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#include <stdio.h>

#define MEM_SIZE 16

typedef struct memory_contents{
 unsigned char mem[MEM_SIZE]; /* memory */
} mem;

mem init(char prog[]){
 mem chip = {prog};
 return chip;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
 char memory[MEM_SIZE] = {0}; /* zero out whole array */
 mem chip = init(memory);

 printf("%d\n", chip.mem[0]);
    return 0;
}

Am I right in thinking that what this code does (specifically, the init function) is try to put the address of the variable 'memory' into the struct's array? (and hence this is why it's printing a non-zero value)

What I'm trying to achieve is to initialise the struct such that the struct's mem array is the prog[] parameter. What's the preferred, or best, way of doing this? I could make the struct's mem a pointer to the first element of an array of size MEM_SIZE, but I feel that might cause problems: if I change the memory array in main later down the line, it'll change the values in chip's array too.

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5 Answers 5

Here is the recommended way of doing this:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MEM_SIZE 16

typedef struct memory_contents{
 unsigned char mem[MEM_SIZE]; /* memory */
} mem_t;

mem_t* init (char* arr)
{
    mem_t* info = (mem_t*) malloc (sizeof (mem_t));
    if (!info)
    return NULL:    /* No memory */

    memcpy (&info->mem, arr, MEM_SIZE);
    return info;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    unsigned char memory[MEM_SIZE] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,0};
    mem_t* chip = init (memory);
    if (!chip)
    return ENOMEM;

    printf("values: %d %d\n", chip->mem[0], chip->mem[1]);

    if (chip)
    free (chip);

    return 0;
}

one more point to note: Try not have the structure field member name and structure name same. They might cause a lot of conflicts.

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Yeah, my bad for the two 'mem's. Is the appended _t in mem_t the accepted way people differente a type (size_t, time_t for example)? –  user559865 Jan 1 '11 at 17:43
    
That depends on what coding formats (or guidelines) you are following. I usually prefer this (usually followed in lot of *NIX code): typedef struct foobar_st {int a;} foobar_t; –  Vikram.exe Jan 1 '11 at 17:49
    
No, names ending in _t are reserved by standards and it is likely you will conflict with an OS implementation at some point. So it is best to avoid them. –  jilles Jan 1 '11 at 19:32
    
I recommend against the casts, though. –  user502515 Jan 1 '11 at 20:49
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You can't change the struct's mem pointer because it's not a normal pointer -- the name mem is just a name for the address of that field. Don't initialize arrays using { ... } notation; it's just hard to read and confusing (it certainly confused me...). Use memcpy instead.


Edit:

Your code doesn't compile with my compiler:

error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'char []' to 'char'
    This conversion requires a reinterpret_cast, a C-style cast or function-style cast

(The error is at this line: mem chip = {prog};)

I was at first confused at why your code even compiled, and after checking it here, it makes sense: Like I stated above, you're trying to assign an array/pointer to mem, which is not allowed because mem is simply a name for the address of the array, not a pointer that can change. So you have to use memcpy to copy the elements.

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What's wrong with brace initializers - when used correctly, of course? Why are they confusing? –  Charles Bailey Jan 1 '11 at 17:30
    
It's confusing here because it's initializing an array, not a scalar. (E.g.: Is it assigning a value to the first element? Or to the entire array? Does it even compile? If not, is it because you can't assign a pointer to a char, or because of something else? It makes the reader think too much.) I don't like them in general for other reasons, but that's just personal taste; in this particular case, though, I think they're best avoided. –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '11 at 17:33
    
Thanks - memcpy seems like a decent solution. My only other concern is that if I change MEM_SIZE to something large, would doing the copy take a noticeable amount of time? –  user559865 Jan 1 '11 at 17:33
    
It would take the same amount of time as any other method -- the amount of time needed to copy the array. If you want to avoid the copying, use a pointer instead of an array. :) –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '11 at 17:35
    
Obviously it's not correct in this case because the initializer itself is wrong but it sounded like you were recommending against initializing arrays at all and always using memcpy to populate them. –  Charles Bailey Jan 1 '11 at 17:37
show 6 more comments
  1. Use memcpy to copy data
  2. Allocate new memory in func init, the 'chip' will be recovered when the func init end.
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All of the above are recommended ways of copying data from a buffer into a contained buffer defined in a struct.

And, to answer your question - yes. You're initializing the array with the pointer value. Initializing the array like you did in main with "memory": char memory[MAX_SIZE] = { 0 }; // array intialization.

Performing a memcpy() is the preferred way of doing this. Also - it's bad practice returning a local struct from a function - the preferred way is to allocate an object on the heap and do a memcpy. (Though the compiler could optimise this out - with the extra copying) It's just horrible practice.

If you know the structure of the array at compile time: Other possibilities are c99 struct initializations (usually done within kernel mode): mem_t memObj = { .mem = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 } }; or simply: mem_t memObj = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }; (in your example, since it's the only member)

Note: When doing array initializations, it's similar to zero'ing out the rest of the elements in the array - could be not what you were expecting/wanted.

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Why is it considered bad practice to return a local struct? –  user559865 Jan 2 '11 at 0:12
    
Technically - you'd want to pass in a struct to fill by ptr/ref. You're copying the entire struct object if you return a struct from a function. –  tperk Jan 2 '11 at 0:37
    
Oh, fair enough. –  user559865 Jan 2 '11 at 0:44
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For your struct you can use the implicit struct-content-copy like:

mem init(char *prog){
 return *(mem*)prog;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
 char memory[MEM_SIZE] = {0xAA,0xBB,0xCC,0xDD}; /* non zero test values */

 mem chip = init(memory);
 printf("%02X%02X%02X%02X\n",chip.mem[0],chip.mem[1],chip.mem[2],chip.mem[3]);

 memory[1]=0;
 chip = init(memory);
 printf("%02X%02X%02X%02X\n",chip.mem[0],chip.mem[1],chip.mem[2],chip.mem[3]);

 return 0;
}
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