Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a large 2D matrix that is 1000 x 1000. I want to reshape this so that it is one column (or row). For example, if the matrix was:

A B C
1 4 7
2 5 8
3 6 9

I want to turn it in to:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

I do not need to preserve the column headers, just the order of the data. How do I do this using reshape2 (which is the package that I presumed was the easiest to use)?


Just to clarify, I mentioned reshape as I thought it was the best way of doing this. I can see that there are simpler methods which I am perfectly happy with.

share|improve this question
2  
Whenever you vectorize a matrix, keep in mind that it always goes columns first. When you need to preserve the row order, then do c(t(some.matrix)). –  Joris Meys Dec 31 '10 at 15:52
    
Changed the title to reflect the question asked. BTW, I wonder where that reshape-fetish is coming from. I see so many questions asking for a reshape answer to a problem for which reshape never was built in the first place. –  Joris Meys Dec 31 '10 at 15:55
2  
@Joris perhaps "If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail."? –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 31 '10 at 16:03
    
@Joris - ignorance really. I just assumed what I wanted to do was not a standard operation. I use ggplot2 where reshape2 is sometimes mentioned as they are both made by Hadley Wickham. –  celenius Dec 31 '10 at 17:57
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I think it will be difficult to find a more compact method than:

c(m)
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

However, if you want to retain a matrix structure, then this reworking of the dim attribute would be be effective:

dim(m) <- c(dim(m)[1]*dim(m)[2], 1)
m
      [,1]
 [1,]    1
 [2,]    2
 [3,]    3
 [4,]    4
 [5,]    5
 [6,]    6
 [7,]    7
 [8,]    8
 [9,]    9

There would be more compact methods of getting the product of the dimensions but the above method emphasizes that the dim attribute is a two element vector for matrices. Other ways of getting the "9" in that example include:

> prod(dim(m))
[1] 9
> length(m)
[1] 9
share|improve this answer
1  
you can just do cbind(c(m)) to make it a one-column matrix –  Prasad Chalasani Dec 31 '10 at 15:53
    
prod(dim(m))... –  hadley Dec 31 '10 at 18:37
2  
@hadley OK, what about prod(dim(m))? –  BondedDust Dec 31 '10 at 19:19
    
dim(m) <- c(prod(dim(m)), 1) is a bit nicer, and scales to any number of dimensions` –  hadley Jan 4 '11 at 14:18
    
That was what I intended a reader to do. The code prod(dim(m)) was offered as a replacement for the clunkier: dim(m)[1]*dim(m)[2] as a way of getting to 9. It was always intended to go into dim(m)<-c(prod(dim(m)), 1) and I guess that was why I couldn't figure out your comment. –  BondedDust Jan 4 '11 at 15:15
add comment

A possible solution, but without using reshape2:

> m <- matrix(c(1:9), ncol = 3)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    4    7
[2,]    2    5    8
[3,]    3    6    9
> as.vector(m)
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
share|improve this answer
1  
as.vector(m) is about half the speed of c(m) - not that timing is likely to matter that much here. –  Spacedman Dec 31 '10 at 19:17
add comment

Come on R guys, lets give the OP a reshape2 solution:

> m <- matrix(c(1:9), ncol = 3)
> melt(m)$value
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

I just cant be bothered to test how much slower it is than c(m). It is the same, though:

> identical(c(m),melt(m)$value)
[1] TRUE

[EDIT: oh heck who am I kidding:]

> system.time(for(i in 1:1000){z=melt(m)$value})
   user  system elapsed 
  1.653   0.004   1.662 
> system.time(for(i in 1:1000){z=c(m)})
   user  system elapsed 
  0.004   0.000   0.004 
share|improve this answer
    
The reshape solution is several orders of magnitude slower when tested on a 1000 x 1000 matrix... as you can see via your edit. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 31 '10 at 16:10
    
+1 for the timings. funny reshape-hack though, I wouldn't have thought of it. For obvious reasons ;-) –  Joris Meys Dec 31 '10 at 17:10
    
Just for amusement: reshape2::melt is about 25% faster than reshape::melt (approx. 7.7 vs 10.3 seconds for 10000 reps) although still about 400 times slower than c(m) ... –  Ben Bolker Jan 1 '11 at 14:53
add comment

as.vector(m) should be little more efficient then c(m):

> library(rbenchmark)
> m <- diag(5000)
> benchmark(
+   vect = as.vector(m), 
+   conc = c(m), 
+   replications=100
+ )
  test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
2 conc          100  12.699    1.177     6.952    5.754          0         0
1 vect          100  10.785    1.000     4.858    5.933          0         0
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.