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I need to write a bash script that, among other things, should pass all its arguments intact to another program.

Minimal example:

$ cat >proxy.sh 
#!/bin/bash

./script.sh $@
^D

$ chmod +x proxy.sh 

$ cat >script.sh 
#!/bin/bash

echo one $1
echo two $2
echo three $3 
^D

$ chmod +x script.sh 

This naïve approach does not work for arguments with spaces:

$ ./proxy.sh "a b" c
one a
two b
three c

Expected:

$ ./proxy.sh "a b" c
one a b
two c
three

What should I write in proxy.sh for this to happen?

Note that I can't use aliases, proxy.sh must be a script — it does some stuff before invoking script.sh.

share|improve this question
1  
"...should all its arguments intact to another program." -- is that a typo? What did you mean to say? –  Mehrdad Dec 31 '10 at 9:17
    
"...should pass all its arguments..." Fixed, sorry. –  Alexander Gladysh Dec 31 '10 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Quote $@, making it "$@":

$ cat >proxy.sh 
#!/bin/bash

./script.sh "$@"
^D

Then it retains the original quotes:

one a b
two c
three
share|improve this answer
    
It works, thanks. I did not expect that, I thought that this would glue all arguments to one... Need to read up on Bash syntax, I guess. –  Alexander Gladysh Dec 31 '10 at 9:14
5  
This is correct. $@ must always be quoted, or else it doesn't do what you want (it does the same as $* instead, which is usually a bug). –  psmears Dec 31 '10 at 9:14
3  
You also have to enclose all other variables in "double quotes" if you want to keep the spaces in them. Except in a few rare cases, so always write "$var" instead of $var. –  Roland Illig Dec 31 '10 at 9:39

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