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The embedded C I'm using doesn't have a round() function it it's math lib, what would be a concise way to implement this in C? I was thinking of printing it to a string, looking for the decimal place, then finding the first char after the period, then rounding up if >= 5, else down. etc. Was wondering if there's something more clever.

Thanks, Fred

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3  
There must be something better than that... –  Andreas Rejbrand Dec 31 '10 at 22:29
2  
Note that round() is in C99, so it's not necessarily in all C libraries anyway. –  chrisaycock Dec 31 '10 at 22:32
    
Is floor or ceil functions available? –  Cratylus Dec 31 '10 at 22:37
3  
Rounding is quite pointless, only humans care about it. The only ones that get a bit impatient about having to read 7 or 15 digits in the result. The machine doesn't care, it doesn't get tired. Not a problem, printf() rounds quite nicely. Just in case: don't implement an accounting program in C without having a library that calculates in base 10. –  Hans Passant Dec 31 '10 at 23:09
    
Out of curiosity, which antediluvian math library are you being subjected to? –  Stephen Canon Jan 1 '11 at 3:13
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could re-invent the wheel, as many other answers suggest. Alternately, you could use someone else's wheel -- I'd suggest Newlib's, which is BSD-licensed and intended for use on embedded systems. It properly handles negative numbers, NaNs, infinities, and cases which are not representable as integers (due to being too large), as well as doing so in an efficient manner that uses exponents and masking rather than generally-costlier floating-point operations. In addition, it's regularly tested, so you know it doesn't have glaring corner-case bugs in it.

The Newlib source can be a bit awkward to navigate, so here are the bits you want:

Float version: http://sourceware.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/~checkout~/src/newlib/libm/common/sf_round.c?rev=1.4&content-type=text/plain&cvsroot=src

Double version: http://sourceware.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/~checkout~/src/newlib/libm/common/s_round.c?rev=1.2&content-type=text/plain&cvsroot=src

Word-extraction macros defined here: http://sourceware.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/~checkout~/src/newlib/libm/common/fdlibm.h?rev=1.9&content-type=text/plain&cvsroot=src

If you need other files from there, the parent directory is this one: http://sourceware.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb.cgi/src/newlib/libm/common/?cvsroot=src

For the record, here's the code for the float version. As you can see, there's a bit of complexity required to deal with all the possible cases correctly.

float roundf(x)
{
  int signbit;
  __uint32_t w;
  /* Most significant word, least significant word. */
  int exponent_less_127;

  GET_FLOAT_WORD(w, x);

  /* Extract sign bit. */
  signbit = w & 0x80000000;

  /* Extract exponent field. */
  exponent_less_127 = (int)((w & 0x7f800000) >> 23) - 127;

  if (exponent_less_127 < 23)
    {
      if (exponent_less_127 < 0)
        {
          w &= 0x80000000;
          if (exponent_less_127 == -1)
            /* Result is +1.0 or -1.0. */
            w |= ((__uint32_t)127 << 23);
        }
      else
        {
          unsigned int exponent_mask = 0x007fffff >> exponent_less_127;
          if ((w & exponent_mask) == 0)
            /* x has an integral value. */
            return x;

          w += 0x00400000 >> exponent_less_127;
          w &= ~exponent_mask;
        }
    }
  else
    {
      if (exponent_less_127 == 128)
        /* x is NaN or infinite. */
        return x + x;
      else
        return x;
    }
  SET_FLOAT_WORD(x, w);
  return x;
}
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Damn good suggestion. –  Michael Burr Jan 1 '11 at 1:41
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int round(double x)
{
    if (x < 0.0)
        return (int)(x - 0.5);
    else
        return (int)(x + 0.5);
}
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1  
The C library function round( ) returns a double, not an int. –  Stephen Canon Dec 31 '10 at 23:11
8  
Note also that this implementation has undefined behavior for x outside the range of values representable by integers. –  Stephen Canon Dec 31 '10 at 23:28
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int round(float x)
{
    return (int)(x + 0.5);
}

Caveat: Only works on positive numbers.

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2  
You're forgetting about negative numbers: round(-1.3) = 0 in your case. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Dec 31 '10 at 22:43
4  
@Niki: I'm not forgetting about them; I just chose to ignore them. Adding support for them is trivial (see dan04's answer) and my goal was to minimally illustrate a method other than the stringy one the OP described. –  nmichaels Dec 31 '10 at 22:45
2  
Since casting will round toward zero, this will only work if x is positive. –  splicer Dec 31 '10 at 22:46
2  
The C library function round( ) returns a double, not an int. –  Stephen Canon Dec 31 '10 at 23:12
2  
And the argument should be double x not float x, floats would be float roundf(float x). I think you'll also get undefined behavior if x is outside the [INT_MIN,INT_MAX] interval. –  mu is too short Jan 1 '11 at 0:44
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IEEE 754 recommends the "round half to even" approach: if the fractional part of d is 0.5 then round to the nearest even integer. The problem is that rounding a fractional part of 0.5 the same direction introduces bias in the results; so, you have to round a fractional 0.5 up half the time and down half the time, hence the "round to the nearest even integer" bit, rounding to the nearest odd would also work as would flipping a fair coin to determine which way to go.

I think something more like this would be IEEE-correct:

#include <math.h>

int is_even(double d) {
    double int_part;
    modf(d / 2.0, &int_part);
    return 2.0 * int_part == d;
}

double round_ieee_754(double d) {
    double i = floor(d);
    d -= i;
    if(d < 0.5)
        return i;
    if(d > 0.5)
        return i + 1.0;
    if(is_even(i))
        return i;
    return i + 1.0;
}

And this one should be C99-ish (which appears to specify that numbers with fractional parts of 0.5 should be rounded away from zero):

#include <math.h>
double round_c99(double x) {
    return (x >= 0.0) ? floor(x + 0.5) : ceil(x - 0.5);
}

And a more compact version of my first round_c99(), this one handles crossing the 56bit mantissa boundary better by not relying on x+0.5 or x-0.5 being sensible things to do:

#include <math.h>
double round_c99(double d) {
    double int_part, frac_part;
    frac_part = modf(d, &int_part);
    if(fabs(frac_part) < 0.5)
        return int_part;
    return int_part > 0.0 ? int_part + 1.0 : int_part - 1.0;
}

This will have problems if |int_part| >> 1 but rounding a double with a large exponent is pointless. I'm sure there are NaN in all three as well but my masochism has limits and numerical programming really isn't my thing.

Floating point computation has ample room for subtle errors so concise may not be the best requirement.

An even better solution would be to beat your compiler vendor roughly about the face and neck until they provide a proper math library.

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1  
round( ) is fully specified by C99, and is distinct from the IEEE rounding functions. Note also that your function has undefined behavior if d is too large to be rounded to an int. –  Stephen Canon Dec 31 '10 at 23:26
    
@Stephen Canon: C99 specifies "round away from 0 on ties"? I can get around the undefined behavior quite easily if you have a handy even test for doubles, I haven't had to mess around with floating point issues since my data mining days in the 1990s. There's a reason for the last two sentences in my answer. –  mu is too short Dec 31 '10 at 23:44
    
I think Stephen Canon's issues are resolved. I still think thrashing the compiler vendor for an incomplete math library is the most desirable approach here. –  mu is too short Jan 1 '11 at 0:02
1  
I disagree. One of the chief virtues of IEEE-754 is that it requires reasonable results for all inputs, even unreasonable ones. If you care about numerical correctness and require the behavior of the C99 round( ) function, you will use said function, and not the IEEE rounding functions. The C standard (rightly) specifies that the function behave sensibly over the entire range, and it is folly not to adhere to that. (Of course, that doesn't mean that every answer on SO need be pedantically complete; the germ of the idea here is spot on, and you're free to leave it at that =) –  Stephen Canon Jan 1 '11 at 2:51
2  
Note that this all just goes to show the wisdom of your original suggestion: beat your compiler vendor roughly about the face and neck until they provide a proper math library. These are precisely the sort of issues that we library implementors are paid to worry about, and users of our libraries should not have to deal with them. –  Stephen Canon Jan 1 '11 at 2:59
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In the ancient days when rounding was not well defined across systems, we wrote a scaled rounding function that first multiplied the number so that the rounding was done by truncating the number.
To round to 2 decimal places, multiply by 100, add .5, truncate the results and divide by 100.
This is how it was done for Numerical Control machine tools when the controls couldn't run a NC program unless it was spot on (dead nuts).

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One way using a string operation

float var=1.2345;
char tmp[12]={0x0};
sprintf(tmp, "%.2f", var);
var=atof(tmp);

Another way using numeric operations

float var=1.2345;
int i=0;
var*=100;
i=var;
var=i;
var/=100;
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