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I was going through the source of google guice, and found an unfamiliar piece of code. It would be great learning if someone can clarify it.

I have very basic understanding of inner classes, as they keep the implementation details close to the public interface. Otherwise the inner class may pollute the namespace.

Now, I see the below lines at

public static final Scope SINGLETON = new Scope() {
    public <T> Provider<T> scope(final Key<T> key, final Provider<T> creator) {
      return new Provider<T>() {
.........
}

It assign an inner class instance to the static variable, but Scope is an interface defined as (at)

public interface Scope

Part 1:

Is it possible to instantiate the interface?? or is it a succinct syntax for an anonymous implementation of an interface??

Part 2:

If anyone can explain what the author is intended by multiple nested classes above (Scope and Provider), and why it make sense to implement this way, it would help me to understand. thanks.

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possible duplicate of This appears to create an object from an interface; how does it work? –  Bert F Dec 31 '10 at 15:58
    
@Bert, agreed, this question is not specific to guice, it is a generic Java question. –  Mike Miller Jan 7 '11 at 19:12
    
@Mike - good eyes - tags updated for future searchers –  Bert F Jan 7 '11 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The {}-block after creates an anonymous inner class which implements the interface given.

Frequently seen with Runnable too.

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thanks for the clarification, that validate my assumption. can you give some pointer to part, which I marked correctly in the qn. thanks again for ur time. –  bsr Dec 31 '10 at 16:08
    
Seen by the compiler after the invocation it is a Scopeand you can only use it as such, since it cannot be cast to anything else (remember it doesn't have a name you can use). The reason for this is simply that you want a Scope that returns a Provider and the author did not see any reason for giving either of these a named implementation. Probably due to it being simple. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 31 '10 at 16:34

Is it possible to instantiate the interface? or is it a succinct syntax for an anonymous implementation of an interface?

Yup and yup.

This appears to create an object from an interface; how does it work?

Could anyone please explain this Java syntax?

Example 3.11 instantiates the Enumeration interface in http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/java-ent/jnut/ch03_12.htm

public java.util.Enumeration enumerate() {
  // The anonymous class is defined as part of the return statement
  return new java.util.Enumeration() { 
      ....
  };  // Note the required semicolon: it terminates the return statement
}

If anyone can explain what the author is intended by multiple nested classes above

Nothing special about nesting - both are anonymous classes and use an anonymous class for the same reason you use anonymous classes anywhere else: when you have a single-use implementation for an interface or subclass, i.e. you have no reason to separate definition/implementation from use.

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