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In JavaScript, I know that a closure is can be defined as a nested function that has access to its containing function's variables. For example:

function outerFunction(x, y) {
    function innerFunction() {
        return x + y + 10;
    }
    return innerFunction;
}

Now, the following code is wiring up a callback for the onreadystatechange property of the request object; however, I was wondering if, by definition, this is also considered to be a closure:

/* This is a contrived example, I know. 
 * Bear with me - it demonstrates the point I'm trying to convey. */

function submitHandler() {

    var oRequest = createRequest(); // assume I'm getting an instance of the xhr
    var sUsername = 'Tom';          // assume this is needed for work in the handler
    var This = this;
    oRequest.onreadystatechange = function() {
        This.handleResponse(oRequest, sUsername)
    }

}

function handleResponse(oResponse, sUsername) {
    if(oResponse.readyState === 4 && oResponse.status === 200) {
        // do work with the username
    } else {
        // we're not done yet...
    }
}

I realize that the handleResponse function could also just be written as an anonymous function in the context of submitHandler, but I find that more complex Ajax code can be more readable and easily maintained if callbacks are defined outside the scope of the function calling back to them. Again, this is a contrived example that I'm using in hopes of simply demonstrating the point of my question.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you are correct in assuming that it is a closure by definition.

It sounds like you know your stuff but here is a good, extensive article on javascript closures.

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I wholeheartedly agree that too many inline closure functions don't enhance readability. On the other hand I strongly dislike the var self = this style of writing closures, to which this is just a variant, as it's still too verbose in its declaration, and you introduce your own new 'keyword' whether that is this or self.

What you want is to curry/bind the method.

function $A(o)
{
    var a = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < o.length; ++i)
        a.push(o[i]);
    return a;
}

Function.prototype.bind = function()
{
   var _method = this;
   var a = $A(arguments)
   var o = a.shift();

   return function()
   {
       return _method.apply(o, a.concat($A(arguments)));
   }
}

Function.prototype.curry = function()
{
   var _method = this;
   var a = $A(arguments);

   return function()
   {
       return _method.apply(null, a.concat($A(arguments)));
   }
}

The methods are taken from the Prototype library. I use these even in projects that don't use the Prototype library as they are very useful!

In your case this means instead of writing:

var This = this;
oRequest.onreadystatechange = function() {
    This.handleResponse(oRequest, sUsername)
}

you can now write:

oRequest.onreadystatechange = this.handleResponse.curry(oRequest,sUsername);

However if you want to transfer the meaning of the this keyword you could do this

oRequest.onreadystatechange = this.handleResponse.bind(this,oRequest,sUsername);

handleResponse, when called, will have the same this context as the submitHandler.

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Your first example is not a closure. It would have been had you returned innerFunction but you are executing the innerFunction and returning the result.

The second example works and is using a closure. One caveat with this specific technique is that you can end up with quite a severe memory leak in some browser implementations (IE certainly and may be others). You will have created a circular reference between the xhr held in oRequest, the onreadystatechange referencing a function and that functions scope being the scope where the xhr is held. Not only will the xhr remain in memory so will the response which if large (and especially if XML) can gobble memory quickly.

Set the onreadystatechange property to an empty global level function during the handling for the response. This will break the circle.

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+1 for noticing the first one isn't a closure. –  Andrew Hare Jan 19 '09 at 13:43
    
Thanks for the heads up - edited my initial example of a closure. Also, I like your discussion of the circular references on oRequest. I typically don't write my production-level code like this, but this seemed to be a quick example for purposes of this question. –  Tom Jan 19 '09 at 14:15

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