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May I have any acces to local variable in different function? If may, how?

void replaceNumberAndPrint(int array[3]) {
    printf("%i\n", array[1]);
    printf("%i\n", array[1]);
}

int * getArray() {
    int myArray[3] = {4, 65, 23};
    return myArray;
}

int main() {
    replaceNumberAndPrint(getArray());
}

The output of the piece of code above:

65
4202656

What am i doing wrong? What the "4202656" means??

Do I have to copy the whole array in the replaceNumberAndPrint() function to be able to access to it more than first times?

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1  
Hard to know the best suggestion for your intention, here. But you might like to read up on shared pointers (shared_ptr and friends). They provide some of the nice properties of garbage collected languages by doing reference counting. But different, so use caution. –  HostileFork Dec 31 '10 at 13:59
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8 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

myArray is a local variable and as thus the pointer is only valid until the end of its scope (which is in this case the containing function getArray) is left. If you access it later you get undefined behavior.

In practice what happens is that the call to printf overwrites the part of the stack used by myArray and it then contains some other data.

To fix your code you need to either declare the array in a scope that lives long enough(the main function in your example) or allocate it on the heap. If you allocate it on the heap you need to free it either manually, or in C++ using RAII.

One alternative I missed(probably even the best one here) is to wrap your array into a struct and thus make it a value type. Then returning it creates a copy which survives the function return. See tp1's answer for details on this.

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By trying to access it, you invoke undefined behavior. –  ruslik Dec 31 '10 at 13:32
    
Or you could declare it static. –  Oystein Dec 31 '10 at 13:47
2  
Making it static has quite different semantics, especially in multi threaded applications unless the content of the array is constant. –  CodesInChaos Dec 31 '10 at 13:51
3  
Sure, but it is a way to solve the problem and should be pointed out, right? –  Oystein Dec 31 '10 at 13:57
1  
Pointing it out is of course useful, but you need to point out the downsides too, so your first comment was a bit incomplete. –  CodesInChaos Dec 31 '10 at 14:29
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You can't access a local variable once it goes out of scope. This is what it means to be a local variable.

When you are accessing the array in the replaceNumberAndPrint function the result is undefined. The fact it appears to work first time is just a fortunate coincidence. Probably the memory location you are pointing to is unallocated on the stack and is still correctly set for the first call, but the call to printf then overwrites this by pushing values onto the stack during its operation which is why the second call to printf displays something different.

You need to store the array data on the heap and pass a pointer, or in a variable that remains in scope (e.g. a global or something scoped within the main function).

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+1 for "This is what it means to be a local variable" –  Oystein Dec 31 '10 at 13:48
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Try something like that. The way you do it "kills" myArray cause if it locally defined.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void replaceNumberAndPrint(int * array) {
 printf("%i\n", array[0]);
 printf("%i\n", array[1]);
 printf("%i\n" , array[2]);
 free(array);
}

int * getArray() {
 int * myArray = malloc(sizeof(int) * 3);
 myArray[0] = 4;
 myArray[1] = 64;
 myArray[2] = 23;
 //{4, 65, 23};
 return myArray;
}

int main() {
 replaceNumberAndPrint(getArray());
}

More : http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/malloc/

Edit: As Comments correctly pointed out: A better way to do it would be that :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void replaceNumberAndPrint(int * array) {
    if(!array)
        return;

    printf("%i\n", array[0]);
    printf("%i\n", array[1]);
    printf("%i\n" , array[2]);
}

int * createArray() {
    int * myArray = malloc(sizeof(int) * 3);

    if(!myArray)
        return 0;

    myArray[0] = 4;
    myArray[1] = 64;
    myArray[2] = 23;
    return myArray;
}

int main() {
    int * array = createArray();
    if(array)
    {
        replaceNumberAndPrint(array);
        free(array);
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
Be sure to comment this "feature" REALLY good if you use this in your code. Allocating memory by one function and releasing it by another is VERY dangerous unless properly documented and even then is prone to memory leaks! Would be better to allocate the array in main and release it when it is no longer needed. –  Shaihi Dec 31 '10 at 13:40
    
@Shaihi, this is true, also this piece of code is very naive cause it doesn't check whether malloc() allocated successfully. But I think OP will understand the whole point. –  Muggen Dec 31 '10 at 13:42
2  
While this works it's ugly. You should change the function names(getArray => createArray) to describe their behavior better. And having replaceNumberAndPrint delete the source array doesn't seem like a good idea to me. I'd rather separate deleting and printing into two different functions. –  CodesInChaos Dec 31 '10 at 13:42
    
Added a more "Correct" version. –  Muggen Dec 31 '10 at 13:48
2  
@Muggen: don't you prefer array[i] instead of *(array+i)? –  jweyrich Dec 31 '10 at 13:50
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myArray goes out of scope as soon as you leave getArray. You need to allocate space for it on the heap instead.

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Your code invokes Undefined Behaviour because myArray goes out of scope as soon as getArray() returns and any attempt to use (dereference) the dangling pointer is UB.

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Local variables go out of scope upon return, so you can't return a pointer to a local variable.

You need to allocate it dynamically (on the heap), using malloc or new. Example:

int *create_array(void) {
    int *array = malloc(3 * sizeof(int));
    assert(array != NULL);
    array[0] = 4;
    array[1] = 65;
    array[2] = 23;
    return array;
 }
 void destroy_array(int *array) {
     free(array);
 }
 int main(int argc, char **argv) {
     int *array = create_array();
     for (size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
         printf("%d\n", array[i]);
     destroy_array(array);
     return 0;
 }

Alternatively, you can declare the array as static, keeping in mind the semantics are different. Example:

int *get_array(void) {
    static int array[] = { 4, 65, 23 };
    return array;
 }
 int main(int argc, char **argv) {
     int *array = get_array();
     for (size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
         printf("%d\n", array[i]);
     return 0;
 }

If you don't know what static means, read this question & answer.

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+1 For Static implementation and for the Link. Nice Answer. –  Muggen Dec 31 '10 at 16:23
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Right way to do this is as follows:

struct Arr {
   int array[3];
};
Arr get_array() {
   Arr a;
   a.array[0] = 4;
   a.array[1] = 65;
   a.array[2] = 23;
   return a;
}
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
   Arr a = get_array();
   for(size_t i=0; i<3; i++)
       printf("%d\n", a.array[i]);
   return 0;
}

To understand why you need to do this, you need to know how sizeof(array) works. C (and thus c++) tries hard to avoid copying the array, and you need the struct to go past that. Why copying is needed is because of scopes -- the get_array() function's scope disappears and every value still needed from that scope will need to be copied to calling scope.

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I know this was quite some time ago, but would you not either need to typedef or allocate the structure like struct Arr a? –  sherrellbc Oct 2 '13 at 16:07
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In this code you have used pointer to local objects but when a function returns all local variables goes out of scope. If you will allocate memory (using malloc() function for allocation) then no data will be lost or overwrite.

int* getArray(int size) {
    int *myArray = (int*)malloc(size*sizeof(int));
    myArray[0] = 4;
    myArray[1] = 65;
    myArray[2] = 23;
    return myArray;
}

int main() {
    int i;
    int *vector = getArray(3);
    for(i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        printf("%i\n",vector[i]);
    }
    getch();
    return 0;
}

This code will print all the array elements and no overwritten will be happened.

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Your code leaks... not a good example. –  Mat Jan 7 at 11:23
    
Thanks Mat for telling me... –  aquib_geek Jan 10 at 16:08
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