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Task: Print numbers from 1 to 1000 without using any loop or conditional statements. Don't just write the printf() or cout statement 1000 times.

How would you do that using C or C++?

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locked by Will Jun 26 '13 at 20:01

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137  
The obvious answer is to use 500 calls to printf and print two numbers each time, no? –  James McNellis Dec 31 '10 at 6:59
283  
The real answer is "don't work there". –  Etienne de Martel Dec 31 '10 at 7:00
77  
Why do interview questions always want you to write code that you shouldn't realistically write in application? –  birryree Dec 31 '10 at 7:01
433  
printf("numbers from 1 to 1000"); –  jondavidjohn Dec 31 '10 at 7:07
127  
The interview your chance to shine. Tell them "Without loops or conditionals? Child's play. I can do it without a computer!" Then pull out pen and notepad. They may give you a confused look, but just explain that if you can't count on built in language constructs, you really can't assume anything. –  JohnFx Dec 31 '10 at 18:40
show 34 more comments

106 Answers 106

up vote 789 down vote accepted
+100

Compile time recursion! :P

#include <iostream>
template<int N>
struct NumberGeneration{
  static void out(std::ostream& os)
  {
    NumberGeneration<N-1>::out(os);
    os << N << std::endl;
  }
};
template<>
struct NumberGeneration<1>{
  static void out(std::ostream& os)
  {
    os << 1 << std::endl;
  }
};
int main(){
   NumberGeneration<1000>::out(std::cout);
}
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286  
+1. Of course, implementing a compiler that doesn't use loops or conditionals is left as an exercise for the reader. :P –  Matthew Flaschen Dec 31 '10 at 7:03
9  
@Motti : No I am not ideone.com/A0ZQZ –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 31 '10 at 7:13
28  
@Zack: Let's get real, we're printing 1,000 lines from a program written to deliberately avoid loops. Performance is not an issue. –  dreamlax Jan 3 '11 at 11:49
42  
For those curious enough to compile this: in g++, set -ftemplate-depth-1000. The default template recursion maximum is 500. –  Tom Jan 3 '11 at 18:47
10  
@dreamlax: It's just one of those things I have learned from experience over the years: use '\n' unless you really want to flush, use ++i unless you actually need the former value of i, pass by const reference unless you have a good reason not to... When developers stop thinking about these (or never even start), they will, sooner or later, run into a problem where this matters, only they didn't even know there's spots where it might matter. –  sbi Jan 30 '11 at 23:43
show 30 more comments

This one actually compiles to assembly that doesn't have any conditionals:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void main(int j) {
  printf("%d\n", j);
  (&main + (&exit - &main)*(j/1000))(j+1);
}


Edit: Added '&' so it will consider the address hence evading the pointer errors.

This version of the above in standard C, since it doesn't rely on arithmetic on function pointers:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void f(int j)
{
    static void (*const ft[2])(int) = { f, exit };

    printf("%d\n", j);
    ft[j/1000](j + 1);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    f(1);
}
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17  
Well, the code in this answer is obviously neither C nor C++, so this is fine only if we scrap the requirement. Then any answer may qualify because a hypothetical compiler might just produce the required program from any input. –  eq- Jan 3 '11 at 19:34
16  
I would really love an explanation of how and why this works, myself... –  PP. Jan 4 '11 at 13:48
321  
@PP, that's quite lengthy to explain, but basically, j is initially 1 because it's actually argc, which is 1 if the program is called without arguments. Then, j/1000 is 0 until j becomes 1000, after which it's 1. (exit - main) is, of course, the difference between the addresses of exit() and main(). That means (main + (exit - main)*(j/1000)) is main() until j becomes 1000, after which it becomes exit(). The end result is that main() is called when the program starts, then calls itself recursively 999 times while incrementing j, then calls exit(). Whew :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 4 '11 at 19:16
13  
@Mark: this is non standard signature of main, you're disallowed to call main recursively, and the result of subtracting function pointers is undefined. –  ybungalobill Jan 17 '11 at 10:03
9  
Yeah, yeah, it's not strictly legal C++ code for the reasons @ybungalobill gives, but I have to +1 for sheer insanity and the fact that it does compile and work on a few platforms. There are times when the correct response to "But it's not standard!" is "Who cares!" :) –  j_random_hacker Jan 26 '11 at 8:26
show 24 more comments
#include <stdio.h>
int i = 0;
p()    { printf("%d\n", ++i); }
a()    { p();p();p();p();p(); }
b()    { a();a();a();a();a(); }
c()    { b();b();b();b();b(); }
main() { c();c();c();c();c();c();c();c(); return 0; }

I'm surprised nobody seems to have posted this -- I thought it was the most obvious way. 1000 = 5*5*5*8.

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23  
Such a simple an elegant way, Darius! :) Thanks! –  raghava Jan 3 '11 at 6:09
1  
@Chris, they use the same logic expressed in macros or templates, blowing up the code size, right? You might as well generate the output string itself instead of a thousand printfs. –  Darius Bacon Jan 3 '11 at 8:44
43  
Well, nice effort, but rather odd that you didn't decompose 8 into 2*2*2 and thus use the unique prime factorisation –  David Heffernan Apr 11 '11 at 10:08
8  
Reminds me on the brainfuck language. –  vsz Apr 22 '12 at 17:03
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Looks like it doesn't need to use loops

printf("1 10 11 100 101 110 111 1000\n");
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1  
one might argue that using copy is cheating –  John Dibling Dec 31 '10 at 15:51
13  
@Johannes actually I'm pretty sure printf has a loop :p –  icecrime Dec 31 '10 at 16:18
1  
@litb: Note I didn't say that "using copy is cheating" –  John Dibling Dec 31 '10 at 17:31
2  
@John : copying is cheating. do you doubt it? :P –  Nawaz Jan 2 '11 at 18:17
33  
+1 for the binary version. –  Christian Rau Aug 8 '11 at 12:50
show 6 more comments

Here are three solutions that I know. The second might be argued though.

// compile time recursion
template<int N> void f1()
{ 
    f1<N-1>(); 
    cout << N << '\n'; 
}

template<> void f1<1>() 
{ 
    cout << 1 << '\n'; 
}

// short circuiting (not a conditional statement)
void f2(int N)
{ 
    N && (f2(N-1), cout << N << '\n');
}

// constructors!
struct A {
    A() {
        static int N = 1;
        cout << N++ << '\n';
    }
};

int main()
{
    f1<1000>();
    f2(1000);
    delete[] new A[1000]; // (3)
    A data[1000]; // (4) added by Martin York
}

[ Edit: (1) and (4) can be used for compile time constants only, (2) and (3) can be used for runtime expressions too — end edit. ]

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91  
+1 I like that constructor one. –  birryree Dec 31 '10 at 7:46
5  
Also, I'd argue about a short-circuit not being a conditional... Not a statement, true, but a conditional expression, I'd say. Provided we define a conditional expression as "something which yields conditional jumps in assembler". –  Kos Dec 31 '10 at 17:07
5  
@Kos: It's not standard C++. –  GManNickG Dec 31 '10 at 22:53
6  
@Joseph - The constructor one shouldn't be affected by what order the individual objects are initiated, but it is a good question. –  Chris Lutz Jan 3 '11 at 2:40
12  
@Joseph this is defined by 12.6/3 (C++03). Initialization is done in subscription order. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 3 '11 at 9:56
show 8 more comments

I'm not writing the printf statement 1000 times!

printf("1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6\n7\n8\n9\n10\n11\n12\n13\n14\n15\n16\n17\n18\n19\n20\n21\n22\n23\n24\n25\n26\n27\n28\n29\n30\n31\n32\n33\n34\n35\n36\n37\n38\n39\n40\n41\n42\n43\n44\n45\n46\n47\n48\n49\n50\n51\n52\n53\n54\n55\n56\n57\n58\n59\n60\n61\n62\n63\n64\n65\n66\n67\n68\n69\n70\n71\n72\n73\n74\n75\n76\n77\n78\n79\n80\n81\n82\n83\n84\n85\n86\n87\n88\n89\n90\n91\n92\n93\n94\n95\n96\n97\n98\n99\n100\n101\n102\n103\n104\n105\n106\n107\n108\n109\n110\n111\n112\n113\n114\n115\n116\n117\n118\n119\n120\n121\n122\n123\n124\n125\n126\n127\n128\n129\n130\n131\n132\n133\n134\n135\n136\n137\n138\n139\n140\n141\n142\n143\n144\n145\n146\n147\n148\n149\n150\n151\n152\n153\n154\n155\n156\n157\n158\n159\n160\n161\n162\n163\n164\n165\n166\n167\n168\n169\n170\n171\n172\n173\n174\n175\n176\n177\n178\n179\n180\n181\n182\n183\n184\n185\n186\n187\n188\n189\n190\n191\n192\n193\n194\n195\n196\n197\n198\n199\n200\n201\n202\n203\n204\n205\n206\n207\n208\n209\n210\n211\n212\n213\n214\n215\n216\n217\n218\n219\n220\n221\n222\n223\n224\n225\n226\n227\n228\n229\n230\n231\n232\n233\n234\n235\n236\n237\n238\n239\n240\n241\n242\n243\n244\n245\n246\n247\n248\n249\n250\n251\n252\n253\n254\n255\n256\n257\n258\n259\n260\n261\n262\n263\n264\n265\n266\n267\n268\n269\n270\n271\n272\n273\n274\n275\n276\n277\n278\n279\n280\n281\n282\n283\n284\n285\n286\n287\n288\n289\n290\n291\n292\n293\n294\n295\n296\n297\n298\n299\n300\n301\n302\n303\n304\n305\n306\n307\n308\n309\n310\n311\n312\n313\n314\n315\n316\n317\n318\n319\n320\n321\n322\n323\n324\n325\n326\n327\n328\n329\n330\n331\n332\n333\n334\n335\n336\n337\n338\n339\n340\n341\n342\n343\n344\n345\n346\n347\n348\n349\n350\n351\n352\n353\n354\n355\n356\n357\n358\n359\n360\n361\n362\n363\n364\n365\n366\n367\n368\n369\n370\n371\n372\n373\n374\n375\n376\n377\n378\n379\n380\n381\n382\n383\n384\n385\n386\n387\n388\n389\n390\n391\n392\n393\n394\n395\n396\n397\n398\n399\n400\n401\n402\n403\n404\n405\n406\n407\n408\n409\n410\n411\n412\n413\n414\n415\n416\n417\n418\n419\n420\n421\n422\n423\n424\n425\n426\n427\n428\n429\n430\n431\n432\n433\n434\n435\n436\n437\n438\n439\n440\n441\n442\n443\n444\n445\n446\n447\n448\n449\n450\n451\n452\n453\n454\n455\n456\n457\n458\n459\n460\n461\n462\n463\n464\n465\n466\n467\n468\n469\n470\n471\n472\n473\n474\n475\n476\n477\n478\n479\n480\n481\n482\n483\n484\n485\n486\n487\n488\n489\n490\n491\n492\n493\n494\n495\n496\n497\n498\n499\n500\n501\n502\n503\n504\n505\n506\n507\n508\n509\n510\n511\n512\n513\n514\n515\n516\n517\n518\n519\n520\n521\n522\n523\n524\n525\n526\n527\n528\n529\n530\n531\n532\n533\n534\n535\n536\n537\n538\n539\n540\n541\n542\n543\n544\n545\n546\n547\n548\n549\n550\n551\n552\n553\n554\n555\n556\n557\n558\n559\n560\n561\n562\n563\n564\n565\n566\n567\n568\n569\n570\n571\n572\n573\n574\n575\n576\n577\n578\n579\n580\n581\n582\n583\n584\n585\n586\n587\n588\n589\n590\n591\n592\n593\n594\n595\n596\n597\n598\n599\n600\n601\n602\n603\n604\n605\n606\n607\n608\n609\n610\n611\n612\n613\n614\n615\n616\n617\n618\n619\n620\n621\n622\n623\n624\n625\n626\n627\n628\n629\n630\n631\n632\n633\n634\n635\n636\n637\n638\n639\n640\n641\n642\n643\n644\n645\n646\n647\n648\n649\n650\n651\n652\n653\n654\n655\n656\n657\n658\n659\n660\n661\n662\n663\n664\n665\n666\n667\n668\n669\n670\n671\n672\n673\n674\n675\n676\n677\n678\n679\n680\n681\n682\n683\n684\n685\n686\n687\n688\n689\n690\n691\n692\n693\n694\n695\n696\n697\n698\n699\n700\n701\n702\n703\n704\n705\n706\n707\n708\n709\n710\n711\n712\n713\n714\n715\n716\n717\n718\n719\n720\n721\n722\n723\n724\n725\n726\n727\n728\n729\n730\n731\n732\n733\n734\n735\n736\n737\n738\n739\n740\n741\n742\n743\n744\n745\n746\n747\n748\n749\n750\n751\n752\n753\n754\n755\n756\n757\n758\n759\n760\n761\n762\n763\n764\n765\n766\n767\n768\n769\n770\n771\n772\n773\n774\n775\n776\n777\n778\n779\n780\n781\n782\n783\n784\n785\n786\n787\n788\n789\n790\n791\n792\n793\n794\n795\n796\n797\n798\n799\n800\n801\n802\n803\n804\n805\n806\n807\n808\n809\n810\n811\n812\n813\n814\n815\n816\n817\n818\n819\n820\n821\n822\n823\n824\n825\n826\n827\n828\n829\n830\n831\n832\n833\n834\n835\n836\n837\n838\n839\n840\n841\n842\n843\n844\n845\n846\n847\n848\n849\n850\n851\n852\n853\n854\n855\n856\n857\n858\n859\n860\n861\n862\n863\n864\n865\n866\n867\n868\n869\n870\n871\n872\n873\n874\n875\n876\n877\n878\n879\n880\n881\n882\n883\n884\n885\n886\n887\n888\n889\n890\n891\n892\n893\n894\n895\n896\n897\n898\n899\n900\n901\n902\n903\n904\n905\n906\n907\n908\n909\n910\n911\n912\n913\n914\n915\n916\n917\n918\n919\n920\n921\n922\n923\n924\n925\n926\n927\n928\n929\n930\n931\n932\n933\n934\n935\n936\n937\n938\n939\n940\n941\n942\n943\n944\n945\n946\n947\n948\n949\n950\n951\n952\n953\n954\n955\n956\n957\n958\n959\n960\n961\n962\n963\n964\n965\n966\n967\n968\n969\n970\n971\n972\n973\n974\n975\n976\n977\n978\n979\n980\n981\n982\n983\n984\n985\n986\n987\n988\n989\n990\n991\n992\n993\n994\n995\n996\n997\n998\n999\n1000\n");

You're welcome ;)

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223  
I hope you wrote a program to generate that line. –  Loki Astari Dec 31 '10 at 18:15
538  
@Martin And hope that program is not printf("printf(1\\n2\\ .... –  belisarius Jan 1 '11 at 6:43
32  
open("1000.c",'w').write('printf("%s");' % ("\n".join([str(x) for x in xrange(1,1000)]))) –  Tyler Eaves Jan 3 '11 at 5:11
53  
I hope that the program you wrote to generate that line didn't contain loop! –  Jeeyoung Kim Jan 3 '11 at 6:19
20  
A Vim macro would do the job quickly. –  StackedCrooked Jan 4 '11 at 19:00
show 5 more comments
printf("%d\n", 2);
printf("%d\n", 3);

It doesn't print all the numbers, but it does "Print numbers from 1 to 1000." Ambiguous question for the win! :)

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77  
my favorite after 'printf("numbers from 1 to 1000")' - silly questions require silly answers. –  SEngstrom Jan 1 '11 at 6:57
2  
Edited; in no way, shape, or form did this code print "Print numbers from 1 to 1000." - ambiguous question for the win, inaccurate descriptions suck :) –  sehe Oct 26 '11 at 0:38
show 2 more comments

Trigger a fatal error! Here's the file, countup.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAX 1000
int boom;
int foo(n) {
    boom = 1 / (MAX-n+1);
    printf("%d\n", n);
    foo(n+1);
}
int main() {
    foo(1);
}

Compile, then execute on a shell prompt:

$ ./countup
1
2
3
...
996
997
998
999
1000
Floating point exception
$

This does indeed print the numbers from 1 to 1000, without any loops or conditionals!

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43  
you should call fflush(stdout); after each printf()... When a program crashes it's not guaranteed that the output buffer will be printed on screen. –  zakk Jan 3 '11 at 1:47
10  
@zakk: That's not strictly necessary - by default stdout is line buffered, so the \n will be enough to flush the output. –  psmears Jan 4 '11 at 12:31
24  
stdout is line buffered if it can be determined to be an interactive device , otherwise it's fully buffered. If the professor redirects stdout to a file for automated checking, you will fail :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 28 '11 at 3:50
3  
+1 This is definitely one of my favorite answers. I love the intentional error but honestly, the interviewer deserved it. –  quasiverse Mar 27 '11 at 7:16
show 1 more comment

Using system commands:

system("/usr/bin/seq 1000");
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6  
well this is a less portable solution.. –  Jokester Mar 21 '11 at 5:04
15  
High chance /usr/bin/seq uses a loop internally. :) –  user142019 Jun 6 '11 at 14:09
1  
Some bright dude decided to change my answer, so that's not my mistake. –  marcog Nov 26 '12 at 20:04
show 2 more comments

Untested, but should be vanilla standard C:

void yesprint(int i);
void noprint(int i);

typedef void(*fnPtr)(int);
fnPtr dispatch[] = { noprint, yesprint };

void yesprint(int i) {
    printf("%d\n", i);
    dispatch[i < 1000](i + 1);
}

void noprint(int i) { /* do nothing. */ }

int main() {
    yesprint(1);
}
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21  
@munificent : i <= 1000 is a condition. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 31 '10 at 8:02
29  
@Prasoon: It's a relation. –  ybungalobill Dec 31 '10 at 8:03
28  
requirement is "no conditionals" (if, switch, etc). not "no conditions" –  jon_darkstar Dec 31 '10 at 8:45
32  
< is not a condition. It's a relational operator. if / else is a conditional statement. ?: is a conditional operator. < is just an operator that returns a boolean value. It's probably a single machine instruction with no jumps or anything. –  Chris Lutz Dec 31 '10 at 9:38
12  
@Chris Lutz: On x86, it's 3 instructions: cmpl, setle, and movzbl. x86-64 is that plus a cltq. PowerPC is 2 instructions: cmpwi and crnot. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 2 '11 at 20:53
show 19 more comments

A bit boring compared to others here, but probably what they're looking for.

#include <stdio.h>

int f(int val) {
    --val && f(val);
    return printf( "%d\n", val+1);
}

void main(void) {
    f(1000);
}
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3  
@Jens Schauder: By taking advantage of lazy && evaluation in the first line of f(). –  Rafał Dowgird Jan 3 '11 at 12:17
10  
This isn't boring, it's simple. If you can do the same thing with a short function as you can with a huge mess of template magic, then you should do it with the function :) –  amertune Jan 3 '11 at 17:27
21  
The && is a conditional. A mathematical AND will evaluate both sides (like the Java & and the Ada "AND" does). && will evaluate the 2nd operator only if (here it is) the first is true. Or other example: In Ada it short-circuits operator is called "OR THEN" - using THEN to indicate the conditional aspect. Sorry, you could have just as well used the ? : operator. –  Martin Jan 3 '11 at 19:02
3  
+1 Never thought of using boolean operators in this way. –  quasiverse Mar 27 '11 at 7:20
show 3 more comments

The task never specified that the program must terminate after 1000.

void f(int n){
   printf("%d\n",n);
   f(n+1);
}

int main(){
   f(1);
}

(Can be shortened to this if you run ./a.out with no extra params)

void main(int n) {
   printf("%d\n", n);
   main(n+1);
}
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4  
I like this thinking. Its simple too –  Dmitriy Likhten Jan 3 '11 at 5:52
72  
As an afterthought: we can even evade apparent math. If we employ rand(), we shall print all of them numbers from 1 to 1000. Eventually =:P –  user332325 Feb 3 '11 at 9:23
5  
@pooh: Not necessarily, since rand() has a chance of repeating after certain sequence, and that sequence might be not fall in the solution set for this problem –  user814628 Jan 6 '12 at 5:36
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Easy as pie! :P

#include <iostream>

static int current = 1;

struct print
{
    print() { std::cout << current++ << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    print numbers [1000];
}
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show 2 more comments
#include <stdio.h>
#define Out(i)       printf("%d\n", i++);
#define REP(N)       N N N N N N N N N N
#define Out1000(i)   REP(REP(REP(Out(i))));
void main()
{
 int i = 1;
 Out1000(i);
}
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3  
Ummmm. Macros. It's whats for dinner. –  EvilTeach Mar 14 '11 at 19:26
add comment

We can launch 1000 threads, each printing one of the numbers. Install OpenMPI, compile using mpicxx -o 1000 1000.cpp and run using mpirun -np 1000 ./1000. You will probably need to increase your descriptor limit using limit or ulimit. Note that this will be rather slow, unless you have loads of cores!

#include <cstdio>
#include <mpi.h>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  MPI::Init(argc, argv);
  cout << MPI::COMM_WORLD.Get_rank() + 1 << endl;
  MPI::Finalize();
}

Of course, the numbers won't necessarily be printed in order, but the question doesn't require them to be ordered.

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1  
Implicit loop in the library? But +1 anyway for a new approach. –  Chris Lutz Jan 3 '11 at 6:18
11  
@Chris Don't most solutions have a hidden loop somewhere? –  marcog Jan 3 '11 at 10:20
show 2 more comments

With plain C:

#include<stdio.h>

/* prints number  i */ 
void print1(int i) {
    printf("%d\n",i);
}

/* prints 10 numbers starting from i */ 
void print10(int i) {
    print1(i);
    print1(i+1);
    print1(i+2);
    print1(i+3);
    print1(i+4);
    print1(i+5);
    print1(i+6);
    print1(i+7);
    print1(i+8);
    print1(i+9);
}

/* prints 100 numbers starting from i */ 
void print100(int i) {
    print10(i);
    print10(i+10);
    print10(i+20);
    print10(i+30);
    print10(i+40);
    print10(i+50);
    print10(i+60);
    print10(i+70);
    print10(i+80);
    print10(i+90);
}

/* prints 1000 numbers starting from i */ 
void print1000(int i) {
    print100(i);
    print100(i+100);
    print100(i+200);
    print100(i+300);
    print100(i+400);
    print100(i+500);
    print100(i+600);
    print100(i+700);
    print100(i+800);
    print100(i+900);
}


int main() {
        print1000(1);
        return 0;
}

Of course, you can implement the same idea for other bases (2: print2 print4 print8 ...) but the number 1000 here suggested base 10. You can also reduce a little the number of lines adding intermediate functions: print2() print10() print20() print100() print200() print1000() and other equivalent alternatives.

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Just use std::copy() with a special iterator.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

struct number_iterator
{
    typedef std::input_iterator_tag iterator_category;
    typedef int                     value_type;
    typedef std::size_t             difference_type;
    typedef int*                    pointer;
    typedef int&                    reference;

    number_iterator(int v): value(v)                {}
    bool operator != (number_iterator const& rhs)   { return value != rhs.value;}
    number_iterator operator++()                    { ++value; return *this;}
    int operator*()                                 { return value; }
    int value;
};



int main()
{
    std::copy(number_iterator(1), 
              number_iterator(1001), 
              std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}
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4  
I think std::copy treads a bit close to a loop. –  Chris Lutz Dec 31 '10 at 9:51
3  
@Chris Lutz: The implementation of copy is undefined. I may even use template code as above (you just don;t know). So you can't say it uses a loop because we don't know. –  Loki Astari Dec 31 '10 at 18:12
7  
Actually, my nit pick wouldn't be the implicit loop in std::copy so much as the implicit conditional in the operator !=(). Regardless, it's a clever take on processing a range, and clever approaches is what I look for in response to questions like this. –  Michael Burr Dec 31 '10 at 23:05
show 3 more comments
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
using namespace std;

int num() { static int i = 1; return i++; }
int main() { generate_n(ostream_iterator<int>(cout, "\n"), 1000, num); }
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5  
+1 for writing code someone might actually use. –  Evan Moran Mar 15 '11 at 1:07
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Function pointer (ab)use. No preprocessor magic to increase output. ANSI C.

#include <stdio.h>

int i=1;

void x10( void (*f)() ){
    f(); f(); f(); f(); f();
    f(); f(); f(); f(); f();
}

void I(){printf("%i ", i++);}
void D(){ x10( I ); }
void C(){ x10( D ); }
void M(){ x10( C ); }

int main(){
    M();
}
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4  
Very interesting solution! –  psihodelia Feb 3 '11 at 9:14
15  
+1 for roman numerals –  SLaks Feb 3 '11 at 14:14
3  
This is what I was thinking of. A previous person said that 5*5*5*8=1000. I thought that it was funny he was missing the obvious 10^3. Nice solution! –  Evan Moran Mar 15 '11 at 1:02
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Ugly C answer (unrolled for only one stack frame per power of 10):

#define f5(i) f(i);f(i+j);f(i+j*2);f(i+j*3);f(i+j*4)
void f10(void(*f)(int), int i, int j){f5(i);f5(i+j*5);}
void p1(int i){printf("%d,",i);}
#define px(x) void p##x##0(int i){f10(p##x, i, x);}
px(1); px(10); px(100);

void main()
{
  p1000(1);
}
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2  
+1 but it would totally be more elegant if you did it in powers of two IMHO. –  Chris Lutz Dec 31 '10 at 10:02
3  
all things alright, but why "void main()"? bad habits seldom go? :P –  Nawaz Jan 2 '11 at 18:20
30  
@Nawaz: Because this is secretly a Windows GUI app, so it doesn't matter. I only called it "main" because I was thinking about lobsters and have terrible spelling. –  Martin Jan 2 '11 at 22:56
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Stack overflow:

#include <stdio.h>

static void print_line(int i)
{   
 printf("%d\n", i); 
 print_line(i+1);
}   

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{   
 //get up near the stack limit
 char tmp[ 8388608 - 32 * 1000 - 196 * 32 ];
 print_line(1);
} 

This is for an 8MB stack. Each function invocation appears to take about 32 bytes (hence the 32 * 1000). But then when I ran it I only got to 804 (hence the 196 * 32; perhaps the C runtime has other parts in the stack that you have to deduct also).

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14  
+1 for unportable cleverness... –  Chris Lutz Jan 3 '11 at 8:10
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Fun with function pointers (none of that new-fangled TMP needed):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>


#define MSB(typ) ((sizeof(typ) * CHAR_BIT) - 1)

void done(int x, int y);
void display(int x, int y);

void (*funcs[])(int,int)  = {
    done,
    display
};

void done(int x, int y)
{
    exit(0);
}

void display(int x, int limit)
{
    printf( "%d\n", x);
    funcs[(((unsigned int)(x-limit)) >> MSB(int)) & 1](x+1, limit);
}


int main()
{
    display(1, 1000);
    return 0;
}

As a side note: I took the prohibition against conditionals to extend to logical and relational operators as well. If you allow logical negation, the recursive call can be simplified to:

funcs[!!(limit-1)](x+1, limit-1);
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6  
The double bang forces a non-zero expression to be exactly 1 (and leaves 0 alone), so !!(limit-1) will be 0 when limit == 1 and 1 when limit > 1. –  Michael Burr Dec 31 '10 at 9:04
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I feel this answer will be very simple and easy to understand.

int print1000(int num=1)
{
    printf("%d\n", num);

    // it will check first the num is less than 1000. 
    // If yes then call recursive function to print
    return num<1000 && print1000(++num); 
}

int main()
{
    print1000();
    return 0;        
}
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3  
Your answer uses conditional statements, which are forbidden according to the question. –  stevelove Jan 8 '11 at 5:36
4  
conditional statements are if else etc. I just used a logical operation!! Hpe it is clear! –  Pappu Jan 8 '11 at 6:45
1  
Excellent !!!!! –  Martin Babacaev Jan 22 '11 at 20:41
2  
Even in your comments you wrote "If yes then call recursive function to print". A conditional written in an unobvious way is still a conditional. The num default is also a conditional. –  Gerry Aug 13 '11 at 18:54
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I missed all the fun, all the good C++ answers have already been posted !

This is the weirdest thing I could come up with, I wouldn't bet it's legal C99 though :p

#include <stdio.h>

int i = 1;
int main(int argc, char *argv[printf("%d\n", i++)])
{
  return (i <= 1000) && main(argc, argv);
}

Another one, with a little cheating :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <boost/preprocessor.hpp>

#define ECHO_COUNT(z, n, unused) n+1
#define FORMAT_STRING(z, n, unused) "%d\n"

int main()
{
    printf(BOOST_PP_REPEAT(1000, FORMAT_STRING, ~), BOOST_PP_ENUM(LOOP_CNT, ECHO_COUNT, ~));
}

Last idea, same cheat :

#include <boost/preprocessor.hpp>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
#define ECHO_COUNT(z, n, unused) BOOST_PP_STRINGIZE(BOOST_PP_INC(n))"\n"
    std::cout << BOOST_PP_REPEAT(1000, ECHO_COUNT, ~) << std::endl;
}
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4  
It's perfectly legal C. @ybungalobill: You must be thinking of C++, where calling main() is specifically disallowed. –  Michael Foukarakis Dec 31 '10 at 10:44
6  
The logical operators && and || would likely fall under "conditionals" since they short-circuit (as would ?:). –  munificent Jan 1 '11 at 23:18
show 5 more comments

Easy as pie:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    printf(argv[0]);
}

method of execution:

printer.exe "1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12;13;14;15;16;17;18;19;20;21;22;23;24;25;26;27;28;29;30;31;32;33;34;35;36;37;38;39;40;41;42;43;44;45;46;47;48;49;50;51;52;53;54;55;56;57;58;59;60;61;62;63;64;65;66;67;68;69;70;71;72;73;74;75;76;77;78;79;80;81;82;83;84;85;86;87;88;89;90;91;92;93;94;95;96;97;98;99;100;101;102;103;104;105;106;107;108;109;110;111;112;113;114;115;116;117;118;119;120;121;122;123;124;125;126;127;128;129;130;131;132;133;134;135;136;137;138;139;140;141;142;143;144;145;146;147;148;149;150;151;152;153;154;155;156;157;158;159;160;161;162;163;164;165;166;167;168;169;170;171;172;173;174;175;176;177;178;179;180;181;182;183;184;185;186;187;188;189;190;191;192;193;194;195;196;197;198;199;200;201;202;203;204;205;206;207;208;209;210;211;212;213;214;215;216;217;218;219;220;221;222;223;224;225;226;227;228;229;230;231;232;233;234;235;236;237;238;239;240;241;242;243;244;245;246;247;248;249;250;251;252;253;254;255;256;257;258;259;260;261;262;263;264;265;266;267;268;269;270;271;272;273;274;275;276;277;278;279;280;281;282;283;284;285;286;287;288;289;290;291;292;293;294;295;296;297;298;299;300;301;302;303;304;305;306;307;308;309;310;311;312;313;314;315;316;317;318;319;320;321;322;323;324;325;326;327;328;329;330;331;332;333;334;335;336;337;338;339;340;341;342;343;344;345;346;347;348;349;350;351;352;353;354;355;356;357;358;359;360;361;362;363;364;365;366;367;368;369;370;371;372;373;374;375;376;377;378;379;380;381;382;383;384;385;386;387;388;389;390;391;392;393;394;395;396;397;398;399;400;401;402;403;404;405;406;407;408;409;410;411;412;413;414;415;416;417;418;419;420;421;422;423;424;425;426;427;428;429;430;431;432;433;434;435;436;437;438;439;440;441;442;443;444;445;446;447;448;449;450;451;452;453;454;455;456;457;458;459;460;461;462;463;464;465;466;467;468;469;470;471;472;473;474;475;476;477;478;479;480;481;482;483;484;485;486;487;488;489;490;491;492;493;494;495;496;497;498;499;500;501;502;503;504;505;506;507;508;509;510;511;512;513;514;515;516;517;518;519;520;521;522;523;524;525;526;527;528;529;530;531;532;533;534;535;536;537;538;539;540;541;542;543;544;545;546;547;548;549;550;551;552;553;554;555;556;557;558;559;560;561;562;563;564;565;566;567;568;569;570;571;572;573;574;575;576;577;578;579;580;581;582;583;584;585;586;587;588;589;590;591;592;593;594;595;596;597;598;599;600;601;602;603;604;605;606;607;608;609;610;611;612;613;614;615;616;617;618;619;620;621;622;623;624;625;626;627;628;629;630;631;632;633;634;635;636;637;638;639;640;641;642;643;644;645;646;647;648;649;650;651;652;653;654;655;656;657;658;659;660;661;662;663;664;665;666;667;668;669;670;671;672;673;674;675;676;677;678;679;680;681;682;683;684;685;686;687;688;689;690;691;692;693;694;695;696;697;698;699;700;701;702;703;704;705;706;707;708;709;710;711;712;713;714;715;716;717;718;719;720;721;722;723;724;725;726;727;728;729;730;731;732;733;734;735;736;737;738;739;740;741;742;743;744;745;746;747;748;749;750;751;752;753;754;755;756;757;758;759;760;761;762;763;764;765;766;767;768;769;770;771;772;773;774;775;776;777;778;779;780;781;782;783;784;785;786;787;788;789;790;791;792;793;794;795;796;797;798;799;800;801;802;803;804;805;806;807;808;809;810;811;812;813;814;815;816;817;818;819;820;821;822;823;824;825;826;827;828;829;830;831;832;833;834;835;836;837;838;839;840;841;842;843;844;845;846;847;848;849;850;851;852;853;854;855;856;857;858;859;860;861;862;863;864;865;866;867;868;869;870;871;872;873;874;875;876;877;878;879;880;881;882;883;884;885;886;887;888;889;890;891;892;893;894;895;896;897;898;899;900;901;902;903;904;905;906;907;908;909;910;911;912;913;914;915;916;917;918;919;920;921;922;923;924;925;926;927;928;929;930;931;932;933;934;935;936;937;938;939;940;941;942;943;944;945;946;947;948;949;950;951;952;953;954;955;956;957;958;959;960;961;962;963;964;965;966;967;968;969;970;971;972;973;974;975;976;977;978;979;980;981;982;983;984;985;986;987;988;989;990;991;992;993;994;995;996;997;998;999;1000"

The specification does not say that the sequence must be generated inside the code :)

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#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Printer
{
public:
 Printer() { cout << ++i_ << "\n"; }
private:
 static unsigned i_;
};

unsigned Printer::i_ = 0;

int main()
{
 Printer p[1000];
}
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9  
Essentially the same as one already posted. –  Chris Lutz Dec 31 '10 at 9:44
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#include <stdio.h>

void nothing(int);
void next(int);
void (*dispatch[2])(int) = {next, nothing};

void nothing(int x) { }
void next(int x)
{
    printf("%i\n", x);
    dispatch[x/1000](x+1);
}

int main()
{
    next(1);
    return 0;
}
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add comment

More preprocessor abuse:

#include <stdio.h>

#define A1(x,y) #x #y "0\n" #x #y "1\n" #x #y "2\n" #x #y "3\n" #x #y "4\n" #x #y "5\n" #x #y "6\n" #x #y "7\n" #x #y "8\n" #x #y "9\n"
#define A2(x) A1(x,1) A1(x,2) A1(x,3) A1(x,4) A1(x,5) A1(x,6) A1(x,7) A1(x,8) A1(x,9)
#define A3(x) A1(x,0) A2(x)
#define A4 A3(1) A3(2) A3(3) A3(4) A3(5) A3(6) A3(7) A3(8) A3(9)
#define A5 "1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6\n7\n8\n9\n" A2() A4 "1000\n"

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    printf(A5);
    return 0;
}

I feel so dirty; I think I'll go shower now.

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2  
Can you call A2() without an argument like that? –  Chris Lutz Jan 3 '11 at 10:30
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If POSIX solutions are accepted:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <pthread.h>

static void die(int sig) {
    exit(0);
}

static void wakeup(int sig) {
    static int counter = 1;
    struct itimerval timer;
    float i = 1000 / (1000 - counter);

    printf("%d\n", counter++);

    timer.it_interval.tv_sec = 0;
    timer.it_interval.tv_usec = 0;
    timer.it_value.tv_sec = 0;
    timer.it_value.tv_usec = i; /* Avoid code elimination */
    setitimer(ITIMER_REAL, &timer, 0);
}

int main() {
    pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;
    signal(SIGFPE, die);
    signal(SIGALRM, wakeup);
    wakeup(0);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex); /* Deadlock, YAY! */
    return 0;
}
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1  
+1 for the deadlock. –  Christian Rau Aug 8 '11 at 12:30
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Since there is no restriction on bugs..

int i=1; int main() { int j=i/(i-1001); printf("%d\n", i++); main(); }

Or even better(?),

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

int i=1;
int foo() { int j=i/(i-1001); printf("%d\n", i++); foo(); }

int main()
{
        signal(SIGFPE, exit);
        foo();
}
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2  
You should avoid compiler optimisations then, to keep the otherwise unused j. –  bandi Jan 3 '11 at 12:08
2  
He only need to add volatile to the declaration of j –  tristopia Jan 24 '11 at 13:15
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