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I have an SQLite table that I need to sort. I am familiar with the ORDER BY command but this is not what I am trying to accomplish. I need the entire table sorted within the database.

Explanation:

My table uses a column called "rowid" which sets the order of the table (a key?). I need to sort the table by another column called "name" and then re-assign rowid numbers in alphabetical order according to 'name'. Can this be done?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks so much!

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It's not a good idea to name a column rowid. That already has a special meaning in SQLite. –  dan04 Dec 31 '10 at 21:17
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3 Answers

I think this issue relates to wanting the primary key to mean something. Avoid that trap. Choose an arbitrarily generated primary key that uniquely identifies a row of data and has no other meaning. Otherwise you will eventually run into the problem of wanting to alter the primary key values to preserve the meaning.

For a good explanation of why you should rely on ORDER BY to retrieve the data in the desired order instead of assuming the data will otherwise appear in a sequence determined by the primary key see Cruachan's answer to a similar question

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Assuming you created your original table like so:

CREATE TABLE my_table (rowid INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, name TEXT, somedata TEXT) ;

You can create another sorted table like so:

CREATE TABLE my_ordered_table (rowid INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, name TEXT, somedata TEXT) ;

INSERT INTO my_ordered_table (name, somedata) SELECT name,somedata FROM my_table ORDER BY name ;

And if you then want to replace the orignal table:

DROP TABLE my_table ;

ALTER TABLE my_ordered_table RENAME TO my_table;

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