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In my application I am running the same winform in different contexts to control visibility of buttons, enabeling of text fields and the winform header text. The way I decided to do this is simply by passing a string to the form constructor and check it with a couple of if statements that in turn contain the desired winform tweaks.

if (formContext == "add")
{
    Text = "Add member";
}
if (formContext == "edit")
{
    Text = "Change role";
    userTextBox.Enabled = false;
    searchButton.Visible = false;
}

This works fine, however the "Text" keywords get a blue squigly line added by ReSharper with the following message: Viritual member call in constructor. Is this a potential problem or just some sort of overly enthusiastic ReSharper message.

Any clarification or suggestions for improvement of my implementation would be much appreciated.

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marked as duplicate by Brant Bobby, rene, Cyral, chrylis, Sliq Nov 5 '13 at 1:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A virtual member call in the base class ctor could cause some logic to run in the subclass before the subclass' ctor is called (and thus before the object gets a chance to initialize itself to a consistent state).

It's just a nice reminder so you know you are doing something that could potentially cause some nasty unexpected behavior.

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Yes... this is along the line I was thinking myself. Any suggestions as to how I could do this better. Stability is out number one priority on this project and I would prefer to avoid possible unexpected behavior. –  Sakkle Jan 19 '09 at 13:02
    
You mean suggestions besides just not calling virtual methods in your base class ctor? :-) In this situation you could use data binding to bind the Text property of the form to a string field in a GUI model class which then would contain the necessary logic to decide what the title bar should say. –  mookid8000 Jan 19 '09 at 13:10
    
Yes... I probably could, though I wouldn't know where to start, and I guess I'd have to do the same for the button and the text field. –  Sakkle Jan 19 '09 at 13:48

In addition to the existing answers, for forms you could add a Load event handler:

Load += delegate
{
    if (formContext == "add")
    {
        Text = "Add member";
    }
    if (formContext == "edit")
    {
        Text = "Change role";
        userTextBox.Enabled = false;
        searchkButton.Visible = false;
    }
};
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This seems like the easiest and best solution for what I am trying to accomplish, without me having to rewrite a lot of code. Yes... I am lazy :P –  Sakkle Jan 19 '09 at 13:46

Just seal your class.

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Please elaborate... –  Sakkle Jan 19 '09 at 15:31
1  
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/88c54tsw(VS.71).aspx A sealed class can not be inherited, therefor there is no possibility of a derived class overriding the virtual member. –  ng5000 Jan 19 '09 at 16:41

I would suggest rewriting you class as follows:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public enum FormContextMode
    {
        Add,
        Edit
    }

    private FormContextMode m_mode = FormContextMode.Add; 

    public Form1( FormContextMode mode )
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        m_mode = mode;
        Load += delegate { UpdateForm(); };
    }

    private void UpdateForm()
    {
        if( m_mode == FormContextMode.Add )
        {
            Text = "Add member";    
        }
        else if( m_mode == FormContextMode.Edit )
        {
            Text = "Change role";
            userTextBox.Enabled = false;
            searchkButton.Visible = false;
        }
    }
}
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Ahaaa... sweet :) –  Sakkle Jan 19 '09 at 15:05
    
You don't need to subscribe to own Load event, just override OnLoad method. –  Ilya Ryzhenkov Jan 19 '09 at 15:17
    
Yep, I agree with Ilya - better to overload the method then you won't need to remember to unsubscribe from the event + (and this is a gut-feel statement) probably quicker. –  ng5000 Jan 19 '09 at 16:07
    
Don't create a "2nd answer", it's just confusing. This answer on its own does not meet the "Any clarification or suggestions for improvement" demand in the question. –  bzlm Jan 26 '09 at 8:13
    
Original answer deleted and replaced with this one, updated as shown. –  ng5000 Jan 27 '09 at 11:39

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