Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Is there a way to know the current run of a foreach without have to:

Int32 i;
foreach
   i++;

or is that the best option I got? Also, how can I know the maximum number of items on that loop? What I am trying to do is update a progressbar during a foreach loop on my form.

This is what I have so far:

    FileInfo[] directoryFiles = (new DirectoryInfo(folderBrowserDialog.SelectedPath)).GetFiles("*.*");
    foreach (FileInfo file in directoryFiles)
    {
        if ((file.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden || (file.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
            continue;

        backgroundWorkerLoadDir.ReportProgress(i, file.Name);
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
    }

So it should be like the following, right?

   for (Int32 i = 0; i < DirectoryFiles.Length; i++)
   {
       if ((DirectoryFiles[i].Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden || (DirectoryFiles[i].Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
           continue;

       backgroundWorkerLoadDir.ReportProgress((i / DirectoryFiles.Length) * 100, DirectoryFiles[i].Name);
       System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
   }
share|improve this question
2  
Could you paste your current code, including the declaration for the collection that you're iterating? –  Reinderien Jan 1 '11 at 22:43
2  
Please post some real code, not pseudo-code. –  Martin v. Löwis Jan 1 '11 at 22:43
    
what is the type of array /collection u are looping through? –  Tasawer Khan Jan 1 '11 at 22:48
    
Looks like what you are after is something like enumerate in Python, however there is not a C# equivalent. The other answers given outline your options in C#. Update Actually, this is discussed in another post - stackoverflow.com/questions/521687/c-foreach-with-index –  Jared Knipp Jan 1 '11 at 22:49
    
If i use the For loop, how can i make it doesn't count on the hidden files and system ones? would i need to make another loop to count the number of files 1st? –  Eyla Jan 1 '11 at 22:55

6 Answers 6

Use for loop instead of foreach. That is better in this situation.

Use it like this:

count = DirectoryFiles.Length;
for (int k = 0; k < count; k++)
{
    FileInfo file = DirectoryFiles[k];
    if ((file.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden || 
        (file.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
    {
        continue;
    }

    backgroundWorkerLoadDir.ReportProgress(i, file.Name);
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to say this, but this doesn't work for ICollection. :( –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '11 at 22:46
    
@Lambert good point. Not sure what OP is trying to loop through. –  Tasawer Khan Jan 1 '11 at 22:51
    
The example you've given looks like a for loop to me... –  Cody Gray Jan 2 '11 at 6:12
    
@cody it is a for loop. I think it is more suitable in this situation –  Tasawer Khan Jan 2 '11 at 11:35
    
Heh, sorry. I meant to type foreach suggesting that you edit your answer to a for loop instead. But I apparently made the inverse error that you did. I see you've already fixed it, though, so no matter! +1 –  Cody Gray Jan 3 '11 at 4:25

Foreach is a fairly big deal, its underlying plumbing is a very simple forward-only iterator that doesn't require having to know up front how many items are in the collection. IEnumerator<>.

Which is in general is a rather nasty mismatch with a ProgressBar. You can only meaningfully update the standard one when you know up front how many items you're iterating. So you can set its Maximum property. If that's possible then you no doubt have access to a Count property and have an indexer as well. Which then lets you use a for() statement, problem solved.

But it is pretty common that you have no idea up front how many items there are to iterate. Typical with dbase queries for example. Since you can't find out how long it might take to iterate, you've only got one option on the progress bar: Style = Marquee. The "I'm not dead, I'm working" way of reporting progress. Problem solved.

share|improve this answer

That's your best option, because standard for loops don't work on IEnumerables that are not indexable. If you need to know the number of items, use the Count property; if none is available, then obviously by definition you can't know ahead of time.

share|improve this answer

No, it is impossible for IEnumerable, because it has not Count/Length property. Moreover, you can easily imagine infinite IEnumerable sequence, like:

private readonly Random rand = new Random();
private IEnumerable<int> GetInfiniteRandomSequence() 
{
    while(true)
    {
        yield return rand.Next();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The basic principle for this problem is the following:

List<string> numbers = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three" };

foreach (var num in numbers.Select((value, index) => new { value, index }))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Value: {0}, Index: {1}", num.value, num.index);
}

This will create a new anonymous type within the foreach loop that contains the value and index within the num variable.

So to solve the problem provided in the OP:

FileInfo[] directoryFiles = (new DirectoryInfo(folderBrowserDialog.SelectedPath)).GetFiles("*.*");
foreach (FileInfo file in directoryFiles.Select((value, index) => new {value, index}))
{
    if ((file.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) == FileAttributes.Hidden
          ||
        (file.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) == FileAttributes.System)
        continue;

    int progress = (file.index / DirectoryFiles.Length) * 100;

    backgroundWorkerLoadDir.ReportProgress(progress, file.value.Name);
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
}
share|improve this answer
using System.Linq;

for (var i = 0; i < items.Count(); i++)
{
    // Update progress bar here.
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for ICollection. –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '11 at 22:45
    
I added the using directive and changed the Count to a method. That will work for ICollection containers. –  Michael S. Scherotter Jan 1 '11 at 22:49
    
Now it's only for .NET 3.5+... :) and by the way, that is very slow because I don't think the JIT compiler can see far enough to only evaluate items.Count() once, so it'll evaluate it multiple times, resulting in a dramatic speed decrease for some collections. You'd need to cache the variable in the beginning. :) –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '11 at 22:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.