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So I'm wondering about how unit testing works in regards to dealing external dependencies. Here and elsewhere I've become familiar with dependency injection, and how that allows us to test a unit (A) of code. However, I'm confused about how to test other units (B and C) which are now possess the external dependency so they can inject it into the original unit (A).

For example, say some class Foo uses an external dependency...

class Foo
{
    private ExternalDependency ed;
    public int doSomethingWithExternalDependency() {...}
}

And class Bar makes use off Foo...

class Bar
{
    public int doSomethingWithFoo
    {
        Foo f = new Foo();
        int x = f.doSomethingWithExternalDependency();
        // Do some more stuff ...
        return result;
    }
}

Now, I know that I can use dependency injection so that I can test Foo, but then how do I test Bar? I guess, I can, again, use dependency injection, but at some point some unit needs to actually create the external dependency; so how do I test that unit?

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6  
+1 for the title alone :) However, you might want to tag this with the language you are asking about. – Phrogz Dec 31 '10 at 15:02
3  
@Phrogz I can't see how the language matters here. – Jonathon Faust Dec 31 '10 at 15:08
10  
@Phrogz perhaps @guy is one of the rare breed of developers that cares less about the language than the ideas and concepts – David Heffernan Dec 31 '10 at 15:09
    
You're right, language mostly doesn't matter, except to understand scoping rules and other concepts conveyed by "public" and classes. An answer for Ruby might differ from one for C or F#. – Phrogz Dec 31 '10 at 17:47
up vote 16 down vote accepted

The examples you provide do not use Dependency Injection. Instead, Bar should use Constructor Injection to get a Foo instance, but there's no point in injecting a concrete class. Instead, you should extract an interface from Foo (let's call it IFoo) and inject that into Bar:

public class Bar
{
    private IFoo f;

    public Bar(IFoo f)
    {
        this.f = f;
    }

    public int doSomethingWithFoo
    {
        int x = this.f.doSomethingWithExternalDependency();
        // Do some more stuff ...
        return result;
    }
}

This enables you to always decouple consumers and dependencies.

Yes, there will still be a place where you must compose the entire application's object graph. We call this place the Composition Root. It's a application infrastructure component, so you don't need to unit test it.

In most cases you should consider using a DI Container for that part, and then apply the Register Resolve Release pattern.

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I wouldn't create an interface just to inject something. I would make an interface after there is an actuated need for polymorphism, due to tests or production code having to inject another implementation. Otherwise unnecessary interfaces can make the code harder to understand. – Esko Luontola Jan 2 '11 at 16:31
1  
You wouldn't be doing it 'just to inject'. You would be doing it to introduce a Seam into your code; to decouple things that are tightly coupled. However, that said I agree that unnecessary interfaces make the code harder to understand, which is why we should give each interface a good degree of thought: blog.ploeh.dk/2010/12/03/TowardsBetterAbstractions.aspx – Mark Seemann Jan 2 '11 at 16:45

Keep in mind the difference between unit testing and integration testing. In the former, the dependency would be mocked whereby it provides expected behavior for the purpose of testing the class which consumes the dependency. In the latter, an actual instance of the dependency is initialized to see if the whole thing works end-to-end.

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In order to use Dependency Injection, your classes would have their dependencies injected into them (several ways to do that - constructor injection, property injection) and would not instantiate them themselves, as you do in your examples.

Additionally, one would extract the interface of each dependency to help with testability and use the interface instead of an implementation type as the dependency.

class Foo
{
    private IExternalDependency ed;
    public int doSomethingWithExternalDependency() {...}

    public Foo(IExternalDependency extdep)
    {
      ed = extdep;
    }
}

What most people do is use a mocking framework to mock the dependencies when testing.

You can mock any object that the class under test depends on (including behavior and return values) - pass the mocks to the class as its dependencies.

This allows you to test the class without relying on the behavior of its (implemented) dependencies.

In some cases, you may want to use fakes or stubs instead of a mocking framework. See this article by Martin Fowler about the differences.


As for getting all the dependencies, all the way down - one uses an IoC container. This is a registry of all of the dependencies in your system and understands how to instantiate each and every class with its dependencies.

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Careful, in some places this is considered bullying the dependencies. – bmargulies Dec 31 '10 at 15:16

When you unit test a class, you should mock its dependencies, to test your class in isolation -- this is regardless of dependency injection.

The answer to your question about Bar is: yes, you should inject Foo. Once you go down the DI path, you will use it across your entire stack. If you really need a new Foo for every doSomethingWithFoo call, you might want to inject a FooFactory (which you can then mock for testing purposes), if you want a single Bar to use many Foos.

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I'd like to stress out that in case of unit testing you should have two separate sets of tests: one for Foo.doSomethingWithExternalDependency and another one for Bar.doSomethingWithFoo. In the latter set create mock implementaion of Foo and you test just doSomethingWithFoo assuming that doSomethingWithExternalDependency works properly. You test doSomethingWithExternalDependency in a separate test set.

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