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Task: Print numbers from 1 to 1000 without using any loop or conditional statements. Don't just write the printf() or cout statement 1000 times.

How would you do that using C or C++?

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locked by Will Jun 26 '13 at 20:01

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137  
The obvious answer is to use 500 calls to printf and print two numbers each time, no? –  James McNellis Dec 31 '10 at 6:59
283  
The real answer is "don't work there". –  Etienne de Martel Dec 31 '10 at 7:00
77  
Why do interview questions always want you to write code that you shouldn't realistically write in application? –  birryree Dec 31 '10 at 7:01
433  
printf("numbers from 1 to 1000"); –  jondavidjohn Dec 31 '10 at 7:07
127  
The interview your chance to shine. Tell them "Without loops or conditionals? Child's play. I can do it without a computer!" Then pull out pen and notepad. They may give you a confused look, but just explain that if you can't count on built in language constructs, you really can't assume anything. –  JohnFx Dec 31 '10 at 18:40
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106 Answers

        #include <stdio.h>
        #include <stdlib.h>
        #include <string.h>

        typedef void(*word)(int);

        word words[1024];

        void print(int i) {
                printf("%d\n", i);
                words[i+1](i+1);
        }

        void bye(int i) {
                exit(0);
        }

        int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
                words[0] = print;
                words[1] = print;
                memcpy(&words[2], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 2); // 0-3
                memcpy(&words[4], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 4); // 0-7
                memcpy(&words[8], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 8); // 0-15
                memcpy(&words[16], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 16); // 0-31
                memcpy(&words[32], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 32); // 0-63
                memcpy(&words[64], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 64); // 0-127
                memcpy(&words[128], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 128); // 0-255
                memcpy(&words[256], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 256); // 0-511
                memcpy(&words[512], &words[0], sizeof(word) * 512); // 0-1023
                words[1001] = bye;
                words[1](1);
        }
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Amazing how easy it becomes if you drop the "has to be in C or C++" requirement:

Unix shell:

echo {1..1000} | tr ' ' '\n'

or

yes | nl | awk '{print $1}' | head -1000

If you're running on a Unix variant that doesn't have the yes command, use some other process that generates at least 1000 lines:

find / 2> /dev/null | nl | awk '{print $1}' | head -1000

or

cat /dev/zero | uuencode - | nl | awk '{print $1}' | head -1000

or

head -1000 /etc/termcap | nl -s: | cut -d: -f1
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2  
Well, we just use system(), and voila! :) –  user332325 Feb 3 '11 at 9:17
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Put the 1 to 1000 in a file "file"

int main()
{
    system("cat file");
    return 0;
 }
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I'm assuming, due to the nature of this question that extensions are not excluded?

Also, I'm surprised that so far no one used goto.

int main () {
    int i = 0;
    void * addr[1001] = { [0 ... 999] = &&again};
    addr[1000] = &&end;
again:
    printf("%d\n", i + 1);
    goto *addr[++i];
end:
    return 0;
}

Ok, so technically it is a loop - but it's no more a loop than all the recursive examples so far ;)

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I'm wondering if the interviewer garbled a different question: Calculate the sum of the numbers from 1 to 1000 (or from any n through m) without using a loop. It also teaches a good lesson about analyzing problems. Printing the #s from 1 through 1000s in C will always rely on tricks that you may not use in a production program (tail recursion in Main, side effects of how truthiness is calculated, or preproc and template tricks.)

That would be a good spot-check to see if you've had any sort of mathematical training, because that old story about Gauss and his solution would probably be well known to anyone with any sort of math training.

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Well, what do you think about

int main(void) {
    printf(" 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8");
    return 0;
}

I bet that 1000 was in binary and he was obviously checking the guy's CQ ( compSci Quotient)

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This is standard C:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    printf("%d ", argc);
    (void) (argc <= 1000 && main(argc+1, 0));

    return 0;
}

If you call it without arguments, it will print the numbers from 1 to 1000. Notice that the && operator is not a "conditional statement" even though it serves the same purpose.

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c++ exploiting RAII

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

static int i = 1;
struct a
{
    a(){cout<<i++<<endl;}
    ~a(){cout<<i++<<endl;}
}obj[500];

int main(){return 0;}

C exploiting macros

#include <stdio.h>

#define c1000(x) c5(c5(c5(c4(c2(x))))) 
#define c5(x) c4(x) c1(x) //or x x x x x
#define c4(x) c2(c2(x))   //or x x x x
#define c2(x) c1(x) c1(x) //or x x
#define c1(x) x

int main(int i){c1000(printf("%d\n",i++);)return 0;}

Edit: One more, this one is simple

#include <stdio.h>
#define p10(x) x x x x x x x x x x
int main(int i){p10(p10(p10(printf("%d\n",i++);)))return 0;} 

C exploiting recrusion

edit: this c code contains <= and ?: operators

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int i){return (i<=1000)?main(printf("%d\n",i++)*0 + i):0;}
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#include<iostream>
#include<stdexcept>

using namespace std;

int main(int arg)

{
    try

    {

        printf("%d\n",arg);
        int j=1/(arg-1000);
        main(arg+1);
    }

    catch(...)
    {
        exit(1);
    }
}
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#include <stdio.h>

int show(int i) {
   printf("%d\n",i);
   return( (i>=1000) || show(i+1));
}


int main(int argc,char **argv) {
   return show(1);
}

The || operator short-circuits the recursive call to show when i is >= 1000.

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2  
i>=1000 is a conditional. Requirements not met. –  Mark H Jan 3 '11 at 5:42
3  
@Sparkie >= is a relational operator, it is not a condition, that debate has happened here already, and other answers have used this same approach. –  Chris Lutz Jan 3 '11 at 6:32
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#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

void foo( int n )
{
 printf("%d\n", n);
 assert( n > 0 );
 foo(--n); 
}

int main()
{
 foo( 1000 );
 getchar();
}
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#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
printf("numbers from 1 to 1000\n");
}
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If your C compiler supports blocks then you can write the following:

#include <stdio.h>

void ten(void (^b)(void)) { b();b();b();b();b();b();b();b();b();b(); }

int main() {
    __block int i = 0;
    ten(^{
        ten(^{
            ten(^{
                printf("%d\n", ++i);
            });
        });
    });
    return 0;
}
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Assuming the program is run in the usual way (./a.out) so that it has one argument, and ignoring the compiler type warnings then:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void main(int i) {
    static void (*cont[2])(int) = { main, exit };
    printf("%d\n", i);
    cont[i/1000](i+1);
}
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Here's a version that uses setjmp/longjmp, because someone had to do it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <setjmp.h>

void print(int i) {
    printf("%d\n", i);
}
typedef void (*func_t)(int);

int main() {
    jmp_buf buf;
    func_t f[] = {print, exit};
    int i = setjmp(buf)+1;
    f[i/1001](i);
    longjmp(buf, i);
    return 0;
}
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1  
Sadly, setjmp is only guaranteed to work within a conditional construct; so it's precluded by the rules. +1 for stickin' it to the rules! –  luser droog Jun 23 '11 at 4:18
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Despite all the brilliant code seen here, I think that the only real answer is that it can't be done.

Why? Simple. Every single answer is, in fact, looping. Looping hidden as recursion is still looping. One look at the assembly code reveals this fact. Even reading and printing a text file with the numbers involves looping. Again, look at the machine code. Typing 1000 printf statements also means looping because printf itself has loops within it.

Can't be done.

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1  
Look at my answer :) stackoverflow.com/questions/4568645/… –  Rodrigo Jun 23 '11 at 1:54
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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<int N>
void func()
{
        func<N-1>();
        cout << N << "\t";
}

template<>
void func<1>()
{
        cout << 1 << "\t";
}

int main()
{
        func<1000>();
        cout << endl;
        return 0;
}
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I've read through all of these answers, and mine's different from all the others. It is standard C and uses integer division to select function pointers from an array. Moreover it compiles and executes correctly with no warnings and even passes 'splint' with no warnings.

I was, of course inspired by many of the other answers here. Even so, mine's better.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int x(/*@unused@*/ const char * format, ...) { exit(0); }

static void p(int v, int e) {
    static int (*a[])(const char *, ...) = { printf, x };
    (void)a[v/(e+1)]("%d\n", v);
    p(v+1, e);
}

int main(void) {
    p(1, 1000);
    return 0;
}
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#include "stdafx.h"
static n=1;
class number {
public:
    number () {
        std::cout << n++ << std::endl;
    }
};
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    number X[1000];
    return 0;
}
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    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        print(1000);
        System.Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static bool print(int val)
    {
        try
        {
            print( ((val/val)*val) - 1);
            System.Console.WriteLine(val.ToString());
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
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1  
Not actually C++ or C. –  jon-hanson Mar 14 '11 at 21:48
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#include <boost/mpl/range_c.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/for_each.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  boost::mpl::for_each<boost::mpl::range_c<unsigned, 1, 1001> >(std::cout << boost::lambda::_1 << '\n');
  return(0);
}
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It is hard to see through all the solutions that have already been proposed, so maybe this is a duplicate.

I wanted to have something relatively simple just with pure C and not C++. It uses recursion, but contrary to other solutions that I have seen it only does recursion of logarithmic depth. The use of conditionals is avoided by a table lookup.

typedef void (*func)(unsigned, unsigned);
void printLeaf(unsigned, unsigned);
void printRecurse(unsigned, unsigned);


func call[2] = { printRecurse, printLeaf };

/* All array members that are not initialized 
   explicitly are implicitly initialized to 0 
   according to the standard. */
unsigned strat[1000] = { 0, 1 };


void printLeaf(unsigned start, unsigned len) {
  printf("%u\n", start);
}

void printRecurse(unsigned start, unsigned len) {
  unsigned half0 = len / 2;
  unsigned half1 = len - half0;
  call[strat[half0]](start, half0);
  call[strat[half1]](start + half0, half1);
}

int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {
  printRecurse(0, 1000);
}

This could even be done dynamically by using just a pointer. Relevant changes:

unsigned* strat = 0;

int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {
  strat = calloc(N, sizeof(*strat));
  strat[1] = 1;
  printRecurse(0, N);
}
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stand c++ concept, pass on gcc, vc

[root@localhost ~]# cat 1.cpp
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int i = 1;
void print(int arg0)
{
    printf("%d ",i);
    *(&arg0 - 1) = (int)print;
    *(&arg0 - i/1000) = (int)exit;
    i++;
}
int main(void) {
    int a[1000];
    print(0);
    return 0;
}

Running it:

[root@localhost ~]# g++ 1.cpp -o 1
[root@localhost ~]# ./1

1 2 ... 1000
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If you don't mind leading zeros, then lets skip printf

#include <stdlib.h>
void l();
void n();
void (*c[3])() = {l, n, exit};
char *a;
void (*x)();
char b[] = "0000";
void run() { x(); run(); }
#define C(d,s,i,j,f) void d() { s;x = c[i]; a = j;f; }
C(l, puts(b), 1+(a<b), b+3,)
C(n, int v = *a - '0' + 1; *a = v%10 + '0', v/10, a-1,)
C(main,,1,b+3, run())
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#include <stdio.h>

static void (*f[2])(int);
static void p(int i)
{ 
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

static void e(int i)
{
    exit(0);
}

static void r(int i)
{ 
    f[(i-1)/1000](i);
    r(i+1);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    f[0] = p;
    f[1] = e;
    r(1);
}
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Here's a POSIX variant using signals:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>

void counter(int done)
{
        static int i;

        done = ++i / 1000;

        printf("%d\n", i);

        signal(SIGINT, (void (*)(int))(done * (int)SIG_DFL + (1-done) * (int)&counter));
        raise(SIGINT);
}

int main()
{
        signal(SIGINT, &counter);
        raise(SIGINT);

        return 0;
}

The interesting part is counter()'s call to signal(). Here, a new signal handler is installed: SIG_DFL if "done" is true, &counter otherwise.

To make this solution even more ridiculous, I used the signal handler's required int parameter to hold the result of a temporary computation. As a side-effect, the annoying "unused variable" warning disappears when compiling with gcc -W -Wall.

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Here are my 2 solutions. First is C# and the second in C:

C#:

const int limit = 1000;

Action<int>[] actions = new Action<int>[2];
actions[0] = (n) => { Console.WriteLine(n); };
actions[1] = (n) => { Console.WriteLine(n);  actions[Math.Sign(limit - n-1)](n + 1); };

actions[1](0);

C:

#define sign(x) (( x >> 31 ) | ( (unsigned int)( -x ) >> 31 ))

void (*actions[3])(int);

void Action0(int n)
{
    printf("%d", n);
}

void Action1(int n)
{
    int index;
    printf("%d\n", n);
    index = sign(998-n)+1;
    actions[index](++n);
}

void main()
{
    actions[0] = &Action0;
    actions[1] = 0; //Not used
    actions[2] = &Action1;

    actions[2](0);
}
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As it is answer :)

printf("numbers from 1 to 1000 without using any loop or conditional statements. Don't just write the printf() or cout statement 1000 times.");

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1  
Funny, but not reached the +1 level. –  Dr Beco Apr 3 '11 at 18:48
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a dirty code :s

used xor and array of function pointers.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef void (*fn)(int);
int lst[1001];

void print (int n)
{
  printf ("%d ", n+1);
  go (n+1);
}

void go (int n)
{
  ((fn)(((long)print)^((long)lst[n])))(n);
}

int main ()
{
  lst[1000] = ((long)print)^((long)exit);
  go (0);
}
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