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I'm building a url dynamically and needed a way to add an NSNumber's intValue to the end of it.

NSNumber *hatId = [NSNumber NumberWithInt:25]
NSMutableString* theUrlString = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
[theUrlString appendFormat:@"http://www.website.com/SelectHat/%d", [hatid intValue]];
NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:theUrlString];

After doing the above a simple unit test or NSLog will show the result looks valid

http://www.website.com/SelectHat/25

But my question is this - does concatenation in this way alter the NSString so it's no long a valid string like I would expect? also is this a "good" way to build a string that needs the intValue from an NSNumber?

Update

I just wanted to make sure the %d inline was no problem and the NSString was as I expected it would be. The issue I'm having is a bit more complex so I'll save that for another question. Thanks for the replies about NSURL / NSNumber / int as I'm still learning a great deal about objective-c

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No need to use alloc/init, either. Just do theUrlString = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"..... %d", hadId]. –  bbum Jan 1 '11 at 20:05
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm curious why you think appending content to a mutable string would make that string invalid. If you're having a problem please share what's actually going wrong.

[theUrlString appendFormat:@"http://www.website.com/SelectHat/%d", [hatid intValue]];

Is valid and a fine way to modify a NSMutableString.

Since you're building a URL you might want to use NSURL directly instead. Look at +URLWithString:realtiveToURL: and -URLByAppendingPathComponent: as ways to build a NSURL. Those methods can be convenient because they will prevent you from accidentally creating a string ending in "SelectHat25" or "SelectHat//25" when you wanted "SelectHat/25".

Now strings and URLs aside

NSNumber* hatid = 25;

is not valid. That's creating a pointer to an NSNumber object and assigning it to an int value. You'll be looking for a NSNumber object at memory address '25' and who knows what you'll find there. You should be constructing an instance of NSNumber instead or just using an int type.

NSNumber* hatid = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithUnsignedInteger:25];

NSUInteger hatid = 25
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NSNumber *hatId = [NSNumber NumberWithInt:25]
NSMutableString* theUrlString = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
[theUrlString appendFormat:@"http://www.website.com/SelectHat/%d", [hatid intValue]];
NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:theUrlString];

The above can easily be reduced to a single line of code:

NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString: [NSString stringWithFormat: @"http://www.website.com/SelectHat/%d", 25]];
  • no need to create an NSNumber unless you really want one

  • no need to separately alloc/init the string

  • no need to use a mutable string at all

And, no, modifying a mutable string does not make the string invalid.

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If you're going to hard code the hatID you can make it even shorter: NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://www.website.com/SelectHat/25"]; –  Abizern Jan 2 '11 at 1:13
    
Yup -- I was sorta assuming there'd be a variable for the 25... but, yeah. –  bbum Jan 2 '11 at 1:56
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Why do you think this would produce an "invalid" string? Using the appendFormat method simply extends the mutable string as required.

In terms of whether it's a good way to build a string - if you have all of the information up front, you could simply create a new (non mutable) string via the initWithFormat method. That said, there's nothing wrong with what you're doing. (That said, there's no need to use an NSNumber - a standard int would do. You're also not initialising the NSNumber correctly as @Abizern has illustrated in his answer.)

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This line is wrong

NSNumber* hatid = 25;

An NSNumber is an object. You can't just initialise it like that. Try this:

NSNumber *hatId = [NSNumber NumberWithInt:25]

As for your question - an NSString is an NSString as long as you create it properly. But, is there any reason the number is being kept as an NSNumber instead of as a string?

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