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i have this code below that loops through a data structure builds up a dictionary.

I have this code duplicated multiple times with the only difference being the Key to the dictionary

so in the below code it happens to be:

  task.Project + task.Name

that is the key to the dictionary but in other cases its just:

 task.Project

or just

 task.Name

here is an example of one of hte hard coded "Bucket" methods.

My goal is to have a generic "Bucket" method where i can have a callback or some way to pass in the function for calculating the key.

What is the best way of doing this ??

private Dictionary<string, TeamHours> BucketByProjectTask(Dictionary<string, TimeBooking> timebookings)
{
    Dictionary<string, TeamHours> dict = new Dictionary<string, TeamHours>();

    foreach (var name in timebookings.Keys)
    {
        TimeBooking tb = timebookings[name];
        Person p = tb.Person;

        foreach (var booking in tb.WeeklyTimeBookings.Keys)
        {
            var item = tb.WeeklyTimeBookings[booking];
            foreach (var task in item.TaskSlices)
            {
                if (dict.ContainsKey(task.Project + task.Name))
                {
                    TeamHours th = dict[task.Project + task.Name];
                    th.Hours = th.Hours + task.Hours;
                }
                else
                {
                    TeamHours th = new TeamHours();
                    th.Hours = task.Hours;
                    th.Project = task.Project;
                    th.Task = task.Name;
                    th.Workstream = tb.Person.OrganisationalUnitName;
                    dict[task.Project + task.Name] = th;
                }
            }

        }

    }
    return dict;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, you mostly answered the question yourself. Either pass a delegate into the method or inherit different implementations and specialize by implementing an abstract method. Another option is separating the key-building algorithm as an interface, which leads to best separation of concerns, but the overhead might be too much for simple scenarios.

Option 1 — delegates

private Dictionary<string, TeamHours> BucketByProjectTask(Dictionary<string, TimeBooking> timebookings, Func<string, Task> getTaskKey)
{
    …
    dict[getTaskKey(task)] = th;
    …
}

Good for use in highly-localized scenarios (i.e. implementation and usages private to a single class) with just a few simple key-building expressions.

Option 2 — abstract class and method

class abstract BucketAlgorithm
{
    protected abstract string GetTaskKey(Task task);


    public  Dictionary<string, TeamHours> BucketByProjectTask(Dictionary<string, TimeBooking> timebookings)
    {
        …
        dict[GetTaskKey(task)] = th;
        …
    }
}

class SpecificBucketAlgorithm : BucketAlgorithm
{
    protected override string GetTaskKey(Task task) { … }
}

Good for use within a medium scope like just one assembly, where there's no need for better separation of concerns (interfaces from implementation), or where are several non-trivial key-building algorithms required.

Option 3 — decomposed into an interface

interface ITaskKeyGenerator
{
    string GetTaskKey(Task task);
}

class BucketAlgorithm
{
    public BucketAlgorithm(ITaskKeyGenerator taskKeyGenerator)
    {
        this.taskKeyGenerator = taskKeyGenerator;
    }

    private ITaskKeyGenerator taskKeyGenerator;

    public  Dictionary<string, TeamHours> BucketByProjectTask(Dictionary<string, TimeBooking> timebookings)
    {
        …
        dict[taskKeyGenerator.GetTaskKey(task)] = th;
        …
    }
}

Good for scenarios where thorough separation of concerns is required or where multiple complex key-building algorithms might exist, or even be provided from the “outside” by users of an API.

share|improve this answer
    
what would the code look like that calls into that function for option #1 ?? Also, i think you have a typo in your option #1 answer –  leora Dec 31 '10 at 18:18
    
@ooo … = BucketByProjectTask(…, task => task.Project + task.Name) for example. –  Ondrej Tucny Dec 31 '10 at 18:19
    
thanks . . turns out that i was almost doing this but i had another subtle bug that threw me off . . –  leora Dec 31 '10 at 18:23
    
Edited my answer with another option (interface-based design) and basic usage recommendations. –  Ondrej Tucny Dec 31 '10 at 18:28

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