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Let us have the new user type Tlist represented by the set of template objects:

template <class T>
struct TList
{
    typedef std::set <Object <T>, sortByVal >   TObjects;     
};

Must be the comparator sortByVal also template class or it is sufficient a template method of the non-template class?

class sortByVal 
{
    public:
        template <class T>
        bool operator() ( const Object  <T> &o1, const Object  <T> &o2 ) const
        {
            return o1.getVal() < o2.getVal();
        }
};

or

template <class T>
class sortByVal 
{
    public:
        bool operator() ( const Object  <T> &o1, const Object  <T> &o2 ) const
        {
            return o1.getVal() < o2.getVal();
        }
};
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It's called a class template, because it's a template from which classes are created, not the other way round. –  sbi Dec 31 '10 at 10:46

3 Answers 3

You can do it one way or the other, it's a matter of taste.

However, in the second case, you should use it like this:

typedef std::set <Object <T>, sortByVal<T> >   TObjects;
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I would move comparator to TList class. And since it has no state, it's simpler to make it a static function:

template<typename T>
struct TList
{
    static bool Compare(const TObject<T> &o1,const TObject<T> &o2);
...
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Typically, you would use the templated member function, because what's the point of writing <T> every time you want to refer to it?

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