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I hope this isn't a stupid question but I have looked up every example I can find and it still seems like I have this code right and it still isn't working... I enter one number and it moves on to the next line of code instead of looping. I'm using this to fill an array with user input numbers. I appreciate any help, thanks.

for(i=0; i<9; i++);
{  
    System.out.println ("Please enter a number:");  
    Num[i] = keyboard.nextDouble();  
    Sum += Num[i];      
    Product *= Num[i];      
}   
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1  
This could should not even compile. The i is not declared. Unless you have i declared globally somewhere at the top. –  Rosdi Kasim Jan 1 '11 at 12:38
1  
By that rational, neither is Num, keyboard, Sum, or Product. –  Bert F Jan 1 '11 at 16:05
    
You should probably select an answer to your question. –  deterb Jan 10 '11 at 0:44

7 Answers 7

The ; at the end of the for loop is taken as an empty statement, the equivalent of an empty block for your for-loop. The compiler is reading your code as:

int i;
....
for(i=0; i<9; i++)
    /* no-op */;

/* inline block with no relation to for-loop */
{  
    System.out.println ("Please enter a number:");  
    Num[i] = keyboard.nextDouble();  
    Sum += Num[i];      
    Product *= Num[i];      
} 

Remove the ; to get your intended behavior.


If you don't need the i outside of the loop, you could move its declaration within the for statement.

for(int i=0; i<9; i++)
{
   // `i` is only usable here now
}
// `i` is now out of scope and not usable

Using this syntax when the erroneous semicolon ; was present would have produced a compile error that would alerted you to the erroneous ; earlier. THe compiler would see this:

for(int i=0; i<9; i++)
    /* no-op */;

/* inline block with no relation to for-loop */
{  
    System.out.println ("Please enter a number:");  
    Num[i] = keyboard.nextDouble();     // compile error now - `i` is out-of-scope
    Sum += Num[i];      
    Product *= Num[i];      
} 

This would be an example why it is good practice to limit the scope of variables when possible.

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Wow I knew it was going to be something stupid... arrrrgh. Thanks so much though!! It's now working as intended :) –  Steve Jan 1 '11 at 14:22

Noticed the ';' at the end of for(i=0; i<9; i++); ? ^_^

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remove the last character semicolon from for loop line ............

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To avoid this mistake in future you should always use a fresh variable in a for loop. Instead of:

for (i = 0; ...

write

for (int i = 0; ...

That way it would be a compile-time error, since the variable i would not be in scope in the following block.

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Although I would recommend your tactic, I can't see how this would have avoid this mistake of Steve –  RoflcoptrException Jan 1 '11 at 12:46
    
in the code for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++); { i++; } the identifier i goes out of scope after the semicolon and before the block. –  Roland Illig Jan 1 '11 at 12:50
    
It would have reduced the probability of the mistake, since i would be scoped to the for loop. Now Num[i] in the block below it works since i obviously has been defined before it, but otherwise a compile error would follow and the programmer would more easily realize the compound statement (the block) and the for loop are separated. –  Arjan Tijms Jan 1 '11 at 12:51

There shouldn't be a semicolon at the end of the first line. It indicates your loop is empty.

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The answer has already been given, but I'd like to add that if you are using an IDE*, there will probably be a warning for those kinds of empty statements and other easy to make, easy to overlook type of mistakes (assinging instead of comparing in conditions for example).

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just to let you know. something like this:

for(;;)
  ;

should send your program into busy-waiting. happened to me in the early days. :)

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