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I have read som books and done tones of turtorials, but still cant deside on good flow patterns, i guess it will come with more coding pratice, but hope i cold get som pointers from the long time coders here.

iv put down two samples, 1 fast rundown of what i want to do. And sample 2 iv refractor it to somthing, but dont even know if im on the right path? shold i use a EndCommand(); method or not? shold i use a CloseStream(); method or not? and stuff like that.

this is wery basic thing for many of you, so hope you forgive me if my samples are terrible and wrong but i just trying to learn more :).

And last how wold you build up this?

Sample 1

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleGetTestWinform
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private string _command = "tracert www.google.com";
        private string _application = "cmd";
        private string _exitCommand = "exit";

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            richTextBox1.Text += GetTrace();
        }

        private string GetTrace()
        {
            Process myprocess = new Process();
            System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo StartInfo = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo();
            StartInfo.FileName = _application;
            StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
            StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            myprocess.StartInfo = StartInfo;
            myprocess.Start();
            System.IO.StreamReader SR = myprocess.StandardOutput;
            System.IO.StreamWriter SW = myprocess.StandardInput;
            SW.WriteLine(_command);
            SW.WriteLine(_exitCommand);
            string x = SR.ReadToEnd();
            SW.Close();
            SR.Close();
            return x;
        }
    }
}

Sample 2

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleGetTestWinform
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private string _command = "tracert www.google.com";
        private string _application = "cmd";
        private string _exitCommand = "exit";

        Process process = new Process();
        ProcessStartInfo processStartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo();

        StreamReader streamReader;
        StreamWriter streamWriter;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            richTextBox1.Text += GetTrace();
        }

        private string GetTrace()
        {
            StartProcess();

            string feedBack = streamReader.ReadToEnd();//reading output form cmd to feedBack

            CloseStream();

            return feedBack;
        }

        private void StartProcess()
        {
            processStartInfo.FileName = _application;
            processStartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
            processStartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            processStartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            processStartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            process.StartInfo = processStartInfo;

            process.Start();

            streamReader = process.StandardOutput;
            streamWriter = process.StandardInput;

            RunCommand(); //starting trace           
         }

        private void RunCommand()
        {
            streamWriter.WriteLine(_command);
            EndCommand(); //killing cmd
        }

        private void EndCommand()
        {
            //exiting cmd
            streamWriter.WriteLine(_exitCommand);
        }

        private void CloseStream()
        {
            //ending stream
            streamWriter.Close();
            streamReader.Close();
        }
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I definately prefer the first example, and the other answers make some good points. However I'd like to add the following:

System.Diagnostics.Process implements IDisposable. The StreamWriter and StreamReader are owned by the Process instance. Therefore, it's likely that when a process is disposed, those objects will also be closed/disposed. I'd experiment just to verify that, but it's likely that you don't need to call .Close() on those two objects as long as you call .Dispose() on the process. Better yet (as already mentioned) use a using block with your process object to make sure it's disposed of correctly (see example below).

In the second example, you've split up some of the logic, but added member variables to the form class. Those variables don't have the same life expectancy of the form. That's a warning sign in my book - not necessarily bad, but always worth reviewing. In your second example, you'll have dead streams hanging around as long as the form hangs around after tracert has run. And, because you close the streams but don't dispose the process, you could also get a damaged process object sat there.

Try not to hang on to references to dead objects (you could set the variables to null once you've used the objects, but again, that's more error prone than the first example). Try to scope variables as low as they'll sensibly go. As a side note, if those variables were to be part of another class, where their life expectancy was the same as the containing class (such as a Tracert class, suggested in another answer), I'd have no problem with them being member variables.

While I'd be perfectly happy with the GetTrace() method from the first example, if you want to split it up, an easy way would be to make a method private Process CreateProcess() to create the Process object and set it up. This could be called by GetTrace() which would do the rest of the work. Maybe something like:

private Process GetProcess()
{
    Process myprocess = new Process();
    System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo StartInfo = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo();
    StartInfo.FileName = _application;
    StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
    StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
    myprocess.StartInfo = StartInfo;
    return myprocess;
}

private string GetTrace()
{
    using (Process myprocess = GetProcess())
    {
        myprocess.Start();
        System.IO.StreamReader SR = myprocess.StandardOutput;
        System.IO.StreamWriter SW = myprocess.StandardInput;
        SW.WriteLine(_command);
        SW.WriteLine(_exitCommand);
        string x = SR.ReadToEnd();
        return x;
    }
}

That way, you don't have to add member variables but have smaller methods with what could be argued, clearer purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
@Humphrey your wtf's/min would be highly desirable for this proposal here. Show your support and help get it into beta. :) –  greatwolf Jan 16 '11 at 23:47

The streams should be closed as soon you are done with them. To be sure that they are always closed you could use the using statement.

using (FileStream stream = File.Open ("the.file"))
{
   //Do work on 'stream'
} 

for more info see for example Does Stream.Dispose always call Stream.Close (and Stream.Flush)

share|improve this answer

I would use the first sample but add a few comments, detailing what exactly is done. The method is small enough and doesn't need refactoring in my oppinion. Also, I would use using blocks instead of explicitly calling the close methods on StreamReader and StreamWriter.

The bigger problem isn't with the method, it is with the code being in the Form itself - you shouldn't have logic in your form, put the method and everything belonging to it in an own class and name it something like Tracert.

share|improve this answer
    
oki i agrea on the class issue, i was thinking more if i make a big program how big can methods be before i need to refractor? som text iv read tells me to try to have so small methods possible but for me it seems that this dont always improve readabilety. –  Darkmage Jan 1 '11 at 16:12
    
I think there is a word missing, it should be "resonable small methods". It is as wrong and unintuitive to have lots of small methods as it is to have just one big method. There is no recipe for it either, it depends on the case. –  Femaref Jan 1 '11 at 16:22

It's a bad idea to call a blocking method like ReadToEnd in the main UI thread. If your process takes a long time to complete your GUI will hang.

Since you are writing a GUI I would recommend using an event based approach. Subscribe to the OutputDataReceived event of your process.

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