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Task: Print numbers from 1 to 1000 without using any loop or conditional statements. Don't just write the printf() or cout statement 1000 times.

How would you do that using C or C++?

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137  
The obvious answer is to use 500 calls to printf and print two numbers each time, no? –  James McNellis Dec 31 '10 at 6:59
283  
The real answer is "don't work there". –  Etienne de Martel Dec 31 '10 at 7:00
77  
Why do interview questions always want you to write code that you shouldn't realistically write in application? –  birryree Dec 31 '10 at 7:01
433  
printf("numbers from 1 to 1000"); –  jondavidjohn Dec 31 '10 at 7:07
127  
The interview your chance to shine. Tell them "Without loops or conditionals? Child's play. I can do it without a computer!" Then pull out pen and notepad. They may give you a confused look, but just explain that if you can't count on built in language constructs, you really can't assume anything. –  JohnFx Dec 31 '10 at 18:40

106 Answers 106

#include <stdio.h>
void main(int i){printf("%d\n",i)&&i++<1000&&(*((int*)&i-1)-=5);} 

another one:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int i){return i<=1000&&printf("%d\n",i)&&main(++i);}
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Perhaps this is too obvious and easy to follow, but this is standard C++, does not dump stack and runs in O(n) time using O(n) memory.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main (int argc, char** args) {
  vector<int> foo = vector<int>(1000);
  int terminator = 0;
 p:
  cout << terminator << endl; 
  try {
    foo.at(terminator++);
  } catch(...) {
    return 0;
  }
  goto p;
}
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1  
p: ... goto p; is a looping construct. –  OrangeDog Feb 1 '11 at 19:41

Obviously requires Windows/Visual Studio... But it works.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <Windows.h>

void print(int x)
{
    int y;

    printf("%d\n", x);
    __try
    {
        y = 1 / (x - 1000);
        print(x + 1);
    }
    __except(EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER)
    {
        return;
    }
}

void main()
{
    print(1);
}
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Simple C version, terminates at 1000:

int print_stuff(int count) {
   printf("%d\n", count);
   return (count ^ 1000) && print_stuff(count+1);
 }

 int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
   print_stuff(1);
   return 0;
 }
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#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
#define N 10    //10 or 1000, doesn't matter

class A{
public:
    A(){
        //cout << "A(): " << m_ << endl;    //uncomment to show the difference between gcc and Microsoft C++ compiler
    }
    A(const A&){
        ++m_;
        cout << m_ << endl;     
    }
private:
    static int m_;  //global counter
};

int A::m_(0);  //initialization

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //Creates a vector with N elements. Printing is from the copy constructor, 
    //which is called exactly N times.
    vector<A> v(N);  
    return 0;   
}

Implementation note:
With gcc: One "master" element is created by the default constructor. Then the element is copied N times by the copy constructor.
With Microsoft C++ compiler: all the elements are created by default constructor and then copied by the copy constructor.

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If you're going to use compile-time recursion, then you probably also want to use divide & conquer to avoid hitting template depth limits:

#include <iostream>

template<int L, int U>
struct range
{
    enum {H = (L + U) / 2};
    static inline void f ()
    {
        range<L, H>::f ();
        range<H+1, U>::f ();
    }
};

template<int L>
struct range<L, L>
{
    static inline void f ()
    {
        std::cout << L << '\n';
    }
};

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    range<1, 1000>::f ();
    return 0;
}
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#include <stdio.h>
int main() { printf("numbers from 1 to 1000"); return 0; }

It's like that other riddle about english words that end in "gry", right?.

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Javascript thrown in for fun. Includes an automatic stop at 1000:

var max = 1000;
var b = ["break"];
function increment(i) {
    var j = Math.abs(i - max);
    console.log(j);           
    b[(i/i) - 1].toString();
    i--;
    increment(i);    
}
increment(max);
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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

void (*f[2])(int v);

void p(int v) 
{ 
  printf("%d\n", v++); 
  f[(int)(floor(pow(v, v - 1000)))](v); 
}

void e(int v) 
{
  printf("%d\n", v);
}

int main(void)
{
  f[0] = p;
  f[1] = e;
  p(1);
}
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Note:

  • please look forward to get results.
  • that this program often bug.

Then

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

#ifdef _WIN32
#include <windows.h>
#define sleep(x) Sleep(x*1000)
#endif

int main() {
  time_t c = time(NULL);
retry:
  sleep(1);
  std::cout << time(NULL)-c << std::endl;
goto retry;
}
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I am not going to write the code but just the idea. How about to make a thread that print a number per second, and then another thread kill the first thread after 1000 seconds?

note: the first thread generate numbers by recursion.

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I don't suppose this is a "trick question" . . . "?:" isn't an conditional, it is an operator.

So use recursion and the ?: operator to detect the when to stop?

int recurse(i)
{
   printf("%d\n", i);
   int unused = i-1000?recurse(i+1):0;

}

recurse(1);

Or along a similar perverted line of thinking . . . the second clause in an "&" condition is only executed if the first value is true. So recurse something like this:

i-1000 & recurse(i+1);

Perhaps the interviewer considers that an expression instead of a conditional.

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You can use System() to print 1 to 1000 (by using DOS Command)

 include <process.h>
 void main()
 {
     system("cmd.exe /c for /l %x in (1, 1, 1000) do echo %x" );
 }

Run .exe(executable) file of your program which displays 1 to 1000

NOTE: Tested in WINDOWS

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i think these code works perfectly right and its easy to understand you can print any like 1 to 100 or 1 to the final range. just put it in i and transfer it to call function.

int main()
{
    int i=1;
    call(i,i);
}

void call(int i,int j)
{
    printf("%d",i);
    sleep(1); // to see the numbers for delay
    j /= (j-1000);

    j = ++i;

    call(i,j);
}

so when j equals 1000 it gets divide by zero and it directly exits the program thats my idea to print the numbers

or much simpler code..

int main()
{
    static int i = 1;
    static int j = 1;
    printf("%d", i);
    sleep(1);
    j = ++i;
    j /= (j-1000);
    main();
}
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1  
i just gave a hint boss its an interview its a logical thing you need to show your not going apply it in your real code –  jack Jun 27 '11 at 13:17

Recursion?

#include<stdio.h>
#define MAX 1000

int i = 0;
void foo(void) {
    if(i <= 1000) {
         printf("%d", i);
         i++;
    }
}
int main (void) {
    foo();
}
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7  
This has already been done over and over. And this isn't even correct. –  GManNickG Feb 2 '11 at 2:29
3  
Were you drunk? –  lesderid Jun 29 '12 at 14:51

you can use recursion .

like this:

void Print(int n)
{
  cout<<n<<" ";   
  if(n>1000)
     return
  else
     return Print(n+1)
}    

int main ()
{
  Print(1);
}
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27  
You seem to have forgotten the "or conditional statements" part. –  munificent Dec 31 '10 at 7:59

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