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I have two expressions of type Expression<Func<T, bool>> and I want to take to OR, AND or NOT of these and get a new expression of the same type

Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1;
Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2;

...

//how to do this (the code below will obviously not work)
Expression<Func<T, bool>> andExpression = expr AND expr2
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2  
Very useful post I got from Google: LINQ to Entities: Combining Predicates –  Thomas C. G. de Vilhena Jan 1 at 18:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 81 down vote accepted

Well, you can use Expression.AndAlso / OrElse etc to combine logical expressions, but the problem is the parameters; are you working with the same ParameterExpression in expr1 and expr2? If so, it is easier:

var body = Expression.AndAlso(expr1.Body, expr2.Body);
var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T,bool>>(body, expr1.Parameters[0]);

This also works well to negate a single operation:

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Not<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr)
{
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
        Expression.Not(expr.Body), expr.Parameters[0]);
}

Otherwise, depending on the LINQ provider, you might be able to combine them with Invoke:

// OrElse is very similar...
static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> left,
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> right)
{
    var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
    var body = Expression.AndAlso(
            Expression.Invoke(left, param),
            Expression.Invoke(right, param)
        );
    var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, param);
    return lambda;
}

Somewhere, I have got some code that re-writes an expression-tree replacing nodes to remove the need for Invoke, but it is quite lengthy (and I can't remember where I left it...)


Generalized version that picks the simplest route:

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
{
    // need to detect whether they use the same
    // parameter instance; if not, they need fixing
    ParameterExpression param = expr1.Parameters[0];
    if (ReferenceEquals(param, expr2.Parameters[0]))
    {
        // simple version
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
            Expression.AndAlso(expr1.Body, expr2.Body), param);
    }
    // otherwise, keep expr1 "as is" and invoke expr2
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
        Expression.AndAlso(
            expr1.Body,
            Expression.Invoke(expr2, param)), param);
}
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Hey Marc, I tried out your first suggestion, in the your first code block above, but when I pass in the "lambda" expression<func<T,bool>> result in a Where method, I get an error saying the parameter is out of scope? any idea? cheers –  andy Jun 27 '09 at 5:52
    
@Andy - yes (see the first sentence) - you will get this if you are using different parameter instances in the two versions... I'll update with another option (but which doesn't work for all providers; LINQ-to-Objects and LINQ-to-SQL will be fine, but EF won't be...) –  Marc Gravell Jun 27 '09 at 9:20
    
D'oh! I've already covered this in the second version... it can be simplified a little bit, though (will update) –  Marc Gravell Jun 27 '09 at 9:23
1  
+1 the generalized version works like a charm, I used And instead of andalso, I thought linq to sql doesn't support andalso? –  Maslow Sep 4 '09 at 13:57
2  
@Maslow - here's a rewriter that can inline the trees to save Invoke: stackoverflow.com/questions/1717444/… –  Marc Gravell Mar 19 '11 at 21:12
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Joe Albahari (Author of C# 3.0 in a Nutshell and LINQPad) wrote a utility called PredicateBuilder which can be used to AND and OR functions together.

http://www.albahari.com/nutshell/predicatebuilder.aspx

While it works on functions it is open source so you can check it out and see how it works.

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1  
The best solution!! The choosen answer is not as clear as the PredicatedBuilder solution. +1 for that! –  Eduardo Xavier Oct 17 '11 at 16:51
    
@Eduardo: I disagree. PredicateBuilder's code is largely identical to the chosen answer, but the chosen answer provides explanation/code directly instead of via link. –  Brian Mar 30 '12 at 15:37
2  
PredicateBuilder DOES NOT WORK IN EF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It evaluates the query from the server then applies the desired predicate in memory instead of passing the predicate to SQL to restrict the result set. This is why PredicateBuilder is not desirable for this use case! BUYER BEWARE –  VulgarBinary Dec 12 '12 at 20:40
    
@VulgarBinary Perhaps you could spend some time figuring out why it doesn't work in EF5 instead of waiting for the answer to be spoon-fed to you. –  Cameron MacFarland Dec 13 '12 at 0:39
    
@CameronMacFarland I had already written a new PredicateBuilder myself that works and optimizes the expression trees. This snippet gave me the last piece I needed which was the visitor component. I was hardly waiting for anything to be spoon fed, if you seriously want your points back that badly edit your response and I'll take back the -1. However, when someone is looking to do something with Expression<Func<T,bool>> it generally means they want to use EF. Otherwise they would just have used Func<T,bool> –  VulgarBinary Dec 13 '12 at 1:01
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You can use Expression.AndAlso / OrElse to combine logical expressions, but you have to make sure the ParameterExpressions are the same.

I was having trouble with EF and the PredicateBuilder so I made my own without resorting to Invoke, that I could use like this:

var filterC = filterA.And(filterb);

Source code for my PredicateBuilder:

public static class PredicateBuilder {

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> And<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> a, Expression<Func<T, bool>> b) {    

        ParameterExpression p = a.Parameters[0];

        SubstExpressionVisitor visitor = new SubstExpressionVisitor();
        visitor.subst[b.Parameters[0]] = p;

        Expression body = Expression.AndAlso(a.Body, visitor.Visit(b.Body));
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p);
    }

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> a, Expression<Func<T, bool>> b) {    

        ParameterExpression p = a.Parameters[0];

        SubstExpressionVisitor visitor = new SubstExpressionVisitor();
        visitor.subst[b.Parameters[0]] = p;

        Expression body = Expression.OrElse(a.Body, visitor.Visit(b.Body));
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p);
    }   
}

And the utility class to substitute the parameters in a lambda:

internal class SubstExpressionVisitor : System.Linq.Expressions.ExpressionVisitor {
        public Dictionary<Expression, Expression> subst = new Dictionary<Expression, Expression>();

        protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node) {
            Expression newValue;
            if (subst.TryGetValue(node, out newValue)) {
                return newValue;
            }
            return node;
        }
    }
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This solution was the only one that allowed me to have x => x.Property == Value combined with arg => arg.Property2 == Value. Major props, a little terse and confusing but it works so I'm not going to complain. Kudos Adam :-) –  VulgarBinary Dec 12 '12 at 20:38
    
Thanks. I've found the code useful in a lot of places. –  Adam Tegen Dec 13 '12 at 19:10
    
This is a great solution. –  Aaron Stainback May 13 at 23:26
    
Adam, this solved a very annoying problem I was having using the SharePoint Client Object model's Linq provider - thanks for posting it. –  Chris McAtackney Jul 9 at 14:30
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If you provider does not support Invoke and you need to combine two expression, you can use an ExpressionVisitor to replace the parameter in the second expression by the parameter in the first expression.

class ParameterUpdateVisitor : ExpressionVisitor
{
    private ParameterExpression _oldParameter;
    private ParameterExpression _newParameter;

    public ParameterUpdateVisitor(ParameterExpression oldParameter, ParameterExpression newParameter)
    {
        _oldParameter = oldParameter;
        _newParameter = newParameter;
    }

    protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
    {
        if (object.ReferenceEquals(node, _oldParameter))
            return _newParameter;

        return base.VisitParameter(node);
    }
}

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> UpdateParameter<T>(
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr,
    ParameterExpression newParameter)
{
    var visitor = new ParameterUpdateVisitor(expr.Parameters[0], newParameter);
    var body = visitor.Visit(expr.Body);

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, newParameter);
}

[TestMethod]
public void ExpressionText()
{
    string text = "test";

    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr1 = p => p.Item1.Contains(text);
    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr2 = q => q.Item2.Contains(text);
    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr3 = UpdateParameter(expr2, expr1.Parameters[0]);

    var expr4 = Expression.Lambda<Func<Recording, bool>>(
        Expression.OrElse(expr1.Body, expr3.Body), expr1.Parameters[0]);

    var func = expr4.Compile();

    Assert.IsTrue(func(new Coco { Item1 = "caca", Item2 = "test pipi" }));
}
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This solved my particular problem where the other solution resulted in the same exception. Thanks. –  Shaun Wilson Mar 7 '13 at 23:49
    
This is a great solution. –  Aaron Stainback May 13 at 23:25
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