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I am hoping to clarify the processes going on here.

I have created a subclass of UIButton whose init method looks like this:

- (id)initWithTitle:(NSString *)title frame:(CGRect)btnFrame {
    self = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
    [self setTitle:title forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    self.frame = btnFrame;
    return self;
}

In my view controller I am creating one of these buttons and adding it as a subview:

myButton = [[CustomButton alloc] initWithTitle:@"Title" frame:someFrame];
[self.view addSubview:myButton];

In the view controller's dealloc method I log the retain count of my button:

- (void)dealloc {
    NSLog(@"RC: %d", [myButton retainCount]); //RC = 2
    [super dealloc];
    NSLog(@"RC: %d", [myButton retainCount]); //RC = 1
}

The way I understand it, myButton is not actually retained, even though I invoked it using alloc, because in my subclass I created an autorelease button (using buttonWithType:).

In dealloc, does this mean that, when dealloc is called the superview releases the button and its retain count goes down to 1? The button has not yet been autoreleased?

Or do I need to get that retain count down to zero after calling [super dealloc]?

Cheers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is more than a little bit tricky. I have summarized my answer in 5 parts:

  1. Creating a custom init method that returns a different object
  2. WARNING: beware of illegal memory access!
  3. How to properly transfer ownership of the button to its parent view
  4. Specific answers to specific questions
  5. A suggestion for improvement

Part 1 : Creating a custom init method that returns a different object:

This is an example of a very special case, namely that the object returned from -initWithTitle:frame: is not the same "object" that was sent the message in the first place.

Normally speaking, the process goes like this:

instance = [Class alloc];
[instance init];
...
[instance release];

Of course, the alloc and init calls are usually grouped together into one line of code. The key thing to notice here is that the "object" (nothing more than an allocated block of memory at this point) which receives the call to init has already been allocated. If you return a different object (as in your example), you are responsible for releasing that original block of memory.

The next step would be to return a new object that has the proper retain count. Since you are using a factory method (+buttonWithType:), the resulting object has been autoreleased, and you must retain it to set the proper retain count.

Edit: A proper -init method should explicitly test to make sure that it is working with a properly initialized object before it does anything else with that object. This test was missing from my answer, but present in bbum's answer.

Here is how your init method should look:

- (id)initWithTitle:(NSString *)title frame:(CGRect)btnFrame {
    [self release]; // discard the original "self"
    self = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
    if (self == nil) { return nil; }
    [self retain]; // set the proper retain count
    [self setTitle:title forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    self.frame = btnFrame;
    return self;
}

Part 2: WARNING: beware of illegal memory access!

If you are allocating an instance of CustomButton, and then replacing it with an instance of UIButton, you could easily cause some very subtle memory errors. Let's say CustomButton has some ivars:

@class CustomButton : UIButton
{
    int someVar;
    int someOtherVar;
}
...
@end;

Now, when you replace the allocated CustomButton with an instance of UIButton in your custom init... method, you are returning a block of memory that is too small to hold a CustomButton, but your code will continue to treat this block of code as if it is a full-sized CustomButton. Uh oh.

For example, the following code is now very, very bad:

- (id)initWithTitle:(NSString *)title frame:(CGRect)btnFrame {
    [self release]; // discard the original "self"
    self = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
    [self retain]; // set the proper retain count

    someOtherVar = 10; // danger, Will Robinson!

    return self;
}

Part 3: How to properly transfer ownership of the button to its parent view:

As for your view controller's dealloc method, you will have to call [myButton release] if you have initialized the button as shown. This is to follow the rule that you must release anything that you alloc, retain or copy. A better way to deal with this issue is to let the controller's view take ownership of that button (which it does automatically when you add the button as a subview):

myButton = [[CustomButton alloc] initWithTitle:@"Title"
                                         frame:someFrame]; // RC = 1
[self.view addSubview:myButton];                           // RC = 2
[myButton release];                                        // RC = 1

Now, you never have to worry about releasing that button again. The view owns it, and will release it when the view itself is deallocated.


Part 4: Specific answers to specific questions:

Q: The way I understand it, myButton is not actually retained, even though I invoked it using alloc, because in my subclass I created an autorelease button (using buttonWithType:).

Correct.

Q: In dealloc, does this mean that, when dealloc is called the superview releases the button and its retain count goes down to 1? The button has not yet been autoreleased?

Also correct.

Q: Or do I need to get that retain count down to zero after calling [super dealloc]?

Sort of :) The retain count may or may not drop down to zero at the point when you log it. Autoreleased objects may still have a retain count of one, since they effectively belong to the autorelease pool for the current run loop. For that matter, the view itself may still belong to a window which has not yet been released. The only thing you really need to worry about is balancing out your own memory management. See Apple's memory management guide for details. From the point of view of your viewController, you have allocated the button once, so you must release it exactly once. When it comes to your custom init... method, things get a little bit trickier, but the principle is the same. A block of memory has been allocated, so it must be released (part 1), and, (part 2) init should return an object with a retain count of one (to be properly released later on).


Part 5: A suggestion for improvement:

You could avoid most of the custom initializer mess by simply creating your own factory method in the same spirit as the one provided by UIButton:

+ (id)buttonWithTitle:(NSString *)title frame:(CGRect)btnFrame {
    UIButton * button = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
    [button setTitle:title forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    button.frame = btnFrame;
    return button;
}

Note that this approach can still result in memory access errors as identified in part 2

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@bbum: which explanation is incorrect? This has become a very long answer, and I'm not certain which part you are referring to :) –  e.James Dec 31 '10 at 6:07
    
@bbum: point taken about the absolute retain count being useless. I used them only to illustrate the implicit retain in addSubview:. –  e.James Dec 31 '10 at 6:09
    
Sorry -- the retain counts across the initializers were correct (save for the absolute retain count discussion). And the rest of your answer -- though quite long :) -- is quite good. –  bbum Dec 31 '10 at 6:12
    
Thank you. :) I am especially concerned about the possibility of illegal memory access. It occurs to me that this can get messy very fast. –  e.James Dec 31 '10 at 6:15

This deserves two answers.... one for the specific question and one for how memory is managed when the instance is replaced in -init (this one).

Initializers are an odd bird in the Objective-C memory management world. In effect, you are managing self. On entry, self is retained. On exit, you are expected to return either a retained object -- doesn't have to be the same object as self -- or nil.

So, breaking the standard idiom of [[[Foo alloc] init] autorelease] down:

id x = [Foo alloc]; // allocates instance with RC +1
x = [x init]; // RC is preserved, but x may differ
[x autorelease]; // RC -1 (sometime in future)

Note that all retain counts [RC] are expressed as deltas.

Thus, in the init method, you typically don't change the retain count of self at all!

However, if you want to return some other object, you need to release self and retain whatever you are going to return (whether allocated then or previously allocated somewhere else, say when an object is retrieved from a cache).

Specifically, with everything blown out into individual expressions because this answer is being overly pedantic:

- init {
    [self release];
    self = nil;
    id newObject = [SomeClass alloc];
    newObject = [newObject init];
    if (newObject) {
        self = newObject;
        ... initialize self here, if that is your fancy ...
    }
    return self;
}
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+1 for being succinct! –  e.James Dec 31 '10 at 6:16
    
+1 As you had a perfect reason to point me I am wrong –  EmptyStack Dec 31 '10 at 6:45

First:

Do not call retainCount

The absolute retain count of an object is next to useless. There are always better ways to reason about memory management in your application.


Next:

Your initWithTitle:frame: method is allocating and returning an instance of UIButton, not an instance of the subclass. If that is what you want, there is no need for a subclass at all.

If you really want an instance of a subclass of UIButton, that is going to be more difficult. A quick google search and a read of the documentation indicates that UIButton really isn't intended to be subclassed.

I just tried:

@interface FooButton:UIButton
@end
@implementation FooButton
@end

FooButton *f = [FooButton buttonWithType: UIButtonTypeDetailDisclosure];
NSLog(@"%@", f);

And it printed:

<UIButton: 0x9d03fa0; frame = (0 0; 29 31); opaque = NO; layer = <CALayer: 0x9d040a0>>

I.e. the sole method to be used to create UIButton instances quite explicitly does not allocate via [self class]. You could go down the path of trying to initialize the instance by hand ala UIView or UIControl, but that is likely a lot of trouble.

What are you trying to do?

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