use of named captures.

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use Data::Dumper;

sub construct {
    my $node = shift;
    return unless @_;
    my $next           = shift;
    my $is_non_bracket = 1;

    $next .= '[]' and $is_non_bracket-- if exists $node->{ $next . '[]' };
    if ( $next =~ / (?<node>[^\[\]]+) \Q[]/x ) {
        if ( exists $node->{ $+{node} } or not defined( $node->{$next} ) ) {
            push @{ $node->{$next} }, (delete $node->{ $+{node} } // {}); #/
         }
         unshift @_, $node->{$next}->[$is_non_bracket] ||= {};
    }
    else {
        $node->{$next} ||= @_ ? {} : $node->{$next};
        unshift @_, $node->{$next} //= @_ ? {} : ''; #/
    }
    goto &construct;
}


my %hash;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    construct( \%hash, split m!/! );
}

say Dumper \%hash;

__DATA__
one/two/three
one/two[]/three
one/two[]/three/four
one/two[]/three/four/five[]
one/two[]/three/four/whatever
one/two/ELEVAN
one/three/sixteen
one/three[]/whygodwhy
one/three/mrtest/mruho
one/three/mrtest/mruho[]/GAHAHAH

EDIT: Regex had an extra space after the quotemeta that made it break down; My bad.

EDIT2: Okay, it's the morning, edited in a version that isn't so stupid. No need for the ref, as we always pass a hashref; The #/ are there to stop the //'s from borking the highlighting.

EDIT3: Just noticed you DON'T want those [] to show up in the data structure, so here's a version that doesn't show them:

sub construct {
    my $node = shift;
    return unless @_;
    my $is_bracket = (my $next = shift) =~ s/\Q[]// || 0; 

    if (ref $node->{$next} eq 'ARRAY' or $is_bracket) {
        if ( ref $node->{ $next } ne 'ARRAY' ) {
            my $temp = delete $node->{ $next } || {};
            push @{ $node->{$next} = [] }, $temp;
         }
         unshift @_, $node->{$next}->[$is_bracket] ||= {};
    }
    else {
        $node->{$next} ||= @_ ? {} : $node->{$next};
        unshift @_, $node->{$next} //= @_ ? {} : ''; #/
    }
    goto &construct;
}

EDITNaN: Here's the gist of what it does: If there are enough arguments, we shift for a second time and put the value in the $next, which is promptly pulled into a substitution, which takes away its [], should it have any: If it does, the substitution returns 1, otherwise, s/// returns undef (or the empty string, I forget), so we use the logical-or to set the return value to 0; Either way, we set $is_bracket to this.

Afterwards, if $node->{$next} is an arrayref or $next had brackets: If $node->{$next} wasn't an arrayref (so we got here because $next had brackets, and it was the first time this has happened), it' either undef, the empty string, or a hashref; We delete whatever it is, and store it in $temp. We then set the now-empty $node->{$next} to an arrayref, and set(push) $temp as its first element - Meaning that, for instance, if 'two' had existed previous, and $next was originally 'two[]', then 'two' will now point to an arrayref, and its old value will be stored in [0]. Once $node->{$next} is an arrayref (or if it already was), we unshift the hashref in the index pointed by $is_backet - 0 if $next didn't have brackets, and 1 if it did - to @_. If the hashref doesn't exist (either because it's undef, for both, or possibly the empty string, for 0), we assign it an brand new hashref with the logical-or.

If it wasn't an arrayref, it's a hashref, so we do the same thing as before, and unshift the resulting value to @_.

We do all this unshifting because the magic goto passes our current @_ to the function that will replace us.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that - while I still do not completely understand how this works, I'll look forward to coding like that someday. To make it work, I manipulated the hash after it was created by renaming and deleting keys (not the most elegant solution, but it works). Thank you :) –  Gaurav Dadhania Jan 4 '11 at 3:26
    
Don't worry, I don't understand it myself : ) What the hell as I thinking, seriously. I'll type a small summary of what it should be doing in a couple of minutes and edit it in. –  Hugmeir Jan 4 '11 at 3:41
add comment

I'm not sure by what logic you reach your expected output, but I can clarify the following:

  • You can check the type of the reference by using the ref function.
  • In your current code, $ref is treated as a hash reference in every single case. I can tell because you dereference it as a hash using the $ref->{...} syntax in every single clause of your if statements.
  • If I read you correctly, $1 . $2 should be the same thing as $head. I find it more clear as just $head.
  • Your unshift line vivifies $ref->{$1 . $2} as an array reference (to an explicit empty array). And the next line vivifies its first element as a hash reference. The first line seems superfluous to me, you'd get the same results with the sole insert line; so I'm not sure of the intent.
share|improve this answer
    
> Re: $1 . $2 is same as $head when $head is .*[], that is correct, I was experimenting with using just $1 but that lead to problems in the if clause with line insert( \%{$ref->{$head}}, @tail );. –  Gaurav Dadhania Dec 31 '10 at 0:08
    
> Re using ref, I was using ref(\%{$ref->{$head}}) eq 'HASH' but that gave me errors as well if $ref->{$head} was an array. –  Gaurav Dadhania Dec 31 '10 at 0:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.