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I have been using .NET since beta and HTML since the days of HotDog pro & notepad, using table layout of course. I am FINALLY ready to use only div, li, CSS for the layout, but my question is, what is the proper way to layout pages in VS2010?

When i use table layout its simple and i can visually see what im creating and where the elements are, such as the sample below - how should I do this using div's, etc in VS2010?

<table width="300" border="0" cellpadding="5">
  <tr>
    <td><img src="http://assets.devx.com/MS_Azure/azuremcau.jpg" alt="blah" width="70" height="70" /></td>
    <td><h2>This is some text to the right of the picture...</h2></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Here some text underneath</td>
  </tr>
</table>
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2  
What you want to learn is CSS float and the box model. I'm not a CSS expert, so not sure what to tell you. – jcolebrand Dec 31 '10 at 5:27
    
Im hoping not to step back to the time of coding in Notepad and utilize the tools (like VS, Dreamweaver) to layout the pages Quickly w/o having to specify top and left for every element (if thats possible) – CrustyApple Dec 31 '10 at 5:39
1  
I think Dreamweaver is one of the better WYSIWYG tools in terms of not inserting a ton a junk HTML. We have several "HTML Programmers" at my work who use this. – dana Dec 31 '10 at 6:23

I would say that you should learn about Css and use divs etc to layout pages. In my opinion you should not use any WYSIWYG and write the markup from scratch, it's just as fast if you know how. Or if you want a good basic css framework for dealing with the layout in a grid-like way then try out 960 Grid System.

As for seeing what you are doing I would say use the simplest. open the site in a webbrowser and hit refresh.

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1  
+1 Nicely said! – Chuck Conway Dec 31 '10 at 10:33

Here is an example of a masterpage in ASP.NET MVC that uses the Blueprint CSS framework.

It has two columns next to each other with a footer underneath it.

 <%@ Master Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewMasterPage" %><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
            "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
          <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="en" xml:lang="en">

    <head runat="server">
        <title><asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="TitleContent" runat="server" /></title>

        <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="MetaDescription" runat="server" >
        </asp:ContentPlaceHolder>

        <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="MetaKeywords" runat="server">
        </asp:ContentPlaceHolder>

        <meta http-equiv="Content-type" content="text/html;charset=UTF-8" /> 


         <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="HeadContent" runat="server"/>

    </head>

    <%=Html.Flash() %>

    <body>
        <div id="flash" style="display:none"></div>

        <div class="container">

            <div id="main" class="span-24 last">

                <div class="span-5">

                    <div id="logo">

                    </div>

                    <% Html.RenderAction("MainMenu", "Cms"); %>

                </div>


                 <div class="span-19 last">

                    <div id="headerTekst">
                        <div class="padding-30">
                            <h1 class="right uppercase">Some text</h1>
                        </div>
                    </div>

                    <div class="padding-10">
                        <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="MainContent" runat="server" />
                     </div>
                 </div>

                <div class="clear"></div>  
            </div>



            <div id="footer" class="span-24 last">

            </div>
    </div>  


    </body>

    </html>
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To write html code you should definetly not use at all Visual Studio. Use Dreamweaver instead.

When designing the page's layout you will get a far better tool with Adobe's Dreamweaver using design view than using Visual Studio.

Only when it's time to program the page to make it dynamic is when you should open your IDE and write code.

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1  
There is no reason not to use Visual Studio when coding HTML/CSS it does a fine job. – Chuck Conway Dec 31 '10 at 10:32

For layout I use Firefox with the FireBug plugin. It's gives you real-time feedback. It does not get any better. Once I have the change dialed in, I copy the change in to the html or css in the project.

WYSIWYG programs are fine. It's how I learned. Like everything else, eventually you'll want to know what's happening under the hood.

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If you need to use browsers that support HTML 4.01 then go with divs, but if your layouts get too complex you will eventually fall captive to div soup and understanding your markup and making changes will become cumbersome.

If you can use modern browsers that support HTML 5 (or add various hacks to make it work) I would go this route since your markup will have more semantic meaning and be easier to understand. Instead of making a nav like this:

<div class="nav">
   <ul>
       <li>Home</li>
       <li>About</li>
   </ul>
</div>

You could use HTML5 to have:

<nav>
    <ul>
       <li>Home</li>
       <li>About</li>
   </ul>
</nav>

Or if you were posting blogs instead of doing this:

<div class="post">
<h1>Example Blog Post</h1>
   <div class="entry">
      <p>Blog text goes here...</p>
   </div>
   <div class="entryFooter">
      <p> Posted in example category.</p>
   </div>
</div>

You would write it like this:

<article>
   <header>
      <h1>Example Blog Post</h1>
   </header>
   <p>Blog text goes here...</p>
   <footer>
      <p>Posted in example category.</p>
   </footer>
</article>

As you can see it is a lot easier to understand and still gives the structure you are looking for over tables.

To then position everything like you would want I would use CSS3, but again if you need to support older browsers use CSS2.

To do this in VS2010, simply open up the .aspx or .ascx pages and start writing the markup. I find products like Dreamweaver to produce garbage markup when using a designer interface, so the best bet is to write it yourself by hand.

Also, if you do go the HTML5 route and want intellisense in VS2010, here is an addon for it.

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