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Is it possible to create a custom control structure with several code blocks, in the fashion of before { block1 } then { block2 } finally { block3 }? The question is about the sugar part only - I know the functionality can be easily achieved by passing the three blocks to a method, like doInSequence(block1, block2, block3).

A real life example. For my testing utilities I'd like to create a structure like this:

getTime(1000) {
  // Stuff I want to repeat 1000 times.
} after { (n, t) => 
  println("Average time: " + t / n)
}

EDIT:

Finally I came up with this solution:

object MyTimer {
  def getTime(count: Int)(action : => Unit): MyTimer = {
    val start = System.currentTimeMillis()
    for(i <- 1 to count) { action }
    val time = System.currentTimeMillis() - start
    new MyTimer(count, time)
  }
}

class MyTimer(val count: Int, val time: Long) {
  def after(action: (Int, Long) => Unit) = {
    action(count, time)
  }
}

// Test
import MyTimer._

var i = 1
getTime(100) {
  println(i)
  i += 1
  Thread.sleep(10)
} after { (n, t) => 
  println("Average time: " + t.toDouble / n)
}

The output is:

1
2
3
...
99
100
Average time: 10.23

It is mostly based on the answer by Thomas Lockney, I just added the companion object to be able to import MyTimer._

Thank you all, guys.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For your given example, the key would be to have the return type of getTime have the after method on it. Depending on the context, you could use a single class or trait which wraps up both methods. Here's a very simplified example of how you might approach it:

class Example() {
  def getTime(x: Int)(f : => Unit): Example = {
    for(i <- 0 to x) {
      // do some stuff
      f
      // do some more stuff
    }
    // calculate your average
    this
  }
  def after(f: (Int, Double) => Unit) = {
    // do more stuff
  }
}
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It is not possible to have a "split" method, but you can emulate it.

class Finally(b: => Unit, t: => Unit) {
    def `finally`(f: => Unit) = {
        b
        try { t } finally { f }
    }
}

class Then(b: => Unit) {
    def `then`(t: => Unit): Finally = new Finally(b, t)
}

def before(b: => Unit): Then = new Then(b)

scala> before { println("Before") } `then` { 2 / 0 } `finally` { println("finally") }
Before
finally
[line4.apply$mcV$sp] (<console>:9)
(access lastException for the full trace)
scala>
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General principle. You can of course have f take parameters as well. (Note that the name of the methods have no meaning in this example.)

scala> class Foo {
     | def before(f: => Unit) = { f; this }
     | def then(f: => Unit) = { f; this }
     | def after(f: => Unit) = { f; this }
     | }
defined class Foo

scala> object Foo { def apply() = new Foo }
defined module Foo

scala> Foo() before { println("before...") } then {
     | println("then...") } after {
     | println("after...") }
before...
then...
after...
res12: Foo = Foo@1f16e6e
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That's embarrassingly simple :). Thanks –  Vilius Normantas Jan 3 '11 at 16:10

If you want these blocks to appear in the specific order, this change to Knut Arne Vedaa's answer would work:

class Foo1 {
  def before(f: => Unit) = { f; new Foo2 }
}

class Foo2 {
  def then(f: => Unit) = { f; new Foo3 }
}

...
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