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We have following type of "Unique ID" column for many tables in the database (Oracle). It is a string with following format

<randomnumber>-<ascendingnumber>-<machinename>

So we have some thing like this

U1234-12345-NBBJD
U1234-12346-NBBJD
U1234-12347-NBBJD
U1234-12348-NBBJD
U1234-12349-NBBJD

The UID value is unique, we have unique index on them. Does the following format is more efficient than above for index scans?

NBBJD-U1234-12345
NBBJD-U1234-12346
NBBJD-U1234-12347
NBBJD-U1234-12348
NBBJD-U1234-12349
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There isn't really a good answer for this, as it depends upon how you query the data. If you are typically trying to look up specific records by UNIQUE_ID then it doesn't matter. However, if you are looking up records by machinename then you would probably want that at the front of your column.

Better yet, make each of these values a separate column, and have a truly synthetic primary key based off of a sequence or GUID. That way the ordering of the data isn't an issue at all. You'll thank yourself later on.

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+1 for the suggestion to break these components out into separate columns (potentially with a view that generates the composite value and a function-based index to allow users to search on the composite value efficiently) –  Justin Cave Jan 1 '11 at 5:02
    
Query is always done by UNIQUE_ID. Thank you! –  Jayan Jan 4 '11 at 9:33

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