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I have a number of tables with the same columns and it would look a lot nicer if they shared the same column widths. Is such a thing possible? Putting them in the same table with some rows with no borders between them isn't an option.

Edit: Yeah I'm aware I can fix the widths myself but I was hoping for something that would tie in to the browser's column width algorithm but simply tied two or more tables together for the purpose of doing that layout.

I didn't think such a thing was possible but I thought I'd check just in case.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's only possible if you can fix-width the columns. If you can set a fixed width then some css like this should work:

td {
    width: 25%;
}

You can customize each columns width like this:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td class="col1">...</td>
    <td class="col2">...</td>
  </tr>
</table>
...
<table>
  <tr>
    <td class="col1">...</td>
    <td class="col2">...</td>
  </tr>
</table>

and then specify the widths like this:

.col1 {
   width: 25%;
}
.col2 {
   width: 75%;
}
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Err, no it isn't the only way. Please see my answer! –  Robert K Jan 19 '09 at 19:42

If you're not too picky about which column widths the browser comes up with, as long as they're the same across different tables, you can use the CSS table-layout property (supported by all major browsers) in combination with a table width:

table {
    table-layout: fixed;
    width: 100%;
}

This causes all columns (without a specified width) to have the same width, regardless of the table content.

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Here's a small JavaScript I made to resize cells to make them equal width in all tables on a page.

function resizeTables()
{
    var tableArr = document.getElementsByTagName('table');
    var cellWidths = new Array();

    // get widest
    for(i = 0; i < tableArr.length; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < tableArr[i].rows[0].cells.length; j++)
        {
           var cell = tableArr[i].rows[0].cells[j];

           if(!cellWidths[j] || cellWidths[j] < cell.clientWidth)
                cellWidths[j] = cell.clientWidth;
        }
    }

    // set all columns to the widest width found
    for(i = 0; i < tableArr.length; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < tableArr[i].rows[0].cells.length; j++)
        {
            tableArr[i].rows[0].cells[j].style.width = cellWidths[j]+'px';
        }
    }
}

window.onload = resizeTables;
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This works for me. Thanks Ole. –  tofutim Dec 16 '12 at 8:08

To expand on Ken's answer, you can also specify the exact widths in pixels:

td { width: 250px }

or ems (width of the letter m):

td { width: 32em }

or ex or pt or whatever (well...actually %, pt, px, em, ex might be it). If you need your columns to be different widths, then the easy way is to give the table cells classes:

<table><tr>
    <td class="col1">...</td><td class="col2">...</td>...
</tr></table>

and assign column widths to the classes:

td.col1 { width: 48em }
td.col2 { width: 200px }
...

It should be sufficient to assign column widths to the first row in each table. [edit: looks like I've been scooped on that while I was writing]

You could probably also go crazy with the CSS 2 sibling selector, and write something like

tr > td:first-child { width:48em } /* first column */
tr > td:first-child + td { width: 200px } /* second column */
tr > td:first-child + td + td { width: 5% } /* third column  */
...

but if you have more than a few columns, that could get ugly. And if you're using some sort of template system or script to generate these tables, I'm sure it'll be easier/clearer to just put the class="col#" attribute on each cell in your template once.

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That sibling selector is unsupported on a few browsers I think. Probably unsupported on IE6, maybe even IE7. –  cletus Jan 19 '09 at 8:55
    
Yep, it works on browsers that follow the W3C standard for CSS. IE6 and 7 generally don't follow the standards, but IE8 might. (Firefox and most minor browsers do, of course.) –  David Z Jan 19 '09 at 9:20
    
The adjacent sibling selector and :first-child pseudo-class do work in IE7; not in IE6. But I think this a prime example of something you can drop for IE6, unless you specifically need to support IE6 (e.g. on an intranet). Nothing would break without it. It would just not look as nice. –  mercator Jan 19 '09 at 21:31

Luis Siquot answer is the one I used. However instead of using clientWidth, you should use jquery width() function to normalize widths between browsers, and to not calculate padding. Using clientWidth would result in the table cells expanding on ajaxpostbacks because of the padding (if padding used in the TD's). So, correct code using Luis Siquot's answer would be to replace

var cell = $(this)[0].rows[0].cells[j];
       if(!cellWidths[j] || cellWidths[j] < cell.clientWidth) cellWidths[j] = cell.clientWidth;

with

var cell = $($(this)[0].rows[0].cells[j]);
            if (!cellWidths[j] || cellWidths[j] < cell.width()) cellWidths[j] = cell.width();   
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I'm almost shocked that no one has suggested column groups! With it you can give a column a specific class, width, and other helpful properties. And since it's HTML 4.01 it's supported by all browsers that support the doctype.

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I believe colgroups aren't supported by IE, no? –  Paolo Bergantino Jan 19 '09 at 22:23
    
Maybe I'm missing something but how to colgroups actually help for this problem? –  cletus Jan 19 '09 at 22:59
    
As far as I know, colgroups are supported by IE. As a part of the standard they ought to be ... but the IE team thinks that they're special. –  Robert K Jan 21 '09 at 19:09
    
Cletus: if there are a uniform number of columns, you can apply to all relevant tables the colgroup. Even by javascript if you wish. –  Robert K Jan 21 '09 at 19:10
5  
But this is just another variation on fixing the widths of all the tables/columns, yes? –  cletus Jan 21 '09 at 22:59

each pair of tables resize its coluns to the same width
similar to Ole J. Helgesen but with jquery and a parameter in order to select which tables equalize.
(I cant vote but is esentialy your solution)

<table ss="1" border="1">
  <tr><td>asdf<td>129292<td>text
</table>
<table ss="1" border=1>
  <tr><td>a<td>1<td>each column here has the same size than the table above
</table>
<table ss="2" border=1>
  <tr><td>asdf<td>129292<td>text
</table>
<table ss="2" border=1>
  <tr><td>each column here has the same size than the table above<td>a<td>1
</table>

and use this sctipt

$(function(){
  resizeTables('1');
  resizeTables('2');
});

//please set table html atribute ss="something" to propely call this js
// ss shorts for ShareSize
function resizeTables(sharedSize){
  var tableArr = $('table[ss='+sharedSize+']');
  var cellWidths = new Array();
  $(tableArr).each(function() {
    for(j = 0; j < $(this)[0].rows[0].cells.length; j++){
       var cell = $(this)[0].rows[0].cells[j];
       if(!cellWidths[j] || cellWidths[j] < cell.clientWidth) cellWidths[j] = cell.clientWidth;
    }
  });
  $(tableArr).each(function() {
    for(j = 0; j < $(this)[0].rows[0].cells.length; j++){
        $(this)[0].rows[0].cells[j].style.width = cellWidths[j]+'px';
    }
  });
}
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