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I'm using reflection to call a generic method with a type determined at runtime. My code is as follows:

Type tType = Type.GetType(pLoadOut.Type);
MethodInfo method = typeof(ApiSerialiseHelper).GetMethod("Deserialise", new Type[] { typeof(string) });
MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(tType);
generic.Invoke(obj, new object[] { pLoadOut.Data });

This works ok. However the generic.Invoke method returns an object, but what I would like is the type determined at runtime. Is this possible with this approach, or is there a better option?

Mark

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What do you mean by but what I would like is the type determined at runtime? –  decyclone Dec 31 '10 at 13:52
    
Assuming tType has a method called DoSomething(). I would like to be able to do this; var a = generic.Invoke(obj, new object[] { pLoadOut.Data }); a.DoSomething(); –  markpirvine Dec 31 '10 at 13:59
    
What is the actual static return type of Deserialize? Delegate variance might be useful to you. –  Ben Voigt Dec 31 '10 at 14:29
    
Deserialize is a generic method, the return type is T. What is Delegate variance? Any good examples/articles? –  markpirvine Dec 31 '10 at 14:45
    
Delegate variance says that if you have, for example, a method that returns List, you can bind a delegate that returns IList to that method. Eric Lippert has written quite a bit about it, I'll find you a link in a sec... I've also got example code in my answer. –  Ben Voigt Dec 31 '10 at 21:16
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The type IS determined at runtime. It's the type of the reference variable that is object, the actual instance is strongly typed.

That's the best that can be done, considering that you're using reflection to dynamically get access to a method that the compiler has no type information for -- it might not even exist in the build environment.

EDIT: If you know something about the type returned by Deserialize, then you can take advantage of delegate variance. For example:

Type tType = Type.GetType(pLoadOut.Type);
MethodInfo method = typeof(ApiSerialiseHelper).GetMethod("Deserialise", new Type[] { typeof(string) });
MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(tType);
Converter<string,ISomething> deser = (Converter<string,ISomething>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Converter<string,ISomething>),generic);
ISomething result = deser(pLoadOut.Data);
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If the returned objects have a common ancestor or interface, then you can cast to them. If they don't, then they should, e.g. if all possible return types have a method named DoSomething(), then make an interface that has a method DoSomething().

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And that interface must be known at compile-time, even if the most derived type is not. –  Ben Voigt Dec 31 '10 at 14:25
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