Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I restart a foreach loop in C#??

For example:

Action a;
foreach(Constrain c in Constrains)
{
   if(!c.Allows(a))
   {
      a.Change();
      restart;
   }
}

restart here is like continue or break but it restarts the foreach from the begining It is like setting the counter of a for loop to 0 again..

Is that possible in C#?

Edit:I want to thank both Mehrdad Afshari and Mahesh Velaga for letting me discover a bug (index=0) in my current implementation, that would not have been discovered otherwise..

share|improve this question
    
It could be interesting to know where exactly you need to use this kind of restart. You are using a list of mutable objects in some kind of algorithm. Can you share the actual problem you are trying to solve? –  Unmesh Kondolikar Jan 1 '11 at 13:09
    
The actual problem: some agents trying to move in an environment. There are barriers in the env. After each agent decides what the next motion action is, the environment checks if the agent will cross the barrier, if yes, the environment allows the agent to choose another action; and here where I need to restart the foreach loop in order to check all the barriers again with the newly selected action.. I hope that makes clear... –  Betamoo Jan 1 '11 at 18:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Use the good old goto:

restart:
foreach(Constrain c in Constrains)
{
   if(!c.Allows(a))
   {
      a.Change();
      goto restart;
   }
}

If you're diagnosed with gotophobia 100% of the time for some reason (which is not a good thing without a reason), you can try using a flag instead:

bool restart;
do {
   restart = false;
   foreach(Constrain c in Constrains)
   {
      if(!c.Allows(a))
      {
         a.Change();
         restart = true;
         break;
      }
   }
} while (restart);
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 I like your do loop implementation. –  Chuck Conway Jan 1 '11 at 13:12
5  
Be careful with gotos xkcd.com/292 –  digEmAll Jan 1 '11 at 13:16
1  
be careful! in dotnet3.5 and beyond (LINQ etc), foreach () can pull in a closure. This solution, or any other that jumps out of the loop, will dispose the closure correctly. But think it through; this is the kind of place that careful design will save lots of debugging. –  Ollie Jones Jan 1 '11 at 13:27
    
why would you want this? I mean what problem does it solve? It'd be nice to see what the original was rather than the contrived code. –  Richard Johnson Jan 14 '14 at 15:45
    
I like the "good old goto" and "gotophobia". However your suggestion for gotophobists is no better at all. break is a goto just with another name. It only jumps to the wrong place which you have to fix using a flag and an additional do-while loop - much uglier than solution 1. You probably knew that :-) But once you want to suggest a non-goto version, it should be real non-goto. Or you could completely remove that part since it is already covered by Mahesh's answer. –  chiccodoro May 27 '14 at 6:53

One way you can do that is using for, as you have already mentioned:

restart here is like continue or break but it restarts the foreach from the begining It is like setting the counter of a for loop to 0 again

Action a;
for(var index = 0; index < Constratins.Count; index++)
{
   if(!Constraints[index].Allows(a))
   {
      a.Change();
      index = -1; // restart
   }
}
share|improve this answer
6  
This is wrong. index = -1 would work, if the enumerable is index-accessible but even in that case, it makes the code hard to read and makes the intent unclear. This is a perfect instance of making things worse thing as a result of blind gotophobia. At least, with goto, the intent is perfectly clear. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:05
    
+1 This is the first solution that came to mind -- Why not use a for loop? Why create a bastardized foreach solution. –  Chuck Conway Jan 1 '11 at 13:08
    
@Mehrdad: corrected the index part. Thanks –  Mahesh Velaga Jan 1 '11 at 13:08
4  
@Chuck: Perhaps because not all collections are accessible by index? –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:08
1  
@Chuck There are other problems with this approach. It's error-prone (just proven by the original revision of the answer with index = 0). Manipulating things with indices is just asking for more problems. Let alone that manipulating a loop index is frowned upon. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:13
void Main()
{
    IEnumerable<Constrain> cons;
    SomeObject a;

    while(!TryChangeList(cons, a)) { }
}

// the name tryChangeList reveals the intent that the list will be changed
private bool TryChangeList(IEnumerable<Constrain> constrains, SomeObject a)
{
    foreach(var con in constrains)
    {
        if(!c.Allows(a))
        {
            a.Change();
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Refactoring is usually a good solution in this kind of cases if it's feasible and doesn't make things more complicated. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:11
1  
-1 what if its not an IList<T>? –  John Saunders Jan 1 '11 at 13:15
    
@John - it will work for IEnumerable as well if you change IList to IEnumerable –  Unmesh Kondolikar Jan 1 '11 at 13:15
    
I wasn't the downvoter, but you should change IList to IEnumerable. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:16
1  
I did explain. The question did not restrict itself to IList<T> –  John Saunders Jan 1 '11 at 13:20

Although a very old thread - none of the answers paid due attention to the semantics of that code:

  • You have a chain of constraints on a
  • If a breaks any of them, try another a and push that through the chain.

That is, a.Change() should be separated from the constraint checking loop, also adhering to the CQS principle:

while (!MeetsConstraints(a))
{
    a.Change();
}

bool MeetsConstraints(Thing a)
{
    return Constraints.All(c => c.Allows(a));
}

No goto, no ugly loops, just simple and clean. </self-back-slapping>

share|improve this answer
for (var en = Constrains.GetEnumerator(); en.MoveNext(); )
{
    var c = en.Current;
    if (!c.Allows(a))
    {
        a.Change();
        en = Constrains.GetEnumerator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
You'll want to Dispose the original first. –  John Saunders Jan 1 '11 at 13:12
3  
@John: Indeed. And you have to deal with potential exceptions, ... which eventually leads to a using statement, and at that point, you'd realize that you shouldn't have ditched foreach in the first place! –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 1 '11 at 13:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.