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I have written the code below to calculate the date of "two years ago" based off the "today's date", as well as the date of "5 days ahead".

I want to make a dynamic version of the code, following the same comparison principle. For example, I want the user to insert the numbers of years and days and compare it to today's date.


Code:

public class Calendar1{
    private static void doCalendarTime() {
        System.out.print("*************************************************");
        Date now = Calendar.getInstance().getTime();
        System.out.print("  \n Calendar.getInstance().getTime() : " + now);
        System.out.println();
    }

    private static void doSimpleDateFormat() {
        System.out.print("*************************************************");
        System.out.print("\n\nSIMPLE DATE FORMAT\n");
        System.out.print("*************************************************");
        // Get today's date
        Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();
        SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("E yyyy.MM.dd 'at' hh:mm:ss a zzz");
        System.out.print(" \n It is now : " + formatter.format(now.getTime()));
        System.out.println();
    }

    private static void doAdd() {
        System.out.println("ADD / SUBTRACT CALENDAR / DATEs");
        System.out.println("=================================================================");
        // Get today's date
        Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar working;
        SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("E yyyy.MM.dd 'at' hh:mm:ss a zzz");
        working = (Calendar) now.clone();
        working.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, - (365 * 2));
        System.out.println ("  Two years ago it was: " + formatter.format(working.getTime()));
        working = (Calendar) now.clone();
        working.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, + 5);
        System.out.println("  In five days it will be: " + formatter.format(working.getTime()));
        System.out.println();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println();
        doCalendarTime();
        doSimpleDateFormat();
        doAdd();

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What kind of input do you want the user to give, and how does that map to the output you want? What have you tried to do to solve that problem, and what difficulties did you encounter? –  RD1 Dec 31 '10 at 21:53
    
ok , for example the day of today is 1-1-2011 user want know the date before 5 years (for example) from this day 1-1-2011 . i want the user insert the number of years or day 1,2,3,4 .... I am tried to change code and put method to can user input but there is alot mistake on it . –  MANAL Dec 31 '10 at 21:59
    
In that case, what you should post is the method that you tried to implement, and perhaps someone can help point out what you did wrong. –  RD1 Dec 31 '10 at 22:05

1 Answer 1

Java's standard date-time APIs are not very good for operations on dates. If you want to do real calculations on dates, I suggest a library like Joda-Time, which has much better functionality for such cases.


Here is the a Joda-Time code following the same example used on the question:

DateTime now = new DateTime();
DateTime twoYearsAgo = now.minusYears(2);
DateTime fiveDaysFromNow = now.plusDays(5);

DateTimeFormatter formatter = new DateTimeFormatterBuilder()
   .appendPattern("E yyyy.MM.dd 'at' hh:mm:ss a zzz")
   .toFormatter();

System.out.println(formatter.print(twoYearsAgo));
System.out.println(formatter.print(fiveDaysFromNow));

This assumes you want to work with the system's default time-zone (meridian). If that is not the case, there is a constructor's argument to set the time-zone that will be used.

share|improve this answer
    
ps: this of course assumes you want to work in the system default timezone. If not, there's a constructor argument you can give the DateTime class to set the timezone. –  Matt Jul 17 '12 at 2:25

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