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I am developing a console application. This application generates a self signed certificate and installs it in the current machine's certificate store. The steps involved are :-

  1. Generate a certificate
  2. Create a pfx file
  3. Install the pfx file

For these steps, I would need a password for protecting the private key and the pfx file. However these passwords are used only during the execution of the exe. Should I auto generate a password using some random number generation algorithm or accept the password as input from the user?

What are the security issues involved in both the scenarios?

Thanks for all the replies. Life time of the password is only till the pfx file gets generated. The program deletes the pfx file after installing it in the windows certificate store. In such a scenario I guess accepting password from user would not offer any security advantage over auto generating it.

I would like to add to this question further.

Once the password is available to the program how do u secure this password for its lifetime ? I am using .net and have read about secure strings in .net. But the secure string would have to be built from the string which doesn't solve the problem.

the code snippet looks like

string password = AutoGenerateOrGetPassword(); GenerateCertificateAndInstall(password);

How does one protect the password which is stored in memory during its lifetime ?

share|improve this question
    
What is the lifetime of the password-protected data? – Donal Fellows Jan 1 '11 at 11:19
    
Sounds like this whole process is not user-driven. In that case the user does not need to be involved, nor needs to know that there is a password anywhere... – Dr G Jan 1 '11 at 11:29

There shouldn't be any major security level difference or issues whether you auto generate or use a given password.

However, using an auto generated password will guarantee you a certain level of password complexity - this reduces to chances of brute force attack.

Using a given password would mean that someone (physically) knows the password. You won't know how complex the password user entered is going to be. Giving a password 'AAAA' will probably be less secure than a password that is given 'W0R!$%3D'.

Are you going to show the auto-generated password if it is done auto-generated manner?

I'd suggest that you go according to your software requirements. If this is not stated in the requirements, allow the user to choose between auto-generated or enter password.

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@user384706 please read the question again. – mauris Jan 1 '11 at 11:31

I think a discussion "accepting passwords vs auto generating the password" is meanless in the context of your qestion if you make shure that the pfx-file is deleted after the import. It will only exist until beeing imported into "machine's certificate store."

If the pfx-file must be backed up or transferd via email/usbstick i prefer the "accepting passwords form user" variant because Providing an inputform for the password plus implementing some logigic to make shure that the password ist strong enougn is easier than organizing that the user gets its pfx-file and the corresponding password via two independet channels. Sending pfx + password in one email is as secure as having no password at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the replies. Life time of the password is only till the pfx file gets generated. The program deletes the pfx file after installing it in the windows certificate store. In such a scenario I guess accepting password from user would not offer any security advantage over auto generating it. – Vivekanand Poojari Jan 1 '11 at 14:57

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