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I have a pretty good understanding of Javascript, except that I can't figure out a nice way to set the "this" variable. Consider:

var myFunction = function(){
    alert(this.foo_variable);
}

var someObj = document.body; //using body as example object
someObj.foo_variable = "hi"; //set foo_variable so it alerts

var old_fn = someObj.fn;   //store old value
someObj.fn = myFunction;   //bind to someObj so "this" keyword works
someObj.fn();              
someObj.fn = old_fn;       //restore old value

Is there a way to do this without the last 4 lines? It's rather annoying... I've tried binding an anonymous function, which I thought was beautiful and clever, but to no avail:

var myFunction = function(){
    alert(this.foo_variable);
}

var someObj = document.body;        //using body as example object
someObj.foo_variable = "hi";        //set foo_variable so it alerts
someObj.(function(){ fn(); })();    //fail.

Obviously, passing the variable into myFunction is an option... but that's not the point of this question.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 145 down vote accepted

There are two methods defined for all functions in javascript, call() and apply(). The function syntax looks like:

call( /* object */, /* arguments... */ );
apply(/* object */, /* arguments[] */);

What these functions do is call the function they were invoked on, assigning the value of the object parameter to this.


var myFunction = function(){
    alert(this.foo_variable);
}
myFunction.call( document.body ); 

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3  
coooooool :) Why oh why didn't I know that? –  naugtur Feb 8 '10 at 18:02
    
Also, if you're using jQuery, you can use $.proxy(function, element) so that whenever that function is called, it will be in the context of element. api.jquery.com/jquery.proxy –  Trevin Avery Oct 30 '14 at 20:31

I think you're looking for call:

myFunction.call(obj, arg1, arg2, ...);

This calls myFunction with this set to obj.

There is also the slightly different method apply, which takes the function parameters as an array:

myFunction.apply(obj, [arg1, arg2, ...]);
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1  
See section 15.3.4.3, 15.3.4.4 and 10.1.8 in ECMAScript Language Specification: ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-262.pdf –  some Jan 19 '09 at 9:26

If you want to 'store' the this value to a function so that you can call it seamlessly later (e.g. when you don't have access to that value anymore), you can bind it (not available in all browsers though):

var bound = func.bind(someThisValue);

// ... later on, where someThisValue is not available anymore

bound(); // will call with someThisValue as 'this'
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2  
FYI bind is apparently available in IE9+, FF4+, Safari 5.1.4+ and Chrome 7+ (source). You can also call bind directly on an anonymous function: var myFunction = function(){ /* this = something */ }.bind(something); –  Adam Mar 28 '14 at 0:51

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