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I'm having trouble mapping the following in NHibernate:

I have two tables (these are legacy and can't be altered):

       tblParts
       =======
 + --- ID            int identity(1,1)  [----------+
 |     Name          varchar(50)                   |
 |     PartTypeID    int                           |
1:*     Quantity      int                          |
 |                                                 |
 |     tblPartAssemblyItems                       *:1
 |     ====================                        |
 +-]   PartID              int (PK)                |
       AssemblyItemPartID  int (PK) ---------------+
       Status              int
       Coding              varchar(50)

tblParts.PartTypeID tells us the type of part. There are several possible values. There is a special condition where:

  • PartTypeID = 0 - it tells us that this part is made up of 0 or more sub parts listed in tblPartAssemblyItems.
  • PartTypeID = 1 - this is a complete standalone part
  • PartTypeID = 2 - this part is used to make up other parts

PartID is a foreignkey value tblParts.ID. AssemblyItemPartID references a part record in tblParts by tblParts.ID.

A sub-part will never ever be made up of other subparts which keeps the nesting to one level deep.

PartID + AssemblyItemPartID form a composite primary key.

In my code I have:

public class Part
{
  public virtual int ID { get; set; }
  public virtual string Name { get; set; }
  public virtual int PartTypeID { get; set; }
  public virtual int Quantity { get; set; }
  public virtual IList<PartAssemblyItem>
}

public class PartAssemblyItem
{
  public virtual int PartID { get; set; }
  public virtual int AssemblyItemPartID { get; set; }
  public virtual int Status { get; set; }
  public virtual string Coding { get; set; }
  public virtual string Name { get; set; }

  public override bool Equals(object obj) { .. snipped .. }
  public override int GetHashCode() { .. snipped .. }
}

I've got my basic mapping working just fine:

<class name="Part" table="tblParts">
  <id name="ID">
    <column name="ID" sql-type="int" not-null="true"/>
    <generator class="identity" />
  </id>
  <property name="Name"/>
  <property name="PartTypeID"/>
  <bag name="PartAssemblyItems">
    <key column="PartID"/>
    <one-to-many class="PartAssemblyItem"/>
  </bag>
</class>

<class name="PartAssemblyItem" table="tblPartAssemblyItems">
  <composite-id>
    <key-property name="PartID" column="PartID"/>
    <key-property name="AssemblyItemPartID" column="AssemblyItemPartID"/>
  </composite-id>
  <property name="Status" />
  <property name="Coding" />
  <property name="Name" />   <-- How do I map this?
</class>

However I don't know how to join/look back to tblParts to get the Name of the PartAssemblyItem.

If this was T-SQL I'd do something like this to select all parts and their part makeup:

SELECT p.ID, p.Name, p.PartTypeID, i.AssemblyItemPartID, 
       i.Status, i.Coding, 
       p2.Name AS AssemblyItemPartName
FROM tblParts p
LEFT JOIN tblPartAssemblyItems i ON p.ID = i.PartID
-- This join here to get the subassembly name
LEFT JOIN tblParts p2 ON i.AssemblyItemPartID = p2.ID
WHERE p.PartTypeID <> 2 
ORDER BY p.ID

How do I do this in an "NHibernate" way, can I use HQL to join back to Part/tblParts?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

tblPartAssemblyItems doesn't have a Name column, so don't map it. If you really want it in your class, then define a custom getter which returns the name of the joined entity.

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Thanks for the response. I've clarified what I need to do. –  Kev Dec 31 '10 at 15:28
    
I think I get it. It's confusing you're asking about mapping the name property, it's not what you need. The problem seems to be that tblPartAssemblyItems.PartID is a part of a primary key and also a foreign key, right? Well, I don't think it's possible. Anyway, mapping a foreign key alone means using a <many-to-one> mapping element, and in your code, you'd have a Part reference instead of a PartID integer. Check if you can use that inside a <composite-id>. –  fejesjoco Dec 31 '10 at 15:42
    
Ok...your comment about having a Part reference sunk in...I think I have a working solution. Thanks. ps: You should edit your comment into your answer. –  Kev Dec 31 '10 at 18:29

With the help fejesjoco's comment about having a Part reference in PartAssemblyItem I think I've solved this:

public class PartAssemblyItem
{
  public virtual int PartID { get; set; }
  public virtual int AssemblyItemPartID { get; set; }
  public virtual int Status { get; set; }
  public virtual string Coding { get; set; }
  // public virtual string Name { get; set; } <--- DELETED THIS
  // Then added this:
  public virtual Part Part { get; set; }

  public override bool Equals(object obj) { .. snipped .. }
  public override int GetHashCode() { .. snipped .. }
}

The configured my PartAssemblyItem.hbm.xml mapping as:

<class name="PartAssemblyItem" table="tblPartAssemblyItems">
  <composite-id>
    <key-property name="PartID" column="PartID"/>
    <key-property name="AssemblyItemPartID" column="AssemblyItemPartID"/>
  </composite-id>
  <property name="Status" />
  <property name="Coding" />

  <!-- The magic happens here -->
  <many-to-one name="Part" class="Part" column="AssemblyItemPartID" />
</class>

So now I can get a list of parts and walk their part makeup:

using(ISession session = partsDB.OpenSession())
{
  using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
  {
    IList<Part> parts = 
      session
      .CreateQuery("select p from Part as p where p.PartTypeID <> 2")
      .List<Part>();

    foreach (Part part in parts)
    {
      Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", part.ID, part.Name);

      foreach (PartAssemblyItem subPart in part.PartAssemblyItems)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("--> {0} - {1}", subPart.Part.ID, subPart.Part.Name);
      }
    }
  }
}

Also this article by Ayende completed the circle:

NHibernate Mapping - one-to-one

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